You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Barclay, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Adams, John

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Barclay, Thomas" AND Recipient="Adams, John"
Results 1-30 of 56 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I shou’d have waited on you myself, but seeing some Carriages at your door I Concluded you were engaged. I have seen Mr. Van Arp, who says there is no other way of your giving a Guarrentee, that will have any force in it, but doing it before a Notary and Evidences. I am of opinion that to remove all shaddow of objection you had better do it in their own way; and if you think with me, the...
I most heartily and sincerely Congratulate your Excellency on the Events of Friday and saturday last, and I rejoice the more because you are destined to reap the fruits of what you have sown with so much industry and attention. I am persuaded you are now rewarded for the Exercise of patience which you have Exhibited on this occasion, and I hope an agreeable prospect is now opened for the...
Captain Smedley will, I expect, Sail in about Six days, and if your Excellency has any Dispatches, or other Commands, he will be a good opportunity to Send them by. I Shall endeavour to wait upon you at the Hague previous to his Departure. Mr. Livingston wrote to me Some time ago to Send him Such Pamphlets or Papers as Contain any thing of Consequence or Information, but I can lay my hands...
I had a letter some days ago from Doctor Franklin desiring me not to draw on him for any more money, to which yesterday I wrote a reply, a Copy of which I send inclosed to your Excellency. If you shou’d ask why I trouble you with it, my answer is, that it is for the reason I have given Doctor Franklin for writing so long a letter to him, “because I wish you to know minutely my situation.” I...
Since my arrival here I received the packet which I inclose to you from M Livingston with particular instructions relative to it. I send it by the bearer Mr. Frazer of Boston under Cover to Mess: Ingraham & Bromfield who will take proper Care of it. Doctor Franklin has been a good deal indisposed with the Gout and gravel, he is somewhat better, and went abroad in a Carriage on sunday; I have...
I wrote you from Paris inclosing you a packet of great Consequence which I received from Mr Livingston, but for want of a Conveyance to please me, I put it into the hands of Mr. Jay who will take proper Care of it. I wish you had it, and if Mr. Jay had, when I was at Paris, any thing of much Consequence that he wou’d put on paper, I wou’d have sent the whole by Express. I am anxious about it,...
I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 25 th. November, and was so well pleased to find you had not intirely forgot Me, that I did Not recollect you had passed so long a time in silence— The truth is that I know you have so Many Matters of Consequence to think and write about, that I shou’d be very sorry you wou’d ever Endeavour at any kind of punctuality with Me I am sure I need...
As we hear that you are soon Expected at Paris, I Beg leave to mention to you that the Bills which were paid by your orders in Holland are All in the hands of Fizeau & Grand of Amsterdam, and that when your Accounts are arranging it will be necessary to have them here, to Compare them with the sums Charged— you will therefore please to take up those Bills and bring them with you— I have had a...
Inclosed is a letter which I received by the last packet from New york, and which I sincerely hope will bring you agreeable Intelligence from your family— I shall move from hence in a few days, and will be glad to know in what manner you will have your Coach disposed of, I Beg leave to Trouble you with two Inclosed letters, one for Mess: Hope & C o. the other for Mess. John De Neufville & son,...
I had the pleasure of receiving your letter relative to the House at Auteuil, since which several Messages pass’d between the Count de Rouault and Me, and all have Ended in an appointment to Meet Tomorrow on the spot, where I shall make known my demands for Repairs, and more than probably I will Inform you by next post that the House is taken for you The Furniture must absolutely be alterd,...
I am favor’d, with your letter of the 4 th. and thank you for the Trouble you took with the letters for Amsterdam— I am about half Converted to your opinion on the subject of the Vouchers, and will try to get them by other means than your Interposition— I have made a Memorandum of the Repairs which will be Necessary at Auteuil, and will finish the affair Tomorrow. I left it unclosed untill I...
I Shall go to Amsterdam next Week, receive all the Bills of Mess rs Fizeaux & C o and Send them to you by Express, by whom I pray you to send me my Trunk and all my Effects. The Express will not Sett off, under ten days. You need not mention at present that I have Sent for my Effects. The Coach you may keep a little longer, if it is not inconvenient to you. if it is, as it is the Property of...
I am favor’d with your letter Covering one from Mess: Hope & C o. relative to the Draughts on M r. Jay which were twice paid. and I am much obliged to you for the Trouble you have had— The Trunk which you Mention was left by M r. Ridley, but No Key that I Can hear of, there is another Trunk of yours here, Exclusive of a very small one, and a quantity of Cloaths— I Do not beleive I Can Engage a...
Account of Bills of Exchange drawn by the Comm rs. of Loans in America on Henry Laurence & John Adams Esq rs. at Amsterdam.— 1780 Feb y. 25 In whose favor Charles Harady N o. 5 . . . . 1100 . . . . . . . .   1.100 July  6 th. Joseph Carlton from T Smith 137 Bills of 550 Guilders N o. 32 @ 41— 44 @ 61— 65 @ 75 77 @ 79— 82 & 83— 86 @ 103 105 @ 139— 144 @ 152— 167 @ 190 192 & 193 . . . . . say...
I received your letter by the Post and Express almost at the same time. Your things went away last Night at Eleven o’Clock, and Inclosed I send you an Account of them. It shou’d have gone by the Express but it was Very late before the affair was finish’d, and he will shew you a Duplicate of it— I Packed your Two Trunks Myself, and if they do not meet with any Interuption at the Barriers they...
