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AU NOM DU ROI. Nous Ambassadeur de S. M. le Roi de France près S. M. l’Empereur de toutes les Russies prions les Officiers Civils et Militaires, chargés de maintenir l’ordre public dans tous les Pays amis ou alliés de la France, de laisser librement passer Madame Louise Catherine Adams et Monsieur charles Francois Adams son fils, se rendant à Paris avec leurs domestiques. et de leur donner...
Mr Allston presents his compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams—he will do himself the honour to wait on them agreeably to thier invitation MHi : Adams Papers.
Sont invitées de la part de Mme Colombi et de celle de Mr. François Colombi à assister aux cérémonies funèbres d’Antoine Colombi, leur Époux et frère, qui auront lieu Lundi 20 Mars, dans l’Église Catholique, à 10 heures du matin. MQA .
I would not come to Town to day because I knew I should only add to yours, and my own agony, my Heart is with you, my prayers and blessing attend you, the dear Children you have left, will be dearer to me for the absence of their parents, and my care whilst, Providence continues to me my faculties, and my Life. If your Father and I Should be removed, they cannot fail of finding Friends and...
I address you jointly and congratulate you upon the fine weather we have had since you commenced your journey I hope e’er this day, you have reached washington in safety , with your dear little Boy; for whose Safety, I was not a little anxious through so long and fatigueing a journey. We had the pleasure to receive a Letter from you, informing us of your arrival at New york— The week after you...
Mr Pinkney presents his Complements to Mr & Mrs Adams and will have the Honour to wait on them at Dinner on Thursday the 3d of February.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr. & Mrs. Cook ask leave to present to Mr. & Mrs. Adams the Compts. of the Season— Your Letters do much good, are treated with very great respect indeed —I think you have now more influence than when here—not mere opinions in which you deal very sparingly but the excellent Arguments & reasons you give for every conclusion— As I flatter myself with the Hope of more of your Favours embracing an...
The reason that you did not receive a Letter from me when you arrived at Philadelphia, was oweing to my being so sick that I could not write. I got your Brother to write, but not so soon as I should, if I had been able. as soon as I could hold my pen I wrote you a few lines, since which I have received your Letter from Newyork; I have rejoiced in the fine weather which has followed you ever...
The Master of the Ceremonies is commanded by His Royal Highness The Prince Regent to invite The American Minister and Mrs. Adams to The Queen’s Palace on Monday next the 22d. Instant between Eight and half past Eight O’clock in the Evening, to be present at the Ceremony of the Marriage of Her Royal Highness The Princess Mary with His Royal Highness The Duke of Gloucester.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr. Marshall accepts with great pleasure the invitation of Mr and Mrs. Adams to dine with them on friday the 3d. of March at five MHi : Endicott Family Autograph Collection.
Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
I must beg of you to tell the Doctor to give me and my brother our pay they are going to arrest me of Breaking down the door of Number one and I and my brother say we did not do that I think we ought to have our pay Mr Stradway wont give it to me I am your affectionate Son MBAt .
I received yesterday your Letter of Novbr 27th. and was rejoiced to learn that you and the Children were well. I was just contemplating writing a Letter to my son to chide him for not writing to inform me, how George was grown, and improved, what he said when he saw his pappa again, and how mister John came on, whether he is as grave as his Brother George was how Master Georges socks fitted...
It is sometimes said that suspense is worse than the certainty of evil—But it is a hard relief from suspense to be informed of evils worse than were apprehended. From the length of time which had pass’d without bringing me a letter from you, I felt great anxiety; but it was principally for the dear child, whom I had left so unwell—Your letter when it came, announced to me not only the child...
Captain Bates arrived here yesterday morning, from Amsterdam, and has lent me a number of American Newspapers, of the month of August, and to the first of September inclusive—They were brought by the Dutch vessel, the Prince of Orange, arrived at the Texel—The same that had touched at Havre de Grace—The Dutch Minister, Mr Changuion had gone in her to America, conveyed by the Ajax, a Dutch...
I have received only one letter from you—that of 25. Novr: since I left you—And none from any of my other friends—Though I accustom myself to Patience in the expectation of Letters I begin to feel extremely anxious; lest some of you should be ill—The Mails have been interrupted by the obstructions in the Roads, and I have imputed the delay of your letters to this as long as I could—But we have...
Mr Harris has the honor to hand herewith inclosed to Mrs Adams the several passports and Letters Required for her journey to Berlin and Paris. Vizt. 1. Padrogena or order for Relays; to which is Subjoined a Circular Letter from the Minister of the Interior, to the Post Masters on the Road— This paper had better be given in Charge to the Confidential Servant, as it will be necessary to produce...
My last Letter accounted regularly for my progress from Stockholm, only as far as Oerebro, where I arrived, at 11. O’Clock on Friday Evening 3. June. My Servant according to my directions had waited for me there—I immediately made up his ticket or Marche-route for the next day; allowing for the Stages, at the same rate of time that I had untill then found necessary. I dispatched him...
