You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John Quincy
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
Results 1-50 of 219 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I write you without knowing where or when my Letter will find you, and must therefore I must omit much of what I wish to say to you—I received this Morning your Letter of the 21st. (Monday) from Lebanon, and its enclosure I suppose of the same day—but it was post marked Northampton the 23d—It is evident that when you wrote it, you had not received my Letter of the 17th. proposing to meet you...
I have concluded to part with George, at the very moment when he is most needful to me—I have made this sacrifice, yielding to your wishes, and shall endeavour to do this business relating to the Execution of my father’s Will, myself—He will follow you to Lebanon, or wherever he may learn on the road you are to be found—He goes with his Cousin the Cadet, who is upon his return to his duty at...
I have received your Letters of the 13th. and 14th from Lebanon, and rejoice with exceeding joy at the recovery of your health—From other Letters received here I learn that you intended to remain at Lebanon, only a very few days, and I scarcely know whether this will find you there My Letter of the 17th. which I hope you will receive this day will inform you of Mr Boyleston’s affectionate...
I have just received your Letter from Ballston, with the greater pleasure, as it gives a better account of your health, than that of the 7th. instt. from Cedar Grove. I am also glad to perceive that you had met Dr Hurtt, and no doubt received from him the Letter which I wrote you by him, from Boston—I have since written twice to you, and once to Charles, and addressed the Letters to Lebanon,...
Yesterday your Letter of the 3d. instt. from Fishkiln came to hand—It would have been altogether cheering had it given me a better account of your health—But I hear the Lebanon Springs much vaunted, and hope they will prove beneficial to you— I fear Dr. Huntt passed through Lebanon, too soon for the delivery to you of my Letter by him—But supposing you to have arrived there yesterday or this...
I received last Evening your Letter of the 1st. instt. from New York—I now enclose to you the Letter which I had wriiten you, on the 25th. of Last Month; and which was forwarded to Mr Charles King in the hope that it would meet you at New York—I wrote you also at Boston Wednesday Morning by Dr Huntt—He was to pass through Lebanon yesterday or this day, but I am afraid will again miss meeting...
Meeting here Dr. Huntt, who informs us that he left you last Friday at Bordentown, and Charles the next day at New York, I avail myself of the opportunity of saying to you that we are here well. I hope you have received the Letter which was enclosed to Mr Charles King, under the expectation that it would meet you in New–York—Yesterday, my father’s Will was proved by Mr Quincy and myself—We...
I have but this moment received your Letter of the 18th. and hope that before leaving Washington you received mine of the 16th. advising you not to come on here for the present. Supposing however that it may have been otherwise, and that you did leave Washington last Saturday, I write this with the hope that it may find you at New York—I repeat the advice that you would go for health or...
I have duly received your kind Letters of 11. 12 and 16 instt—I wrote to you at New–York and on the 14th. and 16th. from this place—the last by Thomas Hellen—Since then I have been so much occupied in making the arrangements for the disposal of my father’s Estate, but three fourths of my time has been absorbed by Company—Not a day passes without visitors, and after nine O’Clock in the Morning...
Thomas Hellen was here last Evening and goes to–morrow Morning for Washington—I furnished him with sixty dollars to defray the expenses for which I took an order upon Mr T. Cook—George has paid for him 125 dollars quarterly; but his expenses have exceeded that sum and he has contracted some debts which must be paid,—not considerable I hope. We shall begin tomorrow to make the arrangements for...
We arrived on Wednesday Evening at Boston, and yesterday Morning came out here. The weather until last Evening was the very extremity of the Season, but has now turned cool—All here are well—George came out with us from Boston—You have doubtless received the Letters from Mr Quincy and from George, written after my fathers decease, and have seen the copy of my father’s will—I propose to accept...
We arrived safe here, about two hours since, and in two hours more expect to be on our way to Providence in the Steam Boat.Mr John Sergeant came on with us thus far, from Philadelphia—I have met every where a kind and Sympathetic feeling—Here we have seen Mr. G. Sullivan, Mr C. King and Mr Blunt—As you will remember me this day, I have determined to shew you that I need not to be reminded of...
It was as I had apprehended—On our arrival this morning at Merrill’s, we were informed by him that my father expired at 5 in the afternoon of the 4th. instt. and on reaching this place the New–York Evening Post of Friday was put into my hands, containing the proceedings of the Governor and council of Massachusetts, and of the board of Aldermen, of Boston upon the Event—You are no doubt ere...
Your journalizing Letters, my dearest friend, from the 18th. to the 23d. have been received—And are most of all welcome, for assuring me of your continued convalescence; and of the benefit you are deriving from the waters—In your Letter of the 22d. Tuesday, you ask that the Carriage should set out next Tuesday, to meet you at Hagerstown—But on the next day you speak of passing another week ,...
Since Johnson Hellen departed, last Sunday, I have been moping in Solitude; but the day after he went away, I was made light-hearted by the receipt of your two Letters of the 9th. and 11th. instt. which came together—I suppose Johnson is by this time with you; but I dont know whether that will stimulate or dispel John’s home sickness—The week from the time when you left me, was one of the...
The day after your departure, Johnson Hellen came down from Rockville, and has been a pleasant companion to me till now. I rejoiced to learn from him that you had not suffered by the heavy rain that came on before you reached Rockville; and that you had proceeded to next Morning in health and good Spirits towards Frederick. But nine days have since passed away, and I have not a line either...
We have an interesting question whether by the “middle of the week” which in your Journal of last Saturday you mentioned as the time when you expected to reach home, you intended the middle of this week or of the next—If of the present it is already here; but then your last Journal which is of Tuesday, was written in expectation of hearing from one, which you doubtless did the next Morning. I...
Your Letter and Journal to the 3d. have come to hand. If I should give you the reasons why I cannot go and spend a week at Philadelphia to shew my friends there how much I long to be President, you would think them very ridiculous, and me not less so for detailing them—My friends at Philadelphia, are not the only ones who send me kind messages to inform me that unless I mend my manners, I...
Your last Journals yet received, are of the 23d (last Monday) from Border Town—You were then engaged for Wednesday, at Mrs Lenox’s and I had concluded you would return to Philadelphia on Thursday—Yesterday therefore, and again this day, I was expecting a Letter from you, after your return. But Thursday came on here, what we take for the equinoctial Storm, and it is hardly yet over—If it came...
Your journal of the 16th. 17th. and 18th. from Bordentown was doubly grateful, for being unexpected—I am delighted to learn that you have been passing your time so agreeably; particularly as it was relaxation so necessary to you after so much confinement at Philadelphia. We have been called again to the House of Mourning, and on Friday attended the funeral of Mrs Macomb, at Georgetown. She...
No Journal received this day—But there was one yesterday, and I hope for one to-morrow—We have had now a week of heat as oppressive as any of the whole Summer, and two or three of the Nights have been more so. Though I have no doubt, you find it equally insupportable at Philadelphia, it reconciles me to your stay there; because I would have you come home to a temperate climate, as well as to...
The day before yesterday after an anxious interval of two days without a line from you, brought me your Letter announcing your confinement to your chamber by the visit of that Saint far famed for the success of his Sermons to the fishes. I hope he has not taken offence at my partiality for the fisherman , and resolved to avenge my attachment to them upon you—If Dr Physick can give a final...
Yesterday afternoon at four, we performed the last sad offices of mortality to the remains of Mr. Josiah Meigs—It was but the Sunday week before, that happening accidentally to attend the Morning worship at the second Presbyterian Church I had seen him there ordained a Ruling Elder —He was suddenly seized yesterday was a week, immediately after returning early in the morning from Alexandria,...
Your journals down to the 30th of August inclusive are received; and this day the memoirs of Lord Waldegrave for George—It comes quite apropos; for we are now all enjoying the Memoirs of Horace Walpole embracing the same and a longer period, Lord Holland the Editor of this latter work sent a copy of it most magnificently bound as a present to the President who has been kind enough to lend it...
Joseph has arrived safe with the Carriage and horses. Your journal of the 24th. and 25th. was doubly agreeable, after the interval of suspension, by the good tidings it gave of your brother—May his convalescence prove permanent. I had received a Letter from Mr Connell since his arrival in this Country and a promise of a visit which I am expecting from him—Connell told you of all the writers in...
Instead of four 5 dollar bills, I enclose you a draft, payable to your order , on a Bank in Philadelphia—I am a little shy of entrusting to the Mail Bank Bills payable to the bearer —for they are more apt than all others to make themselves wings and fly away—A draft which will not be paid without your endorsement is safer. We have had a little, but very little rain, and it comes too late to...
All your journals have been duly received, and I should not have failed writing to you for the exception which absorbs all my leisure—When I first began the remarks upon Jonathan’s duplicata , I told you it was to me an affair of more than life and death, and so it is still—The plot has been seven years hatching, and its whole history has not yet been told. Your advice to treat all...
An interval of three days without a Letter from you had me, and I find by your Journal to the 15th. yesterday received that it was not without reason—I hope your health will not suffer by a Summer residence in Philadelphia Mr and Mrs. Smith arrived here, the Evening before last from Pensacola—Johnson Hellen left us on Wednesday Morning to return to Rockville I wrote you last Monday Morning...
Your Journals to the inclusive have been regularly received, and have become a sort of necessary of life to George and me—Whatever the Cause of the Confidence which you say you have but recently acquired of writing to me whatever comes into your head, as I am the principal gainer by the acquisition—hope it will be permanent—Your advice is always acceptable, and if I do not always profit by it,...
I enclose you a Letter from Mrs Frye—upon whom I called last Evening—Mr Frye doubts whether he will have it in his power to make his Northern excursion this year—I conclude that even if you go to Quincy, you will not leave Philadelphia, so soon as Thursday and accordingly continue writing to you at that place— I did suffer much for some time from excessive heat—But the cool weather has...
Your Journal of 31st. July and 1st. instt. is received. I enclose you another Check for 100 Dollars, that you may be payable want of funds, if you should finally conclude to go on to Quincy—But besides the doubts which are mentioned in your Letter, arising from the situation of your brother, I have others since I have this day learnt that the yellow fever is in New-York—my fathers invitation...
I continue to receive your journals—that of the 29th. was the last; and they would continue to be most agreeable, if they all gave cheering accounts of your brother—Count de Manon called on me yesterday and told me he had seen your brother last week; and thought he looked not worse but if any thing he thought rather better than he had a fortnight before. Tuesday Evening we had a party at Dr...
Your journal of the 24th. and 25th. has been received—The complaint of cold, and the want of winter Clothes, almost makes me stare; though even here we have had two or three more moderate days— I give you an extract of a Letter which I have this morning from my father— “If you cannot come on yourself, I wish Mrs Adams would, and bring with her, her Brother Johnson.—The air of Quincy Sea, and...
Another number of your journal came to hand this day—I mark your advice, to say nothing more upon the subject of the “diplomatic controversy,” and I am much inclined that way myself—I have no desire to put him down lower than he has put himself; but the opinions upon objects of great interest, avowed and urged in his Letters want putting down, much more than the man—And I have written what...
Your delightful journal of Friday and Saturday has just come to hand—What diverts me most in it, is the regular Saturday Night’s indisposition of the Horses— The heat here on Saturday was almost suffocating—Since then it has been more supportable, but is yet very oppressive—A furlough of six weeks would be delicious to me—but you know some of my reasons for not taking it this year—I am weary...
We continue to be delighted almost daily with your journalizing Letters—which together with our visits to the theatre, enliven the dulness of our half–solitude—Scarcely a day passes indeed but I have new visitors at my Office; but they all merely candidates for Office, and though of course all persons of extraordinary merit, their conversation has no tendency to make or keep one cool, in these...
On the back of my last Letter, I acknowledged the receipt of yours of the 14th. and yesterday came your delightful Journal of the next day—I am charmed to find that you meet with so many friends and acquaintance at Philadelphia; and much more so that Dr Physick, has satisfied himself that there is no dropsy in your case. Commodore Rodgers called on me this Morning to say he was going for...
