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Thomas Hellen was here last Evening and goes to–morrow Morning for Washington—I furnished him with sixty dollars to defray the expenses for which I took an order upon Mr T. Cook—George has paid for him 125 dollars quarterly; but his expenses have exceeded that sum and he has contracted some debts which must be paid,—not considerable I hope. We shall begin tomorrow to make the arrangements for...
Mr Henry Warren, a Son of your late friend Dr John Warren—and a young lawyer of promising hopes is a bout to travel to Washington—and will have the honour to deliver you this letter—I hope you will receive him with the utmost cordiality, for his Name and Blood are very dear to me The last news we have from your Sons—was their visit to Mr Boyleston last Saturday—In fine health and Spirits—to...
I have received since I wrote you last two letters from you but cannot learn directly from either of them whether you had received my number 1. Yesterday the National birth day was kept here in small style. It rained great part of the day and yet the heat was melting—At the Capitol Dr Watkins read the Declaration, and Mr Hawley made a prayer. The dinner at Strothers was thinly attended but the...
I have received your letter of the 31st: of last month, with great pleasure to learn that the health of the children is better than it had been.—My anxiety for them, and especially for the youngest on hearing of his repeated illness has been so great as in some degree to affect my own health, and still more my Spirits—I depend however entirely upon you for their management, knowing and...
Since my last letter to you I have not enjoyed the happiness of hearing from you—I hope however that you and the children have been and continue in good health, as well as your Mamma and all the family. I went into Boston on Saturday, and had all the things which Mrs: Whitcomb had procured for you ship’d on board the schooner Alert , Captain Smith, bound to Alexandria and Georgetown—They are...
Altho I have not written to you since the return of your Husband to Quincy, I have had the pleasure of hearing weekly from you through him; and of learning that you, and the Children are well. I want to see the dear Boys, and regret that they are like to be so long seperated from me. George will forget us and John cannot know us. I have a great opinion of childrens being early attached to...
Let me express to you my gratitude for your last note on reading which I had a foretaste of the suffering I should have undergone had the dreadful rumour you mentioned preceded it. I most heartily thank God that my Father was saved to you, to his children, to his country. The idea of his loss is too terrible to think of and at the time when your note arrived; not having recovered a calm tone...
I received yesterday your letter of the 15th: and this morning that of the 17th: enclosing in the former a letter from to your Mamma, and in the latter, one to Mrs: Boyd—We are now at the last days of the Session, and you know how much we are oppress’d with public business at such times—This will give you my excuse for the shortness of this letter—It is not yet certain whether the members of...
From your letter of the 20th: which I have just received, I am in doubt whether even this letter will not reach New-York, too late to meet you—I wrote you last Thursday a letter directed to Washington enclosing one hundred Dollars for defraying the expences of your Journey—I hope you have left such directions, that the letter will be transmitted safely to you— The house which I expected to...
I have just received your letter of 24. Decr: and lament that the expression of my anxiety to hear from you should in any respect have been understood by you as implying any idea of complaint as if you had been negligent in writing—I never had such intention, and have always been convinced of your attention in writing regularly. It gives me great pain to find by your letter that your health &...
one week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear—if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly that the Eyes of all Europe were upon them it—and it may be safely said that the eyes of all Europe, and of all America North...
Your Journal beginning the third of the month has given me great pleasure. You are much to be envied and much to be pitied; such a variety of good Company is very desirable, but so much cerimoney and such fatigues must be rather burdensome.— We have received this morning the annunciation of Mr. Clays “GREAT UNKNOWN VOLUME OF GHENTISH HISTORY ” It will appear I presume at least as soon as the...
I should have answered your kind letter of the 13th. a day or two sooner, but for company which has fallen in, and call’d me away just at the time I devoted to the purpose of writing—Mr: & Mrs: Greenleaf of Cambridge, Charlotte Welsh, and her brother William, who has just returned from India, and Mr: Isaac Smith, and his Sister, who are here at this time—And yesterday, a tea-party of fifteen...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that many Mr Randolph or Roanoke is in a state of insanity—and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr Randolph has appeared through his whole public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengence without cause...
My project of coming from Washington to this place, by the way of Annapolis was disappointed, by the badness of the roads, which prevented the arrival of the Stage from Annapolis in Season for us to take it the 4th:—so I took my passage on the usual way to Baltimore, Thursday and arrived here by the new line of Packets last Evening—To-morrow, I shall pursue my journey to New-York, where I...
If Nature in scattering her bounties had bestowed upon me the genius of a Poet or a Painter I would entertain you with a description of a scene of sublimity, beauty, and novelty, such as eighty four winters never before presented to my sight: when I arose in the morning, the Sun was rising, the heavens were not of Brass but the Sky was a vast concave of clear blue marble and the earth was of...
