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I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that Mr. Randolph of Roanoke is in a state of insanity, and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr. Randolph has appeared through his whole Public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengeance without cause against...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that many Mr Randolph or Roanoke is in a state of insanity—and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr Randolph has appeared through his whole public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengence without cause...
I have received your journal to the 17th. April, which like all your other journals has afforded me a delicious entertainment though they contain so many lamentable historys Decaturs fall is an awfull event if their is anything awfull in this lower World— I have read Ivanhoe and there is nothing more awfull in that—my Taste Coincides with yours in this instance entirely—the divine Rebecca far...
I have received your Journal to the 22d March—and have read them with so much delight—that I long to receive those that are to come as far as the present day— Before I proceed to any other topic, I here comply with Mr Adams request—and inclose the Seal of his Mothers Arms—By the Greyhound for the Crest—and the Birds, I conclude her ancesters were Country squires and Sportsmen—whether the birds...
Mr. Calhoun’s best respects to Mrs. Adams, and he is happy to state, that on an examination of the case of Mr Boyd, he found he could with propriety make the allowance to him, which she desired. The 2d Auditor has been directed to Allow his Salary from the 1st Decr. 1819. Mrs Boyd letter is herewith returned MHi : Adams Papers.
If Nature in scattering her bounties had bestowed upon me the genius of a Poet or a Painter I would entertain you with a description of a scene of sublimity, beauty, and novelty, such as eighty four winters never before presented to my sight: when I arose in the morning, the Sun was rising, the heavens were not of Brass but the Sky was a vast concave of clear blue marble and the earth was of...
Mr Henry Warren, a Son of your late friend Dr John Warren—and a young lawyer of promising hopes is a bout to travel to Washington—and will have the honour to deliver you this letter—I hope you will receive him with the utmost cordiality, for his Name and Blood are very dear to me The last news we have from your Sons—was their visit to Mr Boyleston last Saturday—In fine health and Spirits—to...
yours to the 6th. is received, Our Sons of Harvard took leave of us this Morning for Cambridge in good health and Spirits—they arrived here the 16th. somewhat fatigued but very well—Their Uncle is gone to Boston with them to fit them out for Cambridge— I have this Morning learnt the death of my Patriarchal friend William Ellery in his 94th. year—which is a greater age than human Nature can...
I have this moment received your journal up to the 15th. of this Month—and I hasten to answer the last question in it Mr John Randolph certainly never wrote to me requesting letters of recommendation for any of his friends—And if any one has reported such a Slander of him, it is certainly very abusive—I cannot imagin who can have suggested such an idea to you—he would scorn the imputation with...
Mr Pinkney presents his Complements to Mr & Mrs Adams and will have the Honour to wait on them at Dinner on Thursday the 3d of February.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...
Compliments of the Season, and what is better prayers that you may enjoy the present year and as many future years as you can endure in health Peace and Competence—I congratulate you, on your having your Olive plants round about you—though the two Collegians have not been dutiful enough to send me a journal of their journey—nor an account of their arrival at their Paternal Mansion—a Residence...
As I take a great interest in your pleasures, and your troubles, your last Journal has given me a large share of both—the social scenes are delightful and the prospect of trouble is afflicting—I am interested too in the Journey of our Collegians who came here on Thursday—sett all the Tailors with their Needles in Motion—and on Saturday went to Boston with their Uncle who fitted them off with...
One Week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui, which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear, if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly, that the Eyes of all Europe were upon it—And it may be safely said that the Eyes of all Europe, and of all America, North and...
one week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear—if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly that the Eyes of all Europe were upon them it—and it may be safely said that the eyes of all Europe, and of all America North...
I can hardly believe my Eyes when I look upon your letter of the 13th. of October at Philadelphia, and recollect that it has not been acknowledged; and the comfortable intelligence of your safe arrival in that City, ought not to have been so long forgotten: Since that time, we have no intelligence from your family except a letter from Master Charles, to Master Thomas, by which I am happy to...
Je viens d’apprendre avec bien du plaisir bonne et aimable dame que nous vous verrions bientôt ici, et j’espère pour vous un temps un peu moins accáblant que celui qu’il a fait durant notre voyage, dont l’itinéraire seroit, nous avons grillé tant de jours à Philadelphie, tant à Baltimore, et tant sûr les chemins, cette manière d’aller m’a un peu fatiguée et tellement que Je ne suis pas fâchée...
