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Aÿant reçú plusieurs temoignages d’amitie et d’estime de votre Excellence, pendant votre Sejour a Leÿde, je me flatte a present, qu’il ne Sera point desagreable a vous, de recevoir de ma part une preuve de ma confiance en elle. C’est un sollicitation, Monseigneur! et j’espere, qu’elle ne vous paroitra pas trop temeraire, a cause qu’elle est par un ami; un homme de talens, qui à un jugement...
Having received several expressions of your Excellency’s friendship and esteem during your stay in Leyden, I flatter myself now that it will not be disagreeable for you to receive proof of my confidence in our friendship. It is a solicitation sir! I hope that it will not appear to you to be rash, because it is made by a friend; a man of talent, with profound and erudite judgment, and with the...
If anÿ man rejoice in the prosperity of the united States i wil hope that me shal not be denied a place amongst them, and I think it mÿ dutÿ to congratulate your Excellencÿ with the complete victorÿ of your arms in the chesapeak-baÿ and the Burgoynishing of that mighty Lord with his many thousand Slaves. Now wil the proud of the British nation be humiliated—now shal a venal and corrupt...
Althoug I am not So happÿ to be the first in making mÿ Compliments to your Excellencÿ; I am however persuaded that not one of mÿ countrÿmen is more addicted to the cause of America and more attached to your Excellencÿ than I am. I congratulate mÿself with the favour of your Excellency’s acquaintance—with a part of the friendship of your Excellencÿ, and I flatter mÿself, that the aknowledgment...
L’accueil, dont vous m’avez honorés pendant votre Sejour dans cette Republique et les marqúes d’estime et d’amitie, avec lesquelles vous m’aves daigné de favoriser, m’ont animé, d’interrompre vos occupations Serieuses, et d’implorer en vous les secours d’un ami, qui je hesiterai de vous communique en qualite d’Ambassadeur, n’etant point accoutumé, de faire la cour aux gens en place, et ne...
L’année passé j’avois L’honneur de communiquer a votre Excellence mon desir de passer en Amerique avec ma Famille pour m’etablir dans L’etat de New-york: vous aviez la bonté de me donner des informations Sur ce projet, joignant a cela La flatteuse promesse, de vouloir bien, dans un tel cas m’honorer de vos recommandations. Dans ce tems mon Epouse ne pouvoit prendre la resolution de chercher un...
Being returned at New-york, after a journeÿ of five weeks in the countrÿ, to take a view of the land, I wished to employ this moment to inform your Hon. of the issue—I was about 70 miles above albany—Saw differents tracts of Land—Probably, if the price be not to high—our choice wil be the circuits of kingston, where we have Seen two farm, who suided to our circumstances. In two or three weeks...
Making a purchase of a Small farm in this State, two miles from Esopus to which I intend to go up with mÿ family in two weeks i thougt it my duty to inform your Honour of this business. Since my last letters I paid a visit a Præsident Franklin, and Lodged two days bÿ General Washington. the Politeness, with which I was received there gives me great pleasure by their remembrances; and these wil...
Long before I read your Excell Defence of the Constitution &c I saw their criticism by the Reviewers, which enlarged my desire of perusing itself, flattering mÿ with the idea that I should acquire a fair opportunity of sending some strictures upon it to Mr. Adams, because the first announcing a fear of a to ardent Love for Democracÿ, and the following declaration, that those fears were...
The Bearer of these Letters Mr. S. T. G. Mappa, late Commander of the armed citisens in the Province of Holland, was one of the most distinguished caracters of the Dutch Patriots. His abilities in different re Spects—his manners—his braverÿ & knowledge—his Sacrifices wil entitle him to your Excellencÿ’s protection. there the manÿ obligations with which your Excellency was pleased to honour me...
I hope not, that your Excellencÿ will find me troublesome, that I soo often intrude myself upon you. It is some mere Leisure, this winter, occasioned by mÿ intendeth departure to the Western Parts, which I can spent with my Librarÿ and which affords me if not an opportunity, at least an excuse, for adressing a few Lines to your Excellency. However it would be pardonable, if I did judge, bÿ the...
After your Excellency’s advice, for which I am much obliged, I wrote, by this Sloop, to his Excellency the President, State the affair, and requested his interference so far, as He maÿ think proper, and I flatter my Self, that it wil be promoted bÿ you in the Same manner. But this occasion Sir! is to favourable, not to make use of it, in enlarging—for a moment upon a particular article of your...
