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    • McKean, Thomas
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    • Adams, John
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    • Madison Presidency

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I can now answer the questions in your favor of the 30th. July last, viz. Who shall write the history of the American Revolution &c.? Major General James Wilkinson has written it. He commences with the battle of Bunker’s or Breed’s hill at Boston and concludes with the battle near New-Orleans on the Missisippi, a period of forty years. It will be published in three volumes large octavo, each...
We have been spectators of such wonderful scenes within the last fifty years of our lives as perhaps were never seen before in the same space of time: tempests, convulsions, wars & revolutions have succeeded each other with such rapidity & violence as to cause the utmost astonishment of the human mind; but the events in Europe within the last and present year surpass all the rest. Napoleon,...
The communications of our Plenepotentiaries at Ghent give complete evidence of the temper & views of the British government respecting peace with the United States; they will emphatically unite them. I have always been of opinion that the Administration of Britain intended to protract the negotiation until the result of the present campaign should be known; but until now I did not believe they...
In your favor of the 26th. Novembert last you say, “that you ventured to say, that about a third of the people of the Colonies were against the Revolution.” It required much reflection before I could fix my opinion on this subject, but on mature deliberation I conclude you are right, and that more than a third of influencial characters were against it. The opposition consisted chiefly of the...
In your favor of 26th November last, you say “that you venture to say that about a third of the people of the Colonies were against the Revolution.” It required much reflection before I could fix my opinion on this subject; but, on mature deliberation, I conclude you are right, and that more than a third of influential characters were against it. The opposition consisted chiefly of the...
I have to thank you for the introduction of the Reverend Mr; Henry Colman to my acquaintance, and am sorry his other engagements deprived me of his company as often and in the manner I wished. My last letter was (I perceived) dated in August instead of September; your’s of that date, to which mine was an answer, bore the same date, and I suppose lay before me. Old age will discover itself,...
With sincerity I condole with you on the death of your daughter; I had five children who have died, three of whom have been married & left a numerous offspring. By these events we have sustained the deprivation of great comforts; but our loss is their ineffable gain, they are in the bosom of their father and their God. These are among the common calamities of life: resignation to the...
I can at length furnish you with a copy of the proceedings of the Congress held at New-York in 1765; it is inclosed herewith. After diligent enquiry, I had not been able to procure a single copy either in manuscript or print, done in the United States, but fortunately met one, published by J. Almon in London, in 1767, with a collection of American tracts in four octavo volums, from which I...
On my return from a tour to the State of Delaware I found your kind letter of the 2d. instant, and thank you for this mark of esteem. Our venerable friend Clinton is gone before us, so has the illustrious Washington eleven years ago; and I have nearly outlived all my early acquaintance. I remain the only surviving member of the first American Congress, held in the city of New-York in October...