I thank you for your affectionate remembrance of my birthday—We passed it as pleasantly as circumstances would admit at Mr Frye’s; but I was not very well that day and was more than usually overpowered by the heat—On returning home too we were caught in a thunder–shower and throughly drenched. The Metropolis is daily thinning off—The Secretary of the Navy and family are gone—The President goes...
Receiving on Sunday your rebuke for the blank covers I had forwarded to you, I should have felt it more severely had I not concluded that about the same hour you would be receiving from me the proof that I had not been altogether so remiss as you had supposed. We have had since the beginning of the month such a succession of roasters, day and night that I have felt myself almost reduced to the...
Receiving on Sunday your rebuke for the blank covers I had forwarded to you, I should have it more severely had I not concluded that about the same hour you would be receiving from me the proof that I had not been altogether so remiss as you had supposed. We have had since the beginning of the month such a succession of roasters, day and night that I have felt myself almost reduced to the...
I have received since I wrote you last two letters from you but cannot learn directly from either of them whether you had received my number 1. Yesterday the National birth day was kept here in small style. It rained great part of the day and yet the heat was melting—At the Capitol Dr Watkins read the Declaration, and Mr Hawley made a prayer. The dinner at Strothers was thinly attended but the...
I have received since I wrote you last, two Letters from you, but cannot learn directly from either of them whether you had received my number 1. Yesterday the national birthday was kept here in small Style. It rained great part of the day; and yet the heat was melting—At the Capitol Dr. Watkins ready the Declaration, and Mr Hawley made a prayer—The dinner at Strother’s was thinly attended,...
I received your Letters written in the Steam Boat, and that from Philadelphia—The immediate decision of Dr Physick upon the case of your brother, is doubtless the best thing that could have happened, and I hope the operation when effected, will not be so severe as you apprehend—I believe it is usually considered as safe, when skilfully performed, and have known several cases in which it was...
On arriving here yesterday, I had the pleasure of receiving your Letter of last Sunday from New-York by which I learnt the prospect of recovering the missing baggage— I found all well at home, but there is yet considerable disease in the City; and the yellow fever is said to be at Alexandria. Antoine says you sent him an order to get a grate for the chamber over head; but he cannot find one...
I have received your Letters of the 9th and 10th. and am able now only to ask you not to be disappointed if I should not reach Dedham next Saturday as I have proposed. The day before yesterday I was obliged to send an Express to the President, who is at Shannondale Springs—His answer might have obliged me to put off my visit to the North entirely—The Express has just returned—I cannot start...
Your Letter of the 3d. instt. only reached me yesterday—You reason exceedingly well both upon my real character, and upon that of which I have unfortunately got the reputation—I always receive with deference your counsel which I know to be generally judicious, and invariably intended in kindness to me—On the present occasion however, I have many special reasons for the request in my former...
Yesterday I received your Journal to the 27th. and landing you at Quincy—It would have put me quite in Spirits, but for the concluding paragraph which is alarming—My intention is to leave this City the 20th. or 21st.—If my calculations are correct you may send the Carriage to take me up at Dedham about or a little before Sunset on Saturday the 25th.—If it does not find me there it may wait for...
Your two Letters of Journal from New-York were duly received and afforded me much amusement—The illness of the Coachman came so mal àpropos, that I believe you determined upon the best thing that could be done, including to go in a Packet to Providence—I hope you have long before this safely arrived at Quincy, and that the health of all has been recruited by the Journey. Among the Strangers...
Your Letters from Philadelphia of the 15th and 16th. have come to hand—From the last of them I hope you are by this hour. (6 in the Evening) at New–York. I answered your Letter from Wilmington, by a short one which I hope will overtake you at New–York— Major Grahame from Frederick has been here these three days with Coll. M Pherson a friend of his who wishes to obtain a warrant of Midshipman...
I received this morning your Letter from Wilmington, delighted to learn that you had got well on thus far—I send this to catch you at New-York—We are all as comfortably well as we can be without you—Antoine seems pretty well recovered. I got a Letter from W. S. Smith off Cape Henry, dated the 8th. Catherine had had a spice of Sea Sickness and got over it—W. D. Robinson by missing time had...