Mÿ approaching departure to the borders of Oneida Lake will excuse these few lines to ÿour Excellencÿ. Long times I flattered mÿ Self though in vain, that my European losses would have been repair’d in part—but this prospect being vanished, duty compelled me, to provide, in time for a raising familÿ—and without the generous assistance of Some of me frends, I would have been unable, to proceed,...
Your Excellencÿ’s favour of March 27. I received the 17 apr.—and was it not for a particularity attending this Letter, I would not so soon have troubled you with these. You Superscrbed the Cover with your name, joining to it, Free —this word together with your name was erased, and in their place put none free —Is this a consequence of the new regulations of the Post-office? With regard to...
You, who are acquainted with mÿ character, cannot favour the opinion, that I should have forgotten, the different and conspicuous marks of favour friendship and confidence, bestowed upon me since manÿ years, or be indifferent about it, how inconsiderable the sentiments of a forgotten farmer should seem to anÿ other man in your elevated station. I know, your Excellency is it not, and it is upon...
Though I can not find a pretext, valid enough to exculpate me, in interrupting your Excellency’s serious occupations, however I am inclined to believe, that ÿou will excuse it after a silence of seven months, in the persuasion, that a due sense, of what everÿ American owes to your merits and character, with which since more than a dozen years I have been acquainted, being a witness of a great...
The knowledge of your Excellency’s principles, with the distinguished marks of attention, which with Your Excellency was So Kind of honouring me, Since manÿ years, makes me so free of introducing to you Major Peter van Gaesbeck. His character as a man entitled him to the general esteem of his fellow-Citisens, and the quality of his mind promoted so much of his Intrests by the free-holders of...
I hope not, that I shall be importune in writing again; it is my anxious concern for America’s prosperity which prompts me to it—though I flatter myself, that the wisdom and Integritÿ of the majority of Both houses maÿ preserve us be the blessings of Peace, however I cannot set aside a Suspicion, that too manÿ are entangled bÿ the intrigues of European Emissaries, whose boasted love for the...
Informed by the Resolution of the House of Representatives that our Government intends to arm Six frigates, I find me Self obliged, to make your Excellency acquainted with a worthÿ American, to whom, if known, perhaps maÿ be adjudged the command of one of them. at least—He will come in consideration if an excellent character, a prudent and manlÿ behaviour, experience in the art of navigation...
Confiding that mÿ moving to the western Parts, and arrival there Shall be by your Excellency a Sufficient plea for the excuse of this Letter, being unable to give a more valid, I am So free to renew for a few moments the remembrance of him whom you honour’d to this time with your esteem. The Situation here is delightful—the Soil rich enough—and my Seat in particular would admit everÿ...
I Should not have importuned your Excell—this year with another Letter did I not believe it dutiful to acquaint you with everÿ material change in mÿ circumstances—not that I Consider them impertant enough to merit much your Excell. attention, but that it Seems to bestow some impertance on me, in persuding me Self that you believe me not unworthy of communicating them with you. the Council of...
After the renewed marks of distinction, which your Excellency’s favour bestowed on me, I maÿ be so bold, without fear of incurring any blame, to appeal to you under this familiar epitheton—there you, calling yourself my real friend, contributes so much to that serenety of mind and comfort, which I enjoy in my retirement, notwithstanding so many toils and disappointments which would have...
Though I was not fortunate enough to See Dr Belknap and Morse, as you Excellencÿ kindly intended, there they went not so far to the western as the place of mÿ abode. the first of these Gentleman favour’d me with an Letter, and included yours of Jan. 3th. How retired my way of living maÿ be, to which I am obliged as wel as inclined, I Should have rejoiced—at becoming acquainted with Such...
Washington’s resignation, which crowns that excellent man with glory, opens the career for my worthy and much respected friend, to bestow new obligations upon his Country-men, if they are wise enough to take hold of this favourable opportunity. Can your Excell—without compromitting yourself procure your old friend a place among the Electors in this State—you know upon to whom he Shall paÿ the...
I hasten to send your Excellencÿ another letter from mÿ solitarÿ mansion. before the united American Electors have called you to occupy the chair of their President. It would have been a pleasant satisfaction if I could have contributed to it my part. it seems this must not so be, but you know my heart. Once—in my life—I begged of a man in place the favor, to be classed among the electors that...
