You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, John Quincy

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy"
Results 951-1000 of 1,153 sorted by editorial placement
August 2 We last night paid our intended visit to the Masonic Hall and were received by the Grand Master with great politeness—We found the gas lights burning which I am informed was a special favour—The Grand Lodge is very handsome, the decorations showy and the Seat of the Grand Master placed on a sort of throne supported by pillowsand an arched dome—Having had the honour of being seated in...
August 3 After despatching my Letters we received Georges N. 10 with one from Mrs. Porter in London in which she is desirous that you should dispose of 20 copies of some work written by her father which she has just published, the first Vol of which she has sent to Mr. Gracie with an order to send them to you, and she has fixed the price in England at half a pou 18S. 6d a Vol. The poor old...
August 4 Your N. 10 was brought me this morning containing the order upon the Bank for which I thank you—I am more uneasy than I can express at the part of your Letter concerning Kitty and cannot possibly guess what it can mean—Surely there are persons in the world so singularly constructed that their minds are utterly incapable of improvement from experience which generally teaches the most...
August 6th. It is very cold here to day so much so that we can sit comfortably with the windows shut—My Brother suffers very much from this change his nails are quite blue— Miss Hamilton and Mrs. Fisher called on us this morning—Mr. Harrisson is still very sick and I think Mrs F. appears to have some fears concerning his recovery, which from all I can gather, will be very doubtful—I really was...
August 7 After closing my journal I received your very affectionate Letter N 11 containing another order on the Bank. I cannot express the feelings of gratitude which swell my heart with unutterable thankfulness for your kindness to my Brother; who went through a slight operation without any great appearance of suffering—The worst part of the business is that it must be repeated four or five...
August 8 Towards evening my brother became much better. To keep his thoughts from his immediate sufferings and to amuse him with conversation is the best remedy, and produces the most wonderful change both in his spirits and countenance; and the most difficult part of the business will be to wean him from the isolated habits he has acquired by his unfortunate mode of living; which made him...
August 9 The Boston papers announce the death of one of our Grandees James Perkins—I think I recollect him many years ago; but I am not sure that I was acquainted with him. Was he not brother to S. H. Perkins? They tell a ridiculous story here about Mrs. S. Perkins She came to consult Dr Physick concerning a desease to which she is subject in her throat, and which will finally destroy her—When...
August 10. Mr. Joanoff and Baron Maltitz and Mr & Mrs. Pederson and Mrs. Markoe called—I had gone out to visit Mrs. Lowndes who I understood had arrived; but I found that Mr. Lowndes had come alone to consult Physicians—He came down to see me, and I was shocked at his appearance—if the Doctors even set him on his legs again, they will have performed a miracle—I also called on General Brown who...
I enclose the Letter just received I cannot guess why it was written to me— MHi : Adams Papers.
The last budget from Europe was indeed a fruitful one according to Walsh’s paper—They appear to suffer every horror beginning with Fires, Plagues, Pestilence, Famine, Massacre’s, civil War, and tremendous Storms—All these are to be found in the different news—We have also a slight share of calamity, as the Country fever is said to rage again, and New York is violently afflicted by the Yellow...
I forgot when I closed my last to answer your question concerning my brothers baggage—He wishes it to be put into some safe place until it can be reshiped to New Orleans; to which place he intends returning as soon as his health is reestablished, unless he could exchange the situation he holds there for something which would be an occupation, one an equivalent in point of pecuniary matters...
August 17 Mr. Cook called to inform me he intended to return to Washington tomorrow; and while he was sitting with me the Doctor again went through the operation on my brother again which was as in the former case attended with complete success. For two hours after he suffered great anguish, but I gave him a small dose of laudanum which soothed the irritation of his nerves; and he was much...
By some thoughtlessness I dated my journal wrong the last time I wrote, and only anticipated my congratulations on the anniversary of Charles’s birth—My Brother is not so well to day, and suffers much from the heat. Indeed the changes are so frequent, and so great, in his complaint, that I vibrate incessantly between hope and despair—The Doctor is thought infallible and when his opinion is...
August 19 Notwithstand the budget just sent, there is still some thing left to be said in answer to some observations of yours concerning place hunters—As you say they certainly do wish to live in your thoughts ; but their pride is hurt when you suffer this to appear in your manner —Men often do things which however they feel ashamed of doing; or in other words they cannot bear to be made...
22 It every hour threatens rain but no rain falls. Mr H— says his Corn Crops will be very fine but it is only a small part of New Jersey that has not suffered—It is three weeks since my brother has been out of the House, and I cannot prevail on him to stir abroad—Indeed it requires no trifling exertion to get him out of his room—The novelty of seeing his friends has worn off, and he is again...
August 24 As there has not been one incident which could induce me to write I have omitted my journal altogether. We had a visit yesterday from Mr. Saul and I determined to send Coachman home with the Carriage and Horses as we had made no use of it for three weeks; and it is no longer safe to ride in the environs of Philadelphia—When he arrives I beg you will desire him to see after Ