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I Received your favor of the 23d. ult. but not til Satterday night as the man who promisd. to give it me forgot it. I am, Sir exceedingly oblidg’d to you for your thoughts and tender consern for my Son; the Carector you give him must be very agreeable to me and his Mother and all related. I hope and beleave it tis so except the prudent part, in that I think he is short, but perhaps a few Years...
Saturday a Man of war arrived with the new accounts. The Governor has summoned the new Council to meet at Salem to day. Reports are various as to the Gentlemen who are appointed and the number. I have heard that only 12 are appointed from England and that the remaining 24 are to be nominated by the Governor. Others say that 36 the whole number are appointed from home. All that I have heard...
I know not where this will find you whether upon the road, or at Phylidelphia, but where-ever it is I hope it will find you in good Health and Spirits. Your Journey I immagine must have been very tedious from the extreem heat of the weather and the dustiness of the road’s. We are burnt up with the drouth, having had no rain since you left us, nor is there the least apperance of any. I was much...
The great distance between us, makes the time appear very long to me. It seems already a month since you left me. The great anxiety I feel for my Country, for you and for our family renders the day tedious, and the night unpleasent. The Rocks and quick Sands appear upon every Side. What course you can or will take is all wrapt in the Bosom of futurity. Uncertainty and expectation leave the...
In the county of Worcester, the people, at a general meeting, have resolved that no court shall be held there, according to the new regulation of juries, and that judge Oliver shall not take his seat. Upon a report that a regiment would be sent to protect the court, they declared that they were ready to meet it. It is to be hoped, however, that no violent measures will be taken, till the sense...
The great Obligations your Friendship has laid me under would render me inexcusable to neglect any Occasion of paying You my Acknowlegements; it is with real Pleasure, therefore, I find so early an Opportunity presenting to fulfill my Promise of writing You: Which should it contribute in the least to your Gratification will convince me the Time was not unusefully spent. The late Manoeuvres of...
I wrote you 21st. Inst. which I hope you have receiv’d. The publick Prints of to Day, Which you will doubtless see, have been so satisfactory in their Accounts of the Proceedings of People in different Parts of the Province, as to render it unnecessary for me to write them. Every thing here is driving fast to an important Crisis. The Governor, if Report says true, is determined at all Hazards...
I am very impatient to receive a letter from you. You indulged me so much in that Way in your last absence, that I now think I have a right to hear as often from you as you have leisure and opportunity to write. I hear that Mr. Adams wrote to his Son and the Speaker to his Lady, but perhaps you did not know of the opportunity. Suppose you have before this time received two letters from me, and...
This Week has been fruitfull of extraordinary Transactions. I will endeavour to give You some Account of them. Tuesday the Superior Court opened and Mr. Oliver took his Seat as chief Justice. When the grand Jury were called upon to be sworn they all to a Man refus’d taking the Oath, for Reasons committed to Paper, which they permitted the Court, after some Altercation, to read. The Petit Jury...
I wrote you a fortnight ago by Mr. Sullivan, since which almost every day has produced some new matter of joy to the friends of Liberty. The proceedings of the people at Salem Cambridge and other places —the resignation of many of the new Councillors—the behaviour of both juries at the Superior Court held here the last week; are some of the most important. I had proposed to send you a very...
A Very long and uninterrupted course of sickness has hitherto prevented me the pleasure of answering your Letters dated Boston June 28 and Dec. 11:1773, The Letter dated June 28 was long before it reached me and being pillaged of those papers relative to the proceedings of the Council which are mentioned in it I fear it fell into bad Hands. In that Letter Dear Sir you desire me to inform you...
Five Weeks have past and not one line have I received. I had rather give a dollar for a letter by the post, tho the consequence should be that I Eat but one meal a day for these 3 weeks to come. Every one I see is inquiring after you and when did I hear. All my intelligance is collected from the news paper and I can only reply that I saw by that, that you arrived such a day. I know your...
The spirit of liberty is amazingly increased, so that there is scarce a tory and hardly a neutral to be found in the country. This province seems ripe for a more popular government, if not restrained by congress, who will doubtless give all the encouragement to all that the good of the whole will admit of. Some talk of resuming our first charter, others of absolute independency. Our eye is to...
Nothing very material has taken Place here since Mr. Revere left Boston, by whom you will have particular Accounts. The Fortifications at the Entrance of the Town and Entrenchments &c. on the Neck advance rapidly, they have three hundred Soldiers constantly at Work there. Seven Regiments are already here with a Train of thirty Peices of Cannon, and two more Regiments from Quebec are every Week...
I have just returnd from a visit to my Brother, with my Father who carried me there the day before yesterday, and call’d here in my return to see this much injured Town. I view it with much the same sensations that I should the body of a departed Friend, only put of f its present Glory, for to rise finally to a more happy State. I will not despair, but will believe that our cause being good we...
On my Return from Salem this Afternoon I was gratified with the Receipt of your kind Letter dated at Prince-Town 28th. of last Month. I could have wish’d it a much longer one, though considering the public Character which You travel in that must occasion You many Invitations; and the important Business which you have engag’d to transact and which must very deeply employ your Time and Thoughts,...
Our enemies, for their own further security, as well as to bring the town into the most complete dependence on the army and navy, spare no labor or pains; they suffer no owner of powder to take a single grain out of the town’s magazine, and there is none to be bought in the town. Two or three days ago, after the men of war had spiked up our cannon at the battery, they robbed us of six good...
Your favor of the first of August I received Yesterday by a private Hand. I most sincerly simpathize with you and the rest of my Brethren in America for the cruel hardships you labour under, but severe as your Trials are I am thoroughly convinced, that Unanimity and firmness among Yourselves will ensure you success in the end. Little did I think when I wrote you last, that such Violent and I...
Mr. Revere arriv’d late on friday Evening and brought Us your Letters. Each one communicated the animating Intelligence convey’d in them to his particular Circle, and by 11 o’Clock the next Morng. the Contents of your Letters had circulated through the Town. The Assurance you give us of the Unanimity that prevails in the Congress has banish’d the only Fear we had remaining—a Disunion of...
I have been trying ever since you went away to learn to write you a Letter. I shall make poor work of it, but Sir Mamma says you will accept my endeavours, and that my Duty to you may be expressd in poor writing as well as good. I hope I grow a better Boy and that you will have no occasion to be ashamed of me when you return. Mr. Thaxter says I learn my Books well—he is a very good Master. I...
I have (my Dear Brother) been more than entertained by perusing a number of your Letters to my Sister. Highly favoured among Women, and peculiarly happy is her Lot in sharing the Confidence, and possessing the Esteem; the tenderest Affection, of a Man, in whose Breast the patriotic Virtues glow with unmitigated Fervour. In one of your Letters you express a desire that all your Friends would...
I hear that a letter from one P——s, a clergyman in Connecticut, has been intercepted, and that an attested copy of it is now before our congress. The contents of it are very extraordinary—he informs the person to whom it is addressed, that he has received advice that several regiments more from England, and a number of men of war, are expected, and that when they arrive, hanging work will...
I dare not express to you at 300 hundred miles distance how ardently I long for your return. I have some very miserly Wishes; and cannot consent to your spending one hour in Town till at least I have had you 12. The Idea plays about my Heart, unnerves my hand whilst I write, awakens all the tender sentiments that years have encreased and matured, and which when with me were every day...
Having just been informed that Mr. Tudor is going to Philadelphia, I take this opportunity to thank you for the obliging favor of your letter of 29th September. The struggle, as you justly observe, between fleets and armies and commercial regulations, must be very unequal: We hope, however, the congress will carry this mode of defence as far as it will go, and endeavor to render it as early...
I Recd yours of the 18th Sepr with A pleasure and satisfaction that render my Negligence in not Answering it before almost Inexcusable. I shant trouble you at this Time with any Apologies, but leave your Candour to Excuse me till I have an Opportunity to do it on A Social Evening att Braintree or Plymouth and Improve the Short Time I now have in Another way. Great has been my Anxiety since you...
Yours of the 30th. Ult. I Recd, by Mr. Revere. He shew me Also your Cautionary paper, which was needless with respect to Any thing containd in your favour. But I have forbore to read it to Any Enemies or Suspected friends. In Obedience to your injunctions and my own inclinations, I carry’d your friendly mention of Mr. Wheelwright to him who was glad to hear of you &c. When I read your Amusing...
Virginia, 16 December 1774. LbC ( MHi :Donations to Sufferers by the Boston Port Bill, p. 66); addressed: “To Sam & Jno. Adams Esqrs at Boston”; signed: “John Tabb, of Amelia Ro Bolling, Jno. Bannister Dinwiddie.” This letter was addressed to the two Adamses because the writers knew of no particular committee to which the donation could be sent. The donation was described as “a small...
It always gives me pleasure to hear of the Existence and Health of my Friend and his Family and more especially to have it from his own hand. The partiality discovered in yours of the 13th Instant is a strong Evidence of Friendship. I am sorry it should give you any Uneasiness, if the Elections you refer to are not Just such as you and I should Approve. I am Inclined to think they would not...
I Wrote to you the 24th of Septr last in answer to your Obliging favor of the first of August, at the same Time I sent you the Second Volume of Mr. Burgh’s Political Disquisitions, which I presume will afford you every great satisfaction, as that volume treats pretty largely on the Taxation of America and the Importance of the Colonies to Great Britain, but in Case that Volume or Letter should...
I Admire the Notes and Resolves of the Maryland Convention. They Breath a Spirit of Liberty and Union which does Honour to them and Indeed the whole Continent. I am greatly puzzled to determine what Consequences the United force of all these things will produce in Britain. They must be Infatuated to A degree I can hardly Conceive of, if these things make no Impression and yet in general I...
(a Memento for Tyrants as A man has it) Seting before a warm fire totus Solus with a Tankard of honest Cyder on my Rifles hand and as honest a dish of Clambs (taken out of Our pious Fore fathers powdering tub) on my left. “I lookd and blesst my Self, nor would I Change my State, For all the pompous Riches of the Great” or those who would be tho’t great, as is better Renderd. in the Original....
The very polite introduction to yours of Jan 3d I Consider not only as A Complement far beyond any Merit I can presume to Claim, but as Resulting in some Measure from that partial Byas which Ever Leads us to View through the most Favourable Medium whatever Regards those we Consider in the Light of Friendship. But when assure’d that I think myself both Honour’d and oblige’d whenever Mr. Adams...
I need not tell you that I was greatly disappointed and Chagrin’d at not seeing you at Cambridge A Member of our Congress. If it was the Choice of your Town, I Know not how they can Excuse, or even Extenuate the fault, surely A small degree of Patriotism would have dictated a very different Conduct. My disappointment was Encreased by not haveing the pleasure of seeing you on my way there, or...
I have Read a specimen of Nov Anglus as of this day and am not a little in Raptures with it, should have Rejoyced if Edes & Gill had began and finished this days paper with his masterly performance, which I hope in God may be continued for the Edification of the Good people for whose Good it was designed and as this is Something of a leasure time may we go on. God will prosper his endeavours....
With some difficulty I have Obtained the Inclosed. Some scruples which you have not resolved, and some fears, and Apprehensions from Rumors Abroad have Occasioned the delay, and reluctance. The Copy I got last Night. Have had no time to read it over. You will please to Examine and Correct &c. and do with it as you think proper, haveing as I dare say you will, a proper regard to prudence under...
A sacred regard to the american association on the one hand and an earnest desire not to injure my fellow subjects in Great Britain on the other is the reason of my writing you at this time to request your advice for my future conduct and also to confirm or set me right in my judgment in a Late affair that has happened in this Port. The case is as follows a Vessell arived here from Bristol the...
I was in hopes you would have just called as you went out of Town, more especially as I Asked the favor I wanted to have troubled you with the inclosed —but you forgot me. I Sent and got the Group it is Admirally well done as far as it go’s, but, pauca desunt , vizt. Act. II. Scene I. The persons are, Hateall, Hazlerod, Monsieur, Beau-Trumps, Simple, Humbug, Sr. Sparrow, yet the first part...
The interesting Advices we rec’d here on Sunday, and which the Papers will acquaint You, have had almost as great an Effect on People in this Town, as the Arrival of the Port Bill produc’d. The Women are terrify’d by the Fears of Blood and Carnage. The Merchants are dispirited, by the Expectation of Lord North’s Bill for the Prevention of the Newfoundland Fishery; and the Trading to any Parts...
At the same time that I make my Gratful Acknowledgment, for the instructive sentiments and Friendly hint, Contained in yours of the 15th March I must ask your indulgence so far as to Favour me with your opinion (by my son who will Call on you on Monday Next) of the present dark and Gloomy aspect of public affairs. Is there no hope that the Dread Calamity of Civil Convulsions may yet be...