I intended to have written to you some posts ago, But I found that a few of your things had been lock’d up in a Chamber at Auteuil, and left there with some matters belonging to M rs. Barclay, and that they had Escaped her Memory and My knowledge. There are Two Coat’s and 2 laced hats belonging to your servants—1 lamp to write by with 2 Ink stands, a Coat of Arms in a Frame, 2 wooden stands...
I wrote you last post since which I was Informed your things were stop’d at Brussells, This must have been Intirely through the Ignorence of the person who had them under his Care He had nothing to do but to Open the Trunks, shew there was nothing Contraband in them and so pass on— and this Idea I impressd as much on him by means of a person who spoke Dutch, as was in my power— But He to avoid...
I am fav d. with your letter of the 19 th. of last Month, and am Extremely glad to find your things have at length reach’d you— The few Articles that still remain shall Continue here untill you Come, as I do not think it will be right to put you to the Expence of Carriage— Doctor Bancroft arrived from Philadelphia a few days ago. M r. Jefferson is Certainly Joined in a Commission with you and...
I received your letter by M r. Bingham and heartily Congratulate you on the happy arrival in England. M r. Jefferson is here, but I have Not heard any thing of M r. Humphries, nor did I know of the arrival M r. Jefferson untill late last Night, and therefore have Not Yet seen him— I shall Endeavor to take Auteuil for you this day, by the Month, as possibly you may Not Chuse to pass the Winter...
Inclosed is a letter which I received Yesterday under Cover from M r. Dumas, I suppose the old Gentleman sent it to Me, as you are wholly Unknown in and about Paris— I hope the security of the Conveyance will make You amends for the Delay— I have purchased for M rs. Adams some Hyson, and other Teas, which will be left at Pichinies at Passy Near the Barrier au Conferance, who keeps a Pension,...
As I passed through Nantes in my way to Bordeaux I received a letter from M rs. Barclay wherin she mentions your Intention of going to England Next Month, and that you wish’d to see me before you set out. I have three public accounts of Consequence to settle at Bordeaux, and shall the Moment they are finish’d proceed home. you will oblige me by letting me Know by a line, addressed to the Care...
The Bearer Lieu t. Col: Franks waits upon You with some Dispatches from M r. Jefferson on the subject of which I need Not say much, but as M. Jefferson wishes Me to add any thing that occurs relative to the funds Necessary to accomplish the object, I shall just remark, that My Opinion is, the Presents ought Not to be Compleatly prepared untill we have a Certainty that the Treaty may be...
I wrote you Yesterday advising My Bill on you to M Grand N o. 6 for Two Hundred pounds Sterling— I shou’d have been before this time on the road to Madrid, but M r. De Beaumarchais having had his Accounts returned from America with a Reference to me, M. Jefferson thought I ought to give them an Examination so that No reflections hereafter shou’d lye on one of the Servants of the Public, for...
I arrived here the 10 th. and expect to be able to proceed to Cadiz in a few days, the Copys of three short Letters which I wrote to M r. Jefferson, will place before you our Progress untill this day, when I had the pleasure of receiving through the hands of M r. Carmichael The Kings Letter to the Emperor; informing him that it would be better the Peace should be made in Morocco than in Spain,...
The present is to advise You that of Yesterdays Date I Valued on You at Usance in Favor of M. Nicholas Darcel N o. 9—200 and of this Date N o. 10—200 Making together Four Hundred Pounds Sterling which please to Honor and place to Account of the United States. My last Bill to M Grand N o. 6, ought to have been mark’d N o. 8, an Error which I Committed by having my Books at S: Germains, it is of...
I wrote you the 2 d. Instant advising you of My Bills N o. 9. of the 1. in Favor of M. Darcel 200 — 10 of the 2 d. Favor of D o —200 and I am Now to Inform you that I have farther Valued on you of this Date in Favor of M Grand N o. 11—One Hundred Pounds Stg. N o. 12—Two Hundred Pounds Making together Three Hundred Pounds St g.
I have the honor to inform you that I have valued on you two Bills in Favor of M Grand for Two Hundred Pounds Sterling each viz of the 15 th. N o. 13 at Usance £200— of this Date 14 £——200 which please to honor and Charge to Account of the United States— I shall Probably farther value on you in a few Days from Lorient for £380 Stg. which will make the whole Amount of them (My Bills) £2500 Stg....
I have not anything of Consequence to advise you of, and am just setting out from this place, of this Date I have Valued on You at 30 days sight in favor of M Grand £100 Sterg. The Bill is Marked with the Letter A: but not numberd—I Expect soon to have the pleasure of writing to You therefore at present Conclude with great respect / Dear Sir / Your Very obed / Servant—
I arrived here the 10 th. and expect to be able to proceed to Cadiz in a few days, the Copys of three short Letters which I wrote to M r. Jefferson, will place before you our Progress untill this day, when I had the pleasure of receiving through the hands of M r. Carmichael The King[s] Letter to the Emperor; informing him that it would be better the Peace should be made in Morocco than in...
I Beg leave to Refer you to the Copy of what I wrote M. Jefferson today, to which I have nothing to Add relative to M. Lamb or Myself. The Accession of this Court to the Treaty with France Holland and Sweden seems highly probable, if a Judgement may be made from several Circumstances taken and Compared together, and the Consequences that are Drawn Here, are, that a Counter Treaty will be...