I have received your Letters of the 9th and 10th. and am able now only to ask you not to be disappointed if I should not reach Dedham next Saturday as I have proposed. The day before yesterday I was obliged to send an Express to the President, who is at Shannondale Springs—His answer might have obliged me to put off my visit to the North entirely—The Express has just returned—I cannot start...
A most unpleasant journey was completed by our arrival at Quincy last week where we had the satisfaction of finding grandfather in better health and more comfortable than when we had last seen him. Two days afterwards Charles left us and returned to Cambridge anticipating much pleasure from the remaining months of his residence there but a little afflicted by the assignment of a part to him...
As I take a great interest in your pleasures, and your troubles, your last Journal has given me a large share of both—the social scenes are delightful and the prospect of trouble is afflicting—I am interested too in the Journey of our Collegians who came here on Thursday—sett all the Tailors with their Needles in Motion—and on Saturday went to Boston with their Uncle who fitted them off with...
Two days ago, I wrote you my best friend, expressing great anxiety at not having heard from you for almost a month—I therefore now add a line to mention that I received last evening your two letters of the 5th: and 12th: of this month; by the latter of which it appears that you had again been a day or two longer than usual without hearing from me—I have never failed to write you every week,...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that Mr. Randolph of Roanoke is in a state of insanity, and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr. Randolph has appeared through his whole Public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengeance without cause against...
We have an interesting question whether by the “middle of the week” which in your Journal of last Saturday you mentioned as the time when you expected to reach home, you intended the middle of this week or of the next—If of the present it is already here; but then your last Journal which is of Tuesday, was written in expectation of hearing from one, which you doubtless did the next Morning. I...
I have just received your Letter from Ballston, with the greater pleasure, as it gives a better account of your health, than that of the 7th. instt. from Cedar Grove. I am also glad to perceive that you had met Dr Hurtt, and no doubt received from him the Letter which I wrote you by him, from Boston—I have since written twice to you, and once to Charles, and addressed the Letters to Lebanon,...
I have duly received your kind Letters of 11. 12 and 16 instt—I wrote to you at New–York and on the 14th. and 16th. from this place—the last by Thomas Hellen—Since then I have been so much occupied in making the arrangements for the disposal of my father’s Estate, but three fourths of my time has been absorbed by Company—Not a day passes without visitors, and after nine O’Clock in the Morning...
Receiving on Sunday your rebuke for the blank covers I had forwarded to you, I should have it more severely had I not concluded that about the same hour you would be receiving from me the proof that I had not been altogether so remiss as you had supposed. We have had since the beginning of the month such a succession of roasters, day and night that I have felt myself almost reduced to the...
I received Your Letter of July 18th on Saturday 25th. It was a great damper to me, who had been pleasing myself with the expectation of Soon Seeing you, and my Son—nor can I now relinquish the hope, that the impediments you mention, may be so accommodated as to give mr Adams a few weeks respite at least. From the account you give of your health, I Should think you would be benefited: by a...
The mountains have vanished, and the ground is again bare in most places. the roads are excessive rough, and the weather uncommonly cold for March. I hope it will Soften & the Roads become smoother, before Saturday when I shall send in the carriage for you. I do not think that George will have the Measles. I thought that voyage to England, would end in a matrimonial engagement in Boston I wish...
It is really afflicting to hear that you are again subjected to painful illness and to observe in your letters a depression and melancholy which are not natural to your character and which are I fear gaining ground over you. I do not think with those who attribute your indisposition to the election, although the scandalous persecution to which my Father has been subjected and the unblushing...
Ever since the middle of the last month we have been in such a succession of events and interruptions that the time has slipped away with out a moments reflection on the interval between this letter and my last. On the 15th. of June General La Fayette came and his arrival was the signal for dinners parties and shows. You ask for a description of the 17th. of June. It has not been attempted...
I have duly recieved your letter of the 28th. of July expressing a wish that your brother could find some emploiment in New Orleans in which his knolege of the French & Spanish languages might be made useful. it would have been pleasing to me to have been able to point out such an emploiment, & more so to add that any such was within my powers of appointment. but the only appointments I make...
Permit me, Madam, to lay before you these few lines put together at your request. You may indeed in some sort be considered as the author of them, for the plan is almost entirely your own and the small merit I have to claim in them is merely that of working on your design. They do not vie with the productions of the immortal masters of the art: you will find however as I trust, that they have...
I thank you for your affectionate remembrance of my birthday—We passed it as pleasantly as circumstances would admit at Mr Frye’s; but I was not very well that day and was more than usually overpowered by the heat—On returning home too we were caught in a thunder–shower and throughly drenched. The Metropolis is daily thinning off—The Secretary of the Navy and family are gone—The President goes...
I have just this morning received your kind favour of the 2d: instt: which at once confirmed my apprehensions, and in some degree relieved my anxiety—From the time that the Saturday pass’d over untill now I have had an aching heart, and although I learn from your letter that you had been very ill, yet to know you were on the recovery, and had pass’d what I had long looked forward to as a very...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...
I send you my dear Madam—the two Books you were curious to see—I was sorry the other evening we did not find you—but hope you received the Books—I claim yr kind promise of the journey in Silesia—or the said letters so frisky on This country, I set out this morning with the intention of paying my affectionate respects to you and the little Beauty—but the snow drove me home what weather one...
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...
The Sun is just making his appearance for the first time these five days, during which we have had a cold North-East Storm, and almost continual rains—In the midst of this gloom, which has confined us closely to the house, I received your letter of the 10th: with the account of our dear child’s illness—It has distress’d me much; and though I hope it is only the previous indisposition to the...
I have received your Letters of the 13th. and 14th from Lebanon, and rejoice with exceeding joy at the recovery of your health—From other Letters received here I learn that you intended to remain at Lebanon, only a very few days, and I scarcely know whether this will find you there My Letter of the 17th. which I hope you will receive this day will inform you of Mr Boyleston’s affectionate...
I write you without knowing where or when my Letter will find you, and must therefore I must omit much of what I wish to say to you—I received this Morning your Letter of the 21st. (Monday) from Lebanon, and its enclosure I suppose of the same day—but it was post marked Northampton the 23d—It is evident that when you wrote it, you had not received my Letter of the 17th. proposing to meet you...
The day after I wrote you from Baltimore, that is to say on Thursday, I came to this place; though in the Night at Baltimore I was taken so ill, that I was afraid I should be obliged to postpone for a day or two the completion of my journey—I am however now as well as usual. The expedition with which I travell’d has given me two days more here than I expected when I left you—But they have been...
I have been expecting to hear from you these two or three days, and begin to feel some anxiety to learn how you all have been since I left you. Yesterday was the day at which the Session of Congress commenced, and a Quorum of both houses appeared—The President’s Message has just been read, and is very long—But it gives no information on the subjects of the highest importance to the Nation—the...
Your favor of the 16th. is a reviving cordial in which I have languished for a fortnight—But I have to complain, that it is only two days, since I heard since I heard of George’s misfortune. I suppose it has been concealed in tenderness to me, but I wish to hear the worst of bad news from the begining. This tenderness for me has concealed many misfortunes which if they had been communicated to...
No Journal received this day—But there was one yesterday, and I hope for one to-morrow—We have had now a week of heat as oppressive as any of the whole Summer, and two or three of the Nights have been more so. Though I have no doubt, you find it equally insupportable at Philadelphia, it reconciles me to your stay there; because I would have you come home to a temperate climate, as well as to...
We have this moment arrived thus far on our Journey, safe, and untill the last Station without accident. When we had proceeded four Verste from the last Post-house we found the Crane neck of our Carriage was broke in two, and we reached this place with much difficulty—A consequence of this first mishap has been that my Servants’ portmanteau has been lost from behind the Carriage—He is going...
Allow Me To present To you Mr Steuart Wortley, and Mr Stanly—They are Gentlemen of high rank, who are visiting America, and are anxious not To run through The County, but To become acquainted with our Society;—and I cannot with The pride of An American resist The gratification of Making Them known To Mr Adams, and yourself—Wortley is the Nephew of Lord Bristol, and Ld Liverpool—Mr Stanley of...
I am indebted to you for several very entertaining Letters, while I have not any thing in return to amuse you with. Some marriages amongst the young folk are taking place, miss E Gerry last week to a Major Townsend. Susan was at the visit party. She is well married it is Said. a daughter of doctor Hoolbrooks to a mr Vincet, Brother to mrs E Everet who was lately in England. miss Hoolbrook is...
You could not have asked my dear Mrs. Adams a happier a more glorious transition from earth to Heaven—on that day fifty years since consecrated to his blessed memory—I was not there at the moment but he left the world as I expected a tranquil calm sunset—when I had the ever to be remembered happiness of passing three days with him a short time since He could at times only give utterance to his...
On the back of my last Letter, I acknowledged the receipt of yours of the 14th. and yesterday came your delightful Journal of the next day—I am charmed to find that you meet with so many friends and acquaintance at Philadelphia; and much more so that Dr Physick, has satisfied himself that there is no dropsy in your case. Commodore Rodgers called on me this Morning to say he was going for...
We continue to be delighted almost daily with your journalizing Letters—which together with our visits to the theatre, enliven the dulness of our half–solitude—Scarcely a day passes indeed but I have new visitors at my Office; but they all merely candidates for Office, and though of course all persons of extraordinary merit, their conversation has no tendency to make or keep one cool, in these...
You will no doubt my dear Mrs. Adams, be much surprised at receiving a letter from one of whom you have seen and known so little as myself; but the kind, and I may almost say affectionate manner that you have always shown towards me in our occasional meetings at Mr. Hopkinson’s, has emboldened me to sue for a favour which perhaps I should not otherwise have thought of— My brother has been for...