Permit me to address You with few words upon your election to the Presidencÿ of the United States: Mÿ wishes in this part are entirely accomplished—May America remain happÿ in peace, and prosper under your administration—So that the names of Washington and Adams may be combined at every new election—as those of August and Trajan; maÿ its Thankfulness compensate in part the Sacrifices, which...
It is Long ago, that I was honoured with your favour of Dec. 6 and April 18—in which your Excellency communicated with me the unhappy situation of the worthy Luzac, worthy indeed the high encomiums, which you have bestowed on him, and more so to have merited in such high a degree your Excellency esteem and adprobation. I should have sooner accused this favour, had I not feared to interrupt...
Was it not to Satisfÿ the ardent wishes of a learned deceased friend, I should consider it approaching to Sacrilege to intrude upon you, and bereave you of the use of a Single one of those precious moments, which you, in this critical period, with unrelenting ardor consecrate to the Securing and promoting the happiness of millions who entrusted themselves to your care and guardianship. Perhaps...
Since I was the last time honoured with your favour, I did not presume to interrupt Your Excellency’s occupations for a moment, more So, there I had nothing to communicate your attention. The boasted proposals of an intended refutation of your Defence—which then first will be valued according its intrinsic merit—after the high Station—which you now honour—Shall be no longer an allurement to...
Since long I received not a more Sensible pleasure, as when I Saw me favoured with your approbation on my lucubrations I desire no more, and prepare it immediately for the press—The difficulty Shall be to find a Printer. I perused many years ago Ubbo Emmius—and read it again with attention before I brought my matereals in order. if I have Succeeding in Spreading Some new light on Some parts of...
Long time since I should have acknowledged your favour of 12 March had I not hesitated, to interrupt your Excellency’s dignified retirement. To continue, however, in Silence could Seem, that I undervalued the honor, of your Excellency’s condescending, in communicating with me his ideas about a Subject, intended, to promote the Public good. Encouraged by your Excell: flattering opinion, I...
I Shall make no apologÿ for mÿ Sudden rescript to your favor of Aug. 15th. The high glee, in which I am, and my usual contentment requires only little fuel to rise to an uncommon pitch of joÿ, compells me to working—tho a beautiful fair daÿ—and work enough in the garden to perform—but Adams! The garden shall remain, when either of us—when both shall be no more. Why then should I bereave meself...
With reluctance I Should interrupt your Excellency’s occupations, in the persuasion, that my correspondence can not atone for your devoting to it one Single moment of your pretious time, did duty not oblige me, to consider you now as a Father, whose inestimable loss maÿ be only by them be appreciated, whose heart and hopes can be compared with yours. What can I Saÿ, afflicted Father! to...
The Sensible pleasure, received from your Excell:s favour of the 25th Dec. with which I was honoured quite unexpected, induces me to a rescription. I hope, this will not be consider’d as abusing your Excell. condescendence, in devoting few moments of your precious time to an old client, who may boast of your Excell. esteem, continued in different Situations of life Since twenty years. Maÿ I...
Once more I Shall enjoÿ the Sensation in addressing you as the President of the U.S. but your leaving the chair will not bereave you of a more exalted title, that of being the Father and Benefactor of your Countrÿ. To your indefatigable cares America owes her continuallÿ increasing prosperity—to you we owe—that our peace had been undisturbed—our independencÿ consolidated—and our Friendship...
Long Since I Should have acquitted me of my duty in congratulating you with your Safe arrival at your beloved Quincÿ, but the apprehension of interrupting your contentment—the onlÿ reward for all—your Services and Sacrifices—during a long meritorious life, if you could disregard the applauses of enlightened Europe—persuaded me to postpone it a while. Tho in the medden of your friends—in the...
Having unexpectedly received an opportunity of conveying you my cursory remarks on some parts of Buffon’s and Jefferson’s Theory on Nat. Hist. by my Frend Col. John Lincklaen, I could not resist the temptation in Submitting them to your criticism, persuaded that you Shall bestow on me a new favour, if you condescend to their perusal and think them So much worth your attention, to communicate...
