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You have been lately gratified with such copious communications from this quarter, that I have been the more remiss in mine, not wishing to encumber you with too much matter at once. We have read your Report to the Senate in the case of Mr: Smith, and the printed documents together with Mr: Smith’s vindication; but the volume of evidence communicated by the President I have not seen, and am...
I reached Boston on Saturday Evening the 10th: inst: and came out to Quincy on Sunday afternoon, with Cousin Shaw—Our parents are well; my Mother is wonderfully recovered, and seems to me to be as active & busy as ever about her family—this is a great comfort to me, and will help to render solitude in some measure supportable. . I feel, that there will be ample time to reflect on my future...
I do not know what was the date of my last to you, nor of yours to me, nor is it material to decide on whose part the last omission happend. You may have learn’d from some of my former letters, that I was much engaged, that no opportunity presented itself, to determine me to write at one time rather than another, and that although I have always been extremely industrious, I have always found...
August 6th. It is very cold here to day so much so that we can sit comfortably with the windows shut—My Brother suffers very much from this change his nails are quite blue— Miss Hamilton and Mrs. Fisher called on us this morning—Mr. Harrisson is still very sick and I think Mrs F. appears to have some fears concerning his recovery, which from all I can gather, will be very doubtful—I really was...
your Letter of Nov’br 7th allarmd me when I opend it, and Saw that it was in the hand writing of mrs Adams, and I read with trembling—while I rejoice that you have So able a Substitute, I cannot but regret the occasion for it—your hand may be restored to its use again, but your Eyes have reason to complain that you have used them too hardly. in this instance only—have you been a hard master to...
This morning Dr. Physick to whom I have submitted myself informed me that my complaint had nothing to do with Dropsy whatever; but that nothing could be done for me unless I would undergo an operation, which would be momentary; but cannot be performed until Cooler weather: after which he will ensure me better health than I have had for years— My brothers is exactly similar; excepting that his...
yesterdays Mail brought us the Nomination s to foreign Courts, yours of course, was to England. altho no event could have been so agreable to me, as your return to America. I feel a relief that that you have left the cold region of the North; and come so much nearer to me, where I can hope, with the return of peace, a freer intercourse with you, the only solace left me, to compensate for your...
July 19 An old friend in the shape of St. Anthony has his acquaintance with so much ardour I have not been able to exert myself to day to any purpose—This Eveng however I have read the Rejoind admirable—All nor aught to be so advanced the most nobly defended—The poor Worm must crawl on his belly for the rest of his days and it would be degrading to trample on him and crush him lower—When a man...
Last night I Closed my Letter to you and shall send it to Mr Jenks’s care this Morning. I determine not to delay writing from day to day, till it becomes urkessome, but to finish my story and then go on regularly—theres a good resolution—I shall now begin by telling you a peice of News—Call all your fortitude to your aid before you proceed– here pause a moment . . . do you think yourself...
The present period is more interesting to this Country than any since the adoption of The Federal Constitution The House of Representatives after a three weeks debate on their answer to The Speech of The President have at length entered on Serious business. The fortifying our Ports and harbours. Finishing and equipping our Frigates Purchasing some large Merchantmen to be converted into Sloops...
Upon this day solemnized to me, by the anniversary of the death of my beloved Sister, and by the recent event of yesterday, which has cut off an other Relative from the Parent Stock, by the death of our Friend mr William Smith. my mind is so much affected, that I shall feel a releif in communicating my feelings.—I am still living, lingering upon the confines, of the Grave, where e’er this day,...
The vessel which was up for Hamburgh by which I promised to write has changed her Voyage, and the vessel for London is just upon the point of sailing, so that I have only time to inform you that your old Friend William Vans Murray is appointed your successer. This will give you pleasure, because he is a sensible Worthy Man, and a firm Friend to his Country. You will now be released, and...
Nothing worthy of Notice occurred yesterday, excepting a visit from Mrs. Hopkinson; and a Letter from Hariet Welsh brought by Miss H. Otis, who is come to this place to Nurse Mrs. Delavand whose recovery is deemed impossible—Miss Welsh informs me in her Letter, that John is gaining in standing at Cambridge: but I do not know what sources of information she has , although she states it to be...
I have received two Letters from you, since my arrival in this city. the sickness of your Brother Thomas must be my excuse for not sooner noticing the first, which I certainly should have done immediatly if your Father had not told me that he had written to you, and particularly answerd that part which proposed a visit to us. I certainly cannot have the least objection but should be most...
Bad news still keeps pouring on us and your prophecies are too fatally accomplished It is to day announced in the Papers that we have lost Fort Erie that Chauncey is driven back to Sackets Harbour and that Sir James Prevost with a large force was preparing to attack it the great Ship was launched and they had complete command of the Lake another of our Frigates was destroyed the Adams &c &c—...
As Congress are now up for this Season, you will be thinking of returning as soon as the Roads will permit, and that will be soon, unless we should have a renewal of winter. the two last weeks of Feb’ry and March as far as it is gone, has been very fine weather. uncommonly so, the grass springs, and the trees bud, too soon I fear for a climate so liable to sudden changes; I fear you will not...
Seeing in the paper of yesterday, that a vessel call’d the Thorne of New York, was to Sail on the 5th of the Month from Elizabeth city, for St Petersburgh, and to stop at Gottenburgh, I have embraced the opportunity to write to you, altho my notice is So short. to inform you that we are all well. including your sons in this number, who are now here, at their Spring vacation. I have directed...
Your Letters arrive so regularly that it is scarcely necessary to acknowledge the receipt of them. by your last I find you have at last been obliged to sacrifice your opinion to the majority, and I pray to Heaven good consequences may result from it—The news which we are continually recieving makes it of little consequence, but it appears to me, that they there would be less dis-grace in...
The heartfelt delight I experienced at the reception of your last favour No. 11 is not to be expressed. there is always a sort of heavy anxiety attending the knowledge of our friends being at Sea, that neither reason or Wisdom can entirely subdue, and the news of a safe arrival, produces feelings of Joy, and gratitude, which is difficult to describe. how keen these feelings must be, when the...
I have lived long in expectation of the pleasure of receiving a letter from my Dear Brother but at length I am reduced to despair; and am led to inquire what has prevented the fullfillment of a promise which you made at your departure upon my requesting you to write;— I hope you did not suppose that my absence during your visit arrose from any inattention towards yourself;— most certainly if I...
I take it for granted that you will neither in public or private Life do any thing which you are unwilling to own, or to affix your Name. I write to ask you if uninvited you attended the Caucus at Washington of which mr Bradley was President? It is not the scandalous publication in Jacksons Register at Philadelphia, which has induced me to ask this question, but because I have considerd it as...
This Anniversary is So well known to you, that you will not wonder; that it always returns with a Solemn knell to me. how many of these days in a year have we to call to remembrance, when Some Root, or Branch has been Severd from us? and now one of the third generation is added to the number. Catharine has lost her Daughter with the Measles. both Parents are much afflicted. I wished to have...
I wrote you from Brussels on the 19 th: inst t: and acquainted you with the progress of my journey to that place. I left it on the 20 th: with the Diligence, and reached Valenciennes in safety at an early hour of the evening. There I was deserted by my fellow travellers whom I met on the banks of the Mease, but in the course of the day I had become tolerably acquainted with my new companions...
I think I will not give to any passenger any Letters, unless a Letter of introduction, for however urgent they are to be charged with them, I find frequently that they lay months before they are deliverd. If my Letters cannot have the Novelty of youth to recommend them, They will lose their most valuable quality, and be very dull in their old Age—like a twice told tale, and very like, better...
Your Brother Thomas has performed the painfull office of announcing to you the death of your Brother Charles. with what a weight of sorrow is my bosom opprest, when I reflect, that he was cutt down in the bloom of Life, in the midst of his days. he is numberd with the dead; it becomes me in Silence to mourn; mourn over him living, I have for a long time, and now he is gone.—the tender...
July 16 Mrs. Jackson and her daughter called late and took Mary to Tea at Mrs. T Willings, from which sh whence she returned at a little after ten oclock; much amused and pleased with two new acquaintance she found, Miss Caroline Jackson, and Miss White, a Grand daughter of the Bishop’s 17 What a ridiculous scrape Judge Johnson has got into in South Carolina! I cannot conceive what his motive...
I rejoice that I can begin the new year without a Repetition of any mournfull, or afflictive Family dispensation, and that I can congratulate you of upon the Life of your Father, and his continued Health, upon that also of your Sons, your Brother, and upon the restoration of your Sister, and last of all that I am still enabled to hold a pen & can write to you, altho frequently assaild by...
Mr Depand has sent his Clerk here this Evening, to say that he would sail tomorrow in the Milo, captain Glover of this Town. the notice is short, and I should regret it the more if I had not already written to you by this same vessel. I have acknowledgd the receit of your Letters No 66, 23 Nov’br not first received, than of 26 of December No 67, and this day by way of England, your Letter of...
My Brother much as usual. The impossibility of hastening the cure of his very painful disease in consequence of the heat affects his spirits very much and makes him fretful and gloomy; ever anticipating evil, and unwilling to enjoy present good—poor fellow it is surely very hard to know he could be relieved in a few days, and at the same time to suffer not only the pain, but the idea which the...
In my last I told you I believe how inadequate I found myself to the task of answering your very painful letter of the 12 th — Indeed my beloved friend my heart had at that moment recieved so deep a wound I scarce know how I acquired resolution sufficient to acknowledge it— Days are elapsed and I have in vain implored the friendly aid of reason, but she like the world in the hour of trial is...
My Dear Nephew could not suppose a Friend to merit, could read a Paragraph in last Saturdays Paper, without feeling themselves gratified, by finding that the opinion of Persons of the highest eminence entirly coincided with their own— He who has obstinately, & undeviateingly persevered in a course of Study, who “can bring back at Eve, the manners of the Morn immaculate,” & steadily pursue the...
All the anxieties which you express in your very affectionate letter No 7 which has just been brought me are I trust by this time removed, and you have probably recieved all the letters which were directed to Gottenburg and which I believe duly acknowledge the reception of yours and I have now the satisfaction to inform you that the two last have arrived unopened. We are all much astonished at...
By mr william Appleton going to England in a Russian Ship I embrace the opportunity of writing to you, and of acknowledging the receipt of your Letters No 52 october 25 of Novbr 19th No 53. and of Febry 1st No 56—for all of which you have my thanks—your Father has also received your Letters of Sepbr 3d No 26. of october 15 No 27 Novbr 13 No 28. which I hope he will acknowledge by this...
Since the date of my last July 11 th I have received an Authentic account of Your appointment as Minister Plenipo. to the Court of Portugal. it was the last nomination which the President made, before the rising of Congress, and took place after your Father came home, without its ever being hinted to him. the appointment was agreed to as mr otis informs me, unanimously by the Senate. this is...
I fear that my receiving your letters so late may be some disadvantage to you. The information I shall now give you perhaps may reach you too late. By the last post I received your favor of the 14 th instant and this morning went into town for the one dated the 11 th which Harbach brought. The newspapers before this time must have informed you concerning some of the business you have written...
At length after long expectation your No 16 has arrived. Capt Cushing Called yesterday upon us, and delivered the Letters for Pappa, and amongst them I found one from yourself which was the only Letter I received except 2 from Dr Welsh. I have been rather unfortunate respecting Letters, mine being so long delayd by being under Cover to Mr Storer that my friends one and all have taken up a...
Since I wrote you last I have made two excursions one to Holland, and one of a Week to the Hyde the seat of mr Brand Hollis. Here I was both entertaind and delighted. In the first place I must describe mr Hollis to you. He is a Neat, nice Batchelor of about 50 years old a learned Sensible Antiquarian. The late mr Hollis whose Name he bears could not have chosen a better Representitive to have...
Your Letter of Feb ry 12 th reachd me on the last of April, and gave me Sincere pleasure and satisfaction to learn that both you and your Brother were in good Health and spirits, and that in the midst of such a mighty Revolution as you have been witness too, You have beheld the still greater Phœnomenon of order Peace and tranquility, that they may be durable to our good Batavian Friends, and a...
You will no doubt receive from the President of the United States permission to return home, as he has been pleased to appoint you to an important office in the judiciary of the United States. the unanimous approbation of the Senate, and the Satisfaction which all parties unite in expressing must weigh in your mind powerfully. From What ever motives this general consent arrises, it proves,...
We are still without Letters from you. The Secretary of State received one dated in December; but no private Letter has reached any of your Family of a later date than early in Nov’br, now six months. I have noticed by the last English papers that many mails were due from Hamburgh. I fear that Letters from you have been intercepted, or stoped. I have written to you a Number of times since I...
Your Letter last evening received from Bilboa relieved me from much anxiety, for having a day or two before received Letters from your Pappa, Mr. Thaxter and Brother in which packet I found none from you, nor any mention made of you, my mind ever fruitfull in conjectures was instantly allarmed. I feard you was sick, unable to write, and your Pappa unwilling to give me uneasiness had concealed...
Mrs Hay call’d, and left me your Letter. tho I have not written to you before I have had you constantly upon my mind, and have been anxious for your Health. I have heard of you several times. I think you would mind an advantage in drinking valerian & camomile Tea, for those spasm’s you complain of. I am not able to say to you as yet, when I shall go to Newyork. I have received only one Letter...
I recieved last night your charming letter of the 16 and was much distressed to learn that your mother had again been unwell the weather here is quite cold winthin this few days and we all seem to revive I hope e’re this you have had a change as favorable and that you may all soon enjoy the blessing of health— I was so unwell when I last wrote I scarcely answer’d any part of your letter assure...
I had the pleasure to receive your kind Letter of the 18 th of May by Barnard and was much releived by being informed that our Mother was recovering her health as rapidly as could be expected— I feared from not having received a Single line from her; that she was not so well as my friends represented her to me we have had Letters from all my other friends except herself since our arrivall and...
I thank you for your obliging Letter of the 31 st Ultimo I do not know that I should have replied to it before the 5 th. of next Month had not my Daughter receved a late Letter from you & in which you inform her that the Letters you had recived from America had determined you to proceed to Lisbon as soon as possible but that you was diserous of takeing London in your way, I need not tell you...
Lyde sailed the 24th. with a long Letter for you from me, and I have now commenced N 6, which I propose giving to the Care of Mr. Storer he talks of going next week. If so, this will be but short. But alas my Brother 14 weeks have elapsd since you left us, and we not yet any account of your arrival. Hopes and fears alternately possess my mind, and I can not banish anxiety upon your account....
I have taken my pen, to frame an appology to you my Dear Brother. There are so many that offer themselvs to me, that I am almost at a loss, which to avail myself of as most sattisfactory to you—should I tell you that no opportunity of forwarding my Letter to you had been the cause of my silence since the 9th of December or that not having received any answer to my many long Letters I had...
Last fryday I closed my Last to you and Mr. Storer sailed on Monday from Graves End so that it is now on its way to Greet you with health peace and Contentment I hope. A saturday the 17th. we went to see Mrs. Siddons, in the Character of Desdemona. Altho I saw her under many disadvantages, the part not being such as I shold have chosen, and her present situation renders it impossible for her...
This my Brother is the day appropriated for the celebration of the Queens Birth day. It really comes in june but as the Kings is in that Month they defer its celebration to this season. Kings and Princess you know may do any thing which their power will permit with impunity. But to tell you—at 2 oclock we were dressd, Mamma in a sattin of the new fashiond Colour which is Called the spanish...
Every day, hour, and minute, your absence mon chere frere , pains me more and more. We left last saturday the Hotell and have got settled in peace and quiettness in our own House in this Place. The situation is pleasant. I would walk, my Brother is gone. I would ride, my Brother is gone. I would retire to my chaimber. Alas, I meet him not there. I would meet him in his appartment—but—where is...