With no less gratitude than astonishment I have received your Alcibiades,—and your Sons shall have it—but I am really concerned for your Health. How it is possible that a Gay Lady of Washington amidst all the ceremony’s, frivolity’s, and gravities, of a Court, and of a Legislature—Can find time to write so many and so excellent Letters to me; to her Children, and at the same time, translate...
I have received yours of the 3d.—I can only say if Susan will return to me with her Child and live in my complicated Family—she will be welcome to my heart—I will protect her at all hazards, as long as I live, and I will keep peace in my house, as long as I shall have the means, and the power—she must return to me, and there must not and shall not be family bickerings— Your Children have given...
Human Life has been to me a State of trial from my Cradle to this seventh month of my Eaighty fourth year.— I believe enough of the Apocalypse to be perfectly convinced—“that “be thou faithful unto the death, and thou shalt receive a Crown of Life.”— Susan may depend upon it that her Mother, her Sister, her Brother in Law, her Female Associates in Quincy, and its neighbourhood, have been more...
Your last journal has so much Philosophy, and Religion, in it—that I am convinced you are a sincere inquirer after truth—God bless and Prosper you in the pursuit.— I am Informed by your Son—my dear Name Sake—that you propose to be here by the first of July—I pray you to be sure—that you arrive hear before that day.—bring your Husband with you—If the President can wander round the Universe and...
your Journal interesting to me like all the former, has been received up to the 29th of March.— The people of this Country when they are prejudiced against a Man, or a Name,—will not suffer him to take the least notice of any of his relations, however distant—tho their merits and service’s may have been ever so great—but when they are prejudiced in favour of a Man, or a Name they will applaud...
your journals grow more and more entertaining and instructive—you ask my Opinion of General Jackson—and you shall have it—Hero and a Conqueror I cannot say that he has transgressed the Law of Nations in any one point—certainly neither Spain nor England has any right to complain; if he has transgressed any punctilios of the Constitution neither Spain nor England have anything to do with...
Your three last journals are three Pearls—I have not been able to thank you for either—untill now, they bear the form and impression of the age—they let me into the Characters of Statesmen, Politicians, Orators, Pacts, Courtiers, Convivialists, dancers Dandy’s and above all, of Ladies of whom I should no Nothing, without your kind assistance—I am a little surprised at the depth of your...
Your journal up to the 20th. has as usual given me much pleasure and information; it shows very sufficiently that the great exertions which your situation demands of you, have exhausted your strength and rendered a relaxation absolutely necessary for you; I rejoice therefore that Congress have but three or four days to live; and when that body expires you will be at liberty; and when that body...
Your journal ending 13th feb has given me a mixture of allarm and delight, allarm for your health and delight in your reflections. Mr. Jeffersons advice to translate the friendly epistle Don Onis and Mr. Irving into French and send them to Europe made me laugh outright—the expectation from Mr. Madison of a condemnation of his friend Monroe made me smile—but the threat to apply to me to condemn...
I thank you for your journals and pray you to continue them for they are a refreshing amusement to me in my desolation and solitude for such is my real condition through your three Sons visit me commonly once a week and cheer my drooping spirits and although my neighbours and friends are universally kind to me and solace my sorrows as much as they can and what is much more even my enemies seem...
My negligence about writing to you has arisen not so much from the want of something to say as from the number of materials which I found in my mind for a long letter—. in despair of ever finding time to say all that I have at various times wish’d to—it is my conclusion to give you only the thoughts of the passing moment—the minister of State can scarcely number up— more daily employments than...
Your Journal to the 20th has Sett me on fire. Give my respectfull Compliments to Mr Clay and tell him that I Sincerely Unite with You—in Your request that he would bring in a Bill to Settle the Ettiquette of the United States. The debates in Congress Upon that important Subject, will amuse, divert, instruct and edify me to the End of my Life. I pitty Mrs Monroe; I pitty Mrs H; but above all I...
your Letter has given me great delight Mrs Monroe has done herself great honour, and a durable Service to her Country, by the Example She has Sett by reversing the System of dissipation of her Predecessor. Madam Bingham and the Queen of France are not proper Models for a “Presidante” of the U.S. I most cordially approve of your Plan and that of your husband They wish him to Spend whole Nights...
Your letters dear Mrs Adams have been very much neglected apparently by me—but my confidence in your knowledge of the cause of it has prevented any uneasiness on my part on this account—My mind & heart have formed constant occupation for the last month at Quincy & it—is yet difficult for me to fall into the train of the common & ordinary occurences of life— I too have met with a loss—which...
Mrs. Adams remains very much the same not worse than the two days past—we have still hopes Another letter on Wednesday— MHi : Adams Papers.
