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Jno. Adams Esqr. To Daniel Smith Dr. 1775 £  s d May 13th. To Bottle Brandy 2 6 26. To Bottle do. 2 6 July 10. To Quart Spirits 2
John Adams Esqr. B ough t of J. Young Junr. 1775 June 14. To a new Pad and Double raind Curb Bridle £  14 6 15. Mendg. an old Bridle 1 July 3. To a Cover for sword Scabboard 3 14. To a small pad for housings 2
Mr. John Adams  Dr.  To Mrs. Yard. 1775 Augt. 1st. To your Board & Lodging from the 10th May to this day 11 1/2 Wks.à 30s. per Wk. £17: 5 To your Servants Board for 7 Wks. 4 days à 15s. 5: 12: 6 To your Proportion to the Parlour and Candles 11 1/2 Wks. à 4s. 2: 6 To your proportion of the Liquor 13: 10 £38: 13: 6 38
1775 £ s d June 28 To hay for two Horses 3/ Oats 2/ 5: 29 To Ditto to July 2d. 3 days hay 9/ Oats 9/ 18: July 2 To hay 3/ Oats 1/4 4: 4 3 To ditto 3/ Oats 1/4 4: 4
The Honble. John Adams Esqr. to Saml. Cook Dr. 1775 Augst. 24th. To Boarding your Lady & Self 3 days £0: 12: To 3 days Keeping yr. Horse 3: £0: 15: The Honble. John Adams to Samll. Cooke junr. Dr. To boardg: 6 days @ 2/ £0: 12. 0 To breakfasting & dining 4 persons @ 9/ 3. To keeping your horse 4 nights @ 1/
Mr. John Adams To Jacob Beninghove s d To 1 Carrot pigtail Tobacco 2 6 To 6 lb. Cutt Do. @ 12d per lb. 6 0 To Earthen pott 0 4 8 10 M-Ar : vol. 210; accompanied by a duplicate; neither is receipted.
To Cleaning a pistol 0: 2: 0 To one side pin 0: 0: 9 To two small screws to the Lock 0: 1: 0 To a new tumbler to ..... Do. 0: 3: 0 £0: 6: 9 M-Ar
 At the Rising Sun in Second Street between Market and Chestnut Streets. 2 ozs. Cinnamon £0: 6: 0 1 oz. Turkey Rhubarb 2: 6 1 oz. Cloves 2: 1 oz. Pink Root 1: £  11: 6 M-Ar : vol. 210. A printed form filled in.
£ s d Novr. 29 For washing of Seven doz. and 4 pieces of Lining at 3/6 per doz 1 5 4 For mending 0 3 9 1 9 1 M-Ar : vol. 210. Endorsed by JA .
John Adams Esqr. To John Stille Dr. 1775 June 24th.  To makeing Suit of Nankeen 0: 6: 0  3 3/4 Y ard s of Linnen @ 3/6 0: 13: 1 1/2  Buttons 0: 2: 7  Thread 1/6 Silk 3/ hair 2/ Buckram /3 Staying 1/6 0:
John Adams Esqr. Bought of R. Aitken 1775 Decr. 8 To 3 red Memdm. books @ 1/3 3 9 To 2 Sticks Sealing wax 1/ 2 To Marshall Saxe’s Reveries I paid to Mrs. Hall for you 13 To 1 Sett political Disquisitions 3 Vols. 1 10   0 18 9 N.B. I am not certain whither it was the Political Disquisitions or some other book you had from me, when you got them you proposed paying me but for want of Change at...
Jno. Adams Dr. s d 1775 To Club Venison Dinner 10 10 2 Bottles Cyder 2 S 12 10 M-Ar : vol. 210. Date supplied from an entry in JA ’s Account with Massachusetts, Aug.–Dec. 1775 , above.
To Board from Septr. 12 to Decr. 8 at 30s. per Week 18: 17: 0 To a Servants Board for same Time at 15s. per Week 9: 8: 6 To Clubb in Punch and Wine at Dinner and in your own Room 11: 0: 0 To Sperma Ceti Candles at .05s. per Week 3: 0: 0 To Firewood for 8 Weeks at 7s: 6 per Week 1: 10: 0
If I was sure your absence to day was occasioned, by what it generally is, either to wait upon Company, or promote some good work, I freely confess my Mind would be much more at ease than at present it is. Yet this uneasiness does not arise from any apprehension of Slight or neglect, but a fear least you are indisposed, for that you said should be your only hindrance. Humanity obliges us to be...
You was pleas’d to say that the receipt of a letter from your Diana always gave you pleasure. Whether this was designed for a complement, (a commodity I acknowledg that you very seldom deal in) or as a real truth, you best know. Yet if I was to judge of a certain persons Heart, by what upon the like occasion passess through a cabinet of my own, I should be apt to suspect it as a truth. And why...
I think myself greatly indebted to you, for the honor you do my judgment, in refering so important a debate to my decission; and I ought, in strict justice, to apologize for my not answering it before; however, I trust to your Candor to excuse the seeming neglect, I say seeming, for I have not been unmindful of you, but have well consider’d the thing, and shall give you my thoughts upon the...
How do you now? For my part, I feel much easier than I did an hour ago, My Unkle haveing given me a more particuliar, and favorable account of the Small pox, or rather the operation of the preparation, than I have had before. He speaks greatly in favor of Dr. Perkins who has not, as he has heard lost one patient. He has had since he has been in Town frequent opportunities of visiting in the...
If our wishes could have conveyed you to us, you would not have been absent to Day. Mr. Cranch and my Sister have been here, where they hoped to have found you. We talk’d of you, they desire to be rememberd to you, and wish you well thro the Distemper. Mr. Cranch told me that the Deacon with his children design for Boston next Saturday and that they propose going by water—that the Deacon would...
Here am I all alone, in my Chamber, a mere Nun I assure you, after professing myself thus will it not be out of Character to confess that my thoughts are often employ’d about Lysander, “out of the abundance of the Heart, the mouth speaketh,” and why Not the Mind thinketh. Received the pacquet you so generously bestowed upon me. To say I Fasted after such an entertainment, would be wronging my...
Mr. Cranch informs me that Hones will go to Town tomorrow, and that I may not miss one opportunity, have now taken my pen to thank you for yours by Tom, and also for that which I have just now received by Mr. Ayres. You seem in high Spirits at which you know I rejoice. Your minute description of the persons you have seen, are very entertaining to me. I cannot consent you should omit writing,...
I think I write to you every Day. Shall not I make my Letters very cheep; don’t you light your pipe with them? I care not if you do, tis a pleasure to me to write, yet I wonder I write to you with so little restraint, for as a critick I fear you more than any other person on Earth, and tis the only character, in which I ever did, or ever will fear you. What say you? Do you approve of that...
Why my good Man, thou hast the curiosity of a Girl. Who could have believed that only a slight hint would have set thy imagination a gig in such a manner. And a fine encouragement I have to unravel the Mistery as thou callest it. Nothing less truly than to be told Something to my disadvantage. What an excellent reward that will be? In what Court of justice did’st thou learn that equity? I...
Your Friendly Epistle reach’d me a fryday morning, it came like an Infernal Mesenger, thro fire and Brimstone, Yet it brought me tidings of great joy. With gratitude may this month be ever rememberd by Diana. You have been peculiarly favourd, and may be numberd with those who have had the distemper lightest. What would I give that I was as well thro it. I thank you for your offerd Service, but...
Your desire that I would write every Opportunity is punctually observed by me, And I comply with your request, altho I have nothing more to say than How do ye? and when will you return? These questions perhaps may appear trifling to others, yet to me they are matters of the highest importance. The Doctor just now sent me your Epistle, and word, that tho he had smoked it, yet he had not read a...
Welcome, Welcome thrice welcome is Lysander to Braintree, but ten times more so would he be at Weymouth, whither you are afraid to come.—Once it was not so. May not I come and see you, at least look thro a window at you? Should you not be glad to see your Diana? I flatter myself you would. Your Brother brought your Letter, tho he did not let me see him, deliverd it the Doctor from whom...
I am much obliged to you for the care you have taken about help. I am very willing to submit to some inconveniences in order to lessen your expences, which I am sensible have run very high for these 12 months past and tho you know I have no particuliar fancy for Judah yet considering all things, and that your Mamma and you seem to think it would be best to take her, I shall not at present look...
When I wrote you by the Doctor I was in hopes that I should have been out the next day, but my disorder did not leave me as I expected and I am still confind extreemly weak, and I believe low spirited. The Doctor encourages me, tells me I shall be better in a few days. I hope to find his words true, but at present I feel, I dont know how, hardly myself. I would not have the Cart come a tuesday...
The Doctor talks of Setting out tomorrow for New Braintree. I did not know but that he might chance to see you, in his way there. I know from the tender affection you bear me, and our little one’s that you will rejoice to hear that we are well, our Son is much better than when you left home, and our Daughter rock’s him to Sleep, with the Song of “Come pappa come home to Brother Johnny.” Sunday...
I have very little of a political, or of any other kind of entertainment to give you. Yet I cannot omit a few lines, however small an expression they may be, sir, of my esteem and regard for you. The apprehensions of a war, the delay of Commerce, the distress of individuals, and the liberal expences of public treasure have at length ended in this—after a negociation of four months—that the...
I have just returned from an agreable excursion, in the course of which I had the pleasure of receiving your favour of April last, with that of Mrs. Adams, for each of which I beg leave to return my thanks. I am sorry to find that you have deserted Boston. You plead as an excuse, sir, “the load of public and private care, which oppress’d you.” But you would have pleased me better, if instead...
Alass! How many snow banks devide thee and me and my warmest wishes to see thee will not melt one of them. I have not heard one Word from thee, or our Little ones since I left home. I did not take any cold comeing down, and find my self in better Health than I was. I wish to hear the same account from you. The Time I proposed to tarry has Elapsed. I shall soon be home sick. The Roads at...
Mr. Warren being prevented by many Avocations from writing this Morning, has put the pen into the hand of his substitute: who with him presents sincere Regards to Mr. and Mrs. Adams. Lets them know they have been Repeatedly disappointed in not seeing them at Plimouth. Shall not pretend to Deliniate the painful Ideas that arise on a survey of the Evils Brought on this much injure’d Country by...
I know not where this will find you whether upon the road, or at Phylidelphia, but where-ever it is I hope it will find you in good Health and Spirits. Your Journey I immagine must have been very tedious from the extreem heat of the weather and the dustiness of the road’s. We are burnt up with the drouth, having had no rain since you left us, nor is there the least apperance of any. I was much...
The great distance between us, makes the time appear very long to me. It seems already a month since you left me. The great anxiety I feel for my Country, for you and for our family renders the day tedious, and the night unpleasent. The Rocks and quick Sands appear upon every Side. What course you can or will take is all wrapt in the Bosom of futurity. Uncertainty and expectation leave the...
I am very impatient to receive a letter from you. You indulged me so much in that Way in your last absence, that I now think I have a right to hear as often from you as you have leisure and opportunity to write. I hear that Mr. Adams wrote to his Son and the Speaker to his Lady, but perhaps you did not know of the opportunity. Suppose you have before this time received two letters from me, and...
Five Weeks have past and not one line have I received. I had rather give a dollar for a letter by the post, tho the consequence should be that I Eat but one meal a day for these 3 weeks to come. Every one I see is inquiring after you and when did I hear. All my intelligance is collected from the news paper and I can only reply that I saw by that, that you arrived such a day. I know your...
I have just returnd from a visit to my Brother, with my Father who carried me there the day before yesterday, and call’d here in my return to see this much injured Town. I view it with much the same sensations that I should the body of a departed Friend, only put of f its present Glory, for to rise finally to a more happy State. I will not despair, but will believe that our cause being good we...
I have been trying ever since you went away to learn to write you a Letter. I shall make poor work of it, but Sir Mamma says you will accept my endeavours, and that my Duty to you may be expressd in poor writing as well as good. I hope I grow a better Boy and that you will have no occasion to be ashamed of me when you return. Mr. Thaxter says I learn my Books well—he is a very good Master. I...
I have (my Dear Brother) been more than entertained by perusing a number of your Letters to my Sister. Highly favoured among Women, and peculiarly happy is her Lot in sharing the Confidence, and possessing the Esteem; the tenderest Affection, of a Man, in whose Breast the patriotic Virtues glow with unmitigated Fervour. In one of your Letters you express a desire that all your Friends would...
I dare not express to you at 300 hundred miles distance how ardently I long for your return. I have some very miserly Wishes; and cannot consent to your spending one hour in Town till at least I have had you 12. The Idea plays about my Heart, unnerves my hand whilst I write, awakens all the tender sentiments that years have encreased and matured, and which when with me were every day...
I have but little news to write you. Every thing of that kind you will learn by a more accurate hand than mine; things remain much in the same situation here that they were when you went away, there has been no Desent upon the sea coast. Guards are regularily kept, and people seem more settled, and are returning to their husbandry.—I feel somewhat lonesome. Mr. Thaxter is gone home, Mr. Rice...
I received by the Deacon two Letters from you this Day from Hartford. I feel a recruit of spirits upon the reception of them, and the comfortable news which they contain. We had not heard any thing from N. Carolina before, and could not help feeling anxious least we should find a defection there, arising more from their ancient feuds and animosities, than from any setled ill will in the...
Suppose you have had a formidable account of the alarm we had last Sunday morning. When I rose about six oclock I was told that the Drums had been some time beating and that 3 allarm Guns were fired, that Weymouth Bell had been ringing, and Mr. Welds was then ringing. I immediatly sent of an express to know the occasion, and found the whole Town in confusion. 3 Sloops and one cutter had come...
I set down to write to you a monday, but really could not compose myself sufficently: the anxiety I sufferd from not hearing one syllable from you for more than five weeks; and the new distress ariseing from the arrival of recruits agitated me more than I have been since the never to be forgotten 14 of April. I have been much revived by receiving two letters from you last Night, one by the...
The Day; perhaps the decisive Day is come on which the fate of America depends. My bursting Heart must find vent at my pen. I have just heard that our dear Friend Dr. Warren is no more but fell gloriously fighting for his Country—saying better to die honourably in the field than ignominiously hang upon the Gallows. Great is our Loss. He has distinguished himself in every engagement, by his...
I received yours of june 10, for which I thank you. I want you to be more perticuliar. Does every Member feel for us? Can they realize what we suffer? And can they believe with what patience and fortitude we endure the conflict—nor do we even tremble at the frowns of power.—You inquire of me, who were at the engagement at Grape Island. I may say with truth all Weymouth Braintree Hingham who...
Long before this will reach you, you will have an Account of the Action, att Charlestown, in which though the regulars have gaind an Advantageous Cituation have paid for itt very dearly, which loss in Millitary Accheivements is lookt upon as trivial. The distruction of Charlestown is a most Melancholy seen, as Three quarters of the Inhabitants have lost there, all. Brother Kent house, W....
My Father has been more affected with the distruction of Charlstown, than with any thing which has heretofore taken place. Why should not his countanance be sad when the city, the place of his Fathers Sepulchers lieth waste, and the gates thereof are consumed with fire, scarcly one stone remaineth upon an other. But in the midst of sorrow we have abundant cause of thankfulness that so few of...
One of the many brave and gallant Actions that have graced our Arms, I take the Liberty of writing you an Account of. The most important Transactions, since your Abscence, you are undoubtedly already informed of; but as this, I am about to relate, is just come to hand, I embrace the Opportunity of sending you an Account of it by the Express. Not long before the Date of this, General Gage...
You have no Doubt long before this heard of the unhappy Fate of Charlestown, its Destruction by Fire, the forcing of our Entrenchments there by the ministerial Troops and the Loss of our valuable Friend Doct. Warren who was shot through the Breast and soon expir’d. The Entrenchments were unfinishd the work of but one Night. However, they were gallantly defended and by all Accounts, there was...