Though my apprehension of abusing your kindness made me delaÿ my answer on your Letter, with which you was pleased to favour me in July Last, I cannot longer resist the temptation in addressing you once more with a few lines, flattering meself that my Sincere homage to your exalted virtues will atone in part for mÿ intrusion. I am persuaded at present, that the boasted answer to your...
The favour of your Letter of 20 Aug—with which I was so unexpected honoured—procured me a delightful pleasure in renewing your kind assurances of esteem, and opening a new field for my instruction—I am only grieved, that it is beyond my power—to make some equivalent return, and discharge a part of the obligations you have laid me under. I should sooner have acquitted meself of the duty of a...
Had I not been favoured with so manÿ proofs of your kindness I should have hesitated to undertake the task in writing this letter; more so, as I flatter’d meself, that it should have been in mÿ friend’s power, to satisfy in this article the utmost of your wishes. But here I fear I shall be disappointed, as this is the time of the ÿear of making up his annual accounts, which require all his...
You know too well mÿ attachment to your person, and am persuaded how highly I value your honoured correspondence, not to Suspect that Some weighty reason must have prevented my not answering your favour of Jan. 26—I dare not wait longer now I am honoured with another of March 8—With my remarks on Buffon. I am always apprehensive, to bereave me of the Sensible States faction, which you bestow...
Mÿ occupations in gathering seeds—and preparing my fields and garden for ensuing spring have thus far prevented my answering the favour, with which I was honored bÿ you last month—Tho’ mÿ hope of receiving, before this time, a decision about the Achaic Republick, had influenced this delaÿ. I sent it to Philadelphia, where my correspondent J. Mifflin will charge himself with super intending the...
A letter of mÿ frind Mr. Mifflin induces me to address you again few lines. Mr. Dobson returned him the Mss of the Achaic Republick, after many protestations of regard for the author the purchasers would not be sufficiently numerous to purchase an edition of this work It would answer extremely well in Europe—but he was under the necessity of declining the printing. Mr S. Bradford regretted...
I must answer your favours of Dec. 14 ult. and Jan the 3th. Want of time will once have the happy effect, to emportune you not with a Long Letter. How can you insinuate, that your correspondence is of no value? Is not every line of you then an act of kindness towards me? Not to saÿ, that I never received one, without some kind of instruction. But why Should I use any motif—to entreat you to...
In returning you my remarks—I hope to enjoy ere long the satisfaction, that, after a Second perusal, you may find them worthÿ a place among the Mem. of your Academÿ: if So, my debt towards you will be increased, as you may claim their additional value. However this may be, I am preparing a Memoir on the use of copper by the Greeks, addressed to John Luzac—to pay a part of the Intrest—if I can...
I send you mÿ Lett. on the use of copper among the Greeks—I can not flatter me, that it Shall procure you either much information, or amusement, but I maÿ have opened a new road for investigation, and then mÿ endeavours will have Some merit—at least in your eÿe. If it happened, that it deserved your approbation, that you deemed it worth a Public view, I Should intend it for the Pennsylvanian...
Since I Send you, at your for me So highlÿ gratifying—demand mÿ Lucubrations on Jefferson’s and Buffon’s theories —I have the honor to Submit to your criticism a Short essay on the use of copper and brass during the trojan War , addressed to our mutual frend John Luzac. I had the pleasure to send you, as you desired, his historÿ of the French Revolut . Could I imagine—that you would construe...
How Shall it be in my power, to paÿ you mÿ Sincere thanks for the favours with which you continue to honour me—even above mÿ warmest expectation. I was not vain enough to attend at So much condescendence from your part, to offer mÿ Inset —with your own hand—to your illustrious Academÿ—by which I received the most unequivocal pledge of your high approbation—a more than equivalent reward for my...
As I was not confident of your kind indulgence, which I did so often experience, I should hesitate, to importune you again with a letter, as I cannot expect to enhance much the pleasures of your dignified retirement by my correspondence. As you hinted in your favour of Aug—last, that the fate of my remarks on Jefferson’s and Buffon’s whimsical theories would presumptively be decided at the...
I should have before this used mÿ priviledge of writing to you, had I not been informed by the Rev. Smith, who did me the pleasure to dine with us, that you Sir, with your respected family enjoy’d a perfect health—He had been a classmate of your son Boylston, and was profuse in his encomiums on the Rev. Ernat —He delighted to instil in Mr Mappa and me the high opinion you fostered of that...