I received this morning your letter of the 4th: instt: which gave me pleasure as containing the information of the children’s health; and sorrow by that of your own indisposition—The remainder of the letter was equally painful and unexpected to me—Our separation was very much against my inclination, but it was your own choice, and it has been my unvaried principle, and I hope will always be...
The wind, which had been blowing for ten days to the Westward having yesterday become fair, Captain Angus went up to Gothenburg, and informed Mr Russell and me that he was ready to sail—We determined to embark immediately, and I had barely time to close my Letter for you, which went by the Yesterday’s Post—The Ship was laying about three Miles below the City, and we came on board, about 8...
Last Evening I received a letter from Mr William Wyer, (I suppose a brother of the Consul at Riga) dated the 4th: instant, at Bordeaux. He informs me that he embarked at New-York on the 24th: of October, in the Swedish Ship Gustaf Adolph, and arrived at Le Rochelle—This is the vessel by which the rumour at New-York of the capture of Drummond’s army, was brought—Mr: Wyer mentions it in his...
After an interval of considerable anxiety, arising from the lapse of time, since I had heard from my dearest friend, I was at length at once confirmed in my apprehensions, and in some sort relieved from their alarm by your letter of the 14th: which however I did not receive untill the Evening before last—The Washington Post Mark on the cover was dated the 15th: but, I had sent into Boston to...
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
My visit to Boston yesterday, was equally successful with those I had made several times before; for I found there your’s of the 9th: enclosing the profiles—I rejoyce to hear that your tour to Bladensburg has been of service to the health of the children—And I hope your visit to your aunt will prove equally so to them and to yourself. I sincerely sympathise with poor Pichon and his wife, at...
This extraordinary season has prevented all ideas of regular correspondence for few employments are so irksome as writing when the thermometer stands at 100, but it is so agreeable to receive letters from home that one endeavours to seize every opportunity to obtain them. Grandfather has been favoured lately with a visit from his highness the Duke of Saxe Weimar, a gentleman who intends soon...
Will you, and Mr. Adams attend my marriage which is to be on Thursday Eve. at the Duke of Wellington at 9 Oclock—he has just desired me to write, and say he shall be very happy to see you—as he is to give me away, he wishes it should be at his house— believe me my dear Mrs Adams—very truly / yours MHi : Adams Papers.
The day before Yesterday, I received the first of your Letters numbered by yourself—The number, 13, was exact, as you will see by my acknowledgments of the receipt of the twelve that preceded it; but in the date, 24 June, I apprehend there is a mistake—for your preceding Letter, number 12, which I received last Week was also dated 24. June; and then you had received neither of mine from...
Since the departure of Mr Gallatin, I am left here the only remnant of what was called the Congress of Ghent—Instead of the continual succession of Americans coming and going, I am now reduced to the Society of the hospitable Inhabitants of this City, and of Mr and Mrs: Smith—Instead of the painful suspense and expectation of irritating Notes, alternating with the anxious labours of replying...
Your Journals to the inclusive have been regularly received, and have become a sort of necessary of life to George and me—Whatever the Cause of the Confidence which you say you have but recently acquired of writing to me whatever comes into your head, as I am the principal gainer by the acquisition—hope it will be permanent—Your advice is always acceptable, and if I do not always profit by it,...
I congratulate you upon your safe arrival in the cold Regions of the North: to which I hope your constitution will get enured: you must borrow the ermin from the inhabitants of the forests, and wrap yourself in the furs which Nature has amply provided in those cold climates. How does my dear Boy Charles? I have learnt by way of young Mr Grey, that he was quite an amusement to them upon the...
I have nothing new to tell you from this place. I have no letter from you of later date than 25. Novr:—My purpose now besides enquiring how you and the children, are is to enclose the within from Kitty to Caroline. Our weather for some days past has been very bad—Snow-Hail-Rain and Sleet have followed one another in uninterrupted succession—It was so bad last Evening that the Ladies could not...
Your letter of the 16th: brought me consolation and hope in the information that you were all getting well—My anxiety on account of my mother has been extreme; having heard through Mr: Cranch & Mr: Quincy, that she had been very dangerously ill—I learn also that George is at Mr. Cranch’s I am still waiting for my Cause to be called in Court—It was called again the day before yesterday; but Mr:...
No letter from you, since that of 10. September, which I received, this day week—The next Post-day was Saturday, when there came one from Mr Harris of 14 September; but none from you. I have some apprehension, that on receiving mine of 19. August, and the newspaper accounts from England which must have reached you about the same time, you ceased writing to me, on the persuasion that I should...
I now enclose you the two bills, together with an order upon the Bank at Boston for their amount—which I hope will reach you by Christmas—You will see that the order is made payable to Mr: Shaw, who will receive and pay you the money.—I will thank you to get receipts upon the bills and forward them to me; as Mr: Hellen must have them. The party at Mr: Madison’s yesterday was almost entirely...