Your mother was pronounced so much better this morning that your father has resumed his book—or rather he is at ease enough to be read to—Mrs Greenleaf has come in to amuse him with the news of the day which gives me a few moments to write to you, Caroline, & to your children—As Mrs Adams gains a little strength she continues to interest herself in her affairs again—to day she desired I might...
On monday my dear Mrs. Adams I came here as was my intention when my note to you was finished on that day—Your mother was lower than I had expected—on tuesday She was better—I sat the night of that day by her side it was a restless one—Mrs. Dexter remain’d in the room till 12 o’clock after that the hours passed off more favorably & the Dr. prounced her—better but told me the struggle was great...
Since the 18th July, I have not received a Line from you or my Son, altho I have been in daily expectation of hearing that you were sitting your faces this way. I have learnt from mr Cruft that mr Adams contemplated being here, as I understood him by the last of this Month, or sooner if he could. The intercourse between us, is not so frequent as I could wish. Even tho it consisted of “How do...
I received Your Letter of July 18th on Saturday 25th. It was a great damper to me, who had been pleasing myself with the expectation of Soon Seeing you, and my Son—nor can I now relinquish the hope, that the impediments you mention, may be so accommodated as to give mr Adams a few weeks respite at least. From the account you give of your health, I Should think you would be benefited: by a...
I have not yet acknowledged your favour of June 27th I go so seldom into the buisy world, that I can get little to amuse or entertain you with. Harriet too is yet with her Sister. She always had something of foreign or domestic to amuse us with—I miss her much, and that upon the Childrens account, as well as my own—The fourth of July has past with much Eclat, and good humour in Boston, with an...
I had the pleasure to rcve your Request for a few articls from Canton which I have orderd—I thank you Madam for your Congratulations on the Marrage of my Son he requsts me to present to you his best Respects as Dos also Mrs. Bentzan & my Daughter I have the Honnor to be / Most Respetfully— / Madam your obd Set MHi : Adams Papers.
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
My correspondence has been much interrupted the last fortnight Susan has been So feeble and weak, that She has required much care and attention She is now but just able to leave her Chamber, and that only for a short time, and we have had ten days of dismal wet weather, in which the Sun has not once Shone,—it has produced much Sickness, of the Quincy and Croup kind, with Children—My Son T B As...
I received your Letter of March 2d which has increased my anxiety to hear again from you, for a series of misfortunes Seem to have clustered around you. pray inform me how mrs Frye her Husband and Children are? I scarcly expect to hear the last are living. what a Scene you had to pass through? I do not wonder you were Sick—That Erysipelas which has Several times troubled you, is a very...
Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
I have received your letter of the 13th. instant, accompanied by a Copy of one to Mr Pope. In answer, am induced to make the following observations: Mr. Hanson’s reasons for wishing Mr Adams to join in the recovery of Sands, the joint property of the heirs of Wallace Johnson & mine, I am unaccquainted with, but as I have understood, he himself is likely to be involved in a dispute with the...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
I received yesterday your journal to the 21st of Jan’ry. Washington Seems to be in a whirpool of dissipation—well described by Scott in his tales of my Landlord—“a chase through Life, after follies not worth catching; and when caught successively thrown away; a chase pursued from days of tottering infancy to old Age—Toys and merry makings in Childhood, Love and its absurdities in youth....
I received your journal No 4. containing the drawing Room History, which amused us much. What would have been Said in my day, if So much Style, pomp and Etiquette had been assumed? the Cry of Monarchy, Monarchy, would have resounded from Georgia to Maine.—but according to the old proverb—some persons may Rob; better than others look over the hedge.—I am not condemning this new order of...
I this morning received Your Second Letter, by way of journal. we have all been highly entertaind. it makes me a Sharer with you, in your various occupations—brings me acquainted with Characters, and places me at your fire Side. one Single Letter conveys more information in this way, than I could obtain in a whole Session of Congress.—I hope you will continue this method altho you will receive...
I have been haunted with the Deamon of omission, and a hundred Sprights in the garb of excuses, Such as Company, family avocations Noisy Boys &c &c This morning, being very Stormy, I determined to expel them all, and commence writing a Letter to you. I beleive I had promised to write to my Son. I know that he must be so enveloped in publick Buisness, that he can ill afford time to attend to...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...
A long period has elapsed since I addrest a line to you—I have not taken my pen for three weeks—I have been so constantly occupied with my visitors, and a sick domestic, who has been near dieing with a Billious fever the whole time my Friends were with me, that I could not find a leisure moment. mr & mrs DeWint his Mother their children and servants left us last week, about the time when...