This is the last day of Sep’br, and the month is thus far expended, without my addressing a line to you in reply to your Letter of June 27th. I have now Seizd my pen, that the Swift winged hours, may no longer leave me your Debtor. By your Letter I learn that Mars and Belona, have quitted the Stage, to give place to Venus and Cupid, and the Loud Clangor of Arms, is lulled into a soft Hymanal...
After informing you by my last Letter of my arrival in this City, and of the Hotel where I had taken up my abode, I have suspended my Communications to you, under the expectation and the hope that you will have left St: Petersburg, before any further Letters from me could reach you there by the Post—Even that Letter may have to travel back after you as far as Riga, if you take your departure...
This day two hundred years our adventurous Ancestors landed at Plymouth—and two years hence will compete two hundred years since a more jolly company of them landed at Mount Wollaston—I have been made an honourary member of the new Plymouth Institution, and have been urged with warm invitations to go and Celebrate the day, and hear the Oratory of Mr Webster which I doubt not will be...
I left New-York last Thursday morning the 12th: at 9 O’Clock in the Packet Cordelia, the same we went in last October—Friday evening we reached Providence, after a short, but very boisterous passage—Yesterday, I came from Bost Providence to Boston, and here last Evening—Mr: Otis and Patty had been equally prosperous in their passage, and arrived in Boston last Monday, the eighth day after we...
On Thursday Morning Mr Rodda arrived here from St: Petersburg, which he had left on Monday Evening. He brought me a very kind letter from Mr Krehmer, enclosing two letters of Introduction, for Stockholm and Gothenburg, for which I am much obliged to him—I answer his letter by this Post, and beg you when you see him or Mrs Krehmer, to assure them how much I feel myself indebted to him for his...
Mr. William Willink (the father) of Amsterdam, with his Lady arrived here from England, the Evening before last—They have been upon a visit to one of their sons, who is settled at Liverpool, and after spending the Summer there, are now upon their return home—They dined with us yesterday, with Mr: and Mrs: Smith, and Mr: and Mrs: Meulemeester, and are to proceed this morning upon their journey....
Mr Rodde informs me that before he left St: Petersburg the twenty-five English Mails had arrived, from which I conclude that the Gulph of Bothnia has already been for some time passable—I now regret very much that I did not go by the way of Abo; for I should in all probability have been at this time in Stockholm; and here am I wind-bound, and ice-bound; and for ought I see likely to be so a...
Since you recommended writing to me, you have dropp’d the thread of the numbers of your Letters—That of 23. October, which I received as I was closing mine of last Tuesday, I have numbered 37. having left one number for that which I suppose to be waiting for me at the Post-Office of Dresden. It is the eighth day since we sent our last Note to the British Plenipotentiaries—Their reply to our...
Once more is the correspondence on the part of my best friend brought up from all arrears; as I received since my last your two letters, of the 16th: and 23d: ulto: both together—I hope we shall on neither side be in arrears again, as I still hold the purpose of leaving this place, at latest a fortnight from to-morrow—It will give me great pleasure to meet you at Baltimore; but I cannot...
do not think that I have not participated in your Joy, upon the Birth of your daughter, because I have not sooner congratulated you upon the event. Let it be to you cause of gratitude and thankfulness that you have reason to sing of Mercies, as you have abundent occasion to do, for The lives and Health of your two sons whom you left under the care and patronage of two of the best of Friends....
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature a germ of superstition, which has cost mankind very dear, and there is an other germ the love of finery, and which has done almost as much harm, and both have been employed with great sagacity by temperal and spiritual politicians to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
Your two Letters of 15 and 16. December were delivered to me yesterday Morning, and are numbers 51. and 52—The day before, I had received two from Mr Harris of December 14 and 21.—Harris always forwards his Letters by the way of Amsterdam; by which means they sometimes come quicker, though on the other hand they are sometimes delayed longer than yours which are forwarded directly, and which...
I received yesterday Morning your’s of 27. December number 54—and readily excuse the omission of a Letter on the Birth-day in the satisfaction of reflecting that you were at that time partaking in the celebration of a day memorable in the annals of Russia, as it will henceforth be memorable in those of our Country, and particularly memorable in the days of my life—It is yet for my Country to...
If my dear Mrs Adams does justice to herself, she must be sure that no one that ever knew her can forget her, or cease to love and admire her—time or distance has not lessened my affection or made me indifferent to the happiness of a friend so deservedly dear to my heart, I learn that Mr Adams is appointed to and is actually in London—I conclude you wd not remain in Petersburg I send this...
We have at length got through the argument on the Cause for which I came here. It was finished yesterday after having taken up nearly four days—The opinion of the Court will probably be given in the course of the week, and my intention is to leave this place, to-morrow week, which will be the 13th:—I depend therefore upon the pleasure of seeing you again at latest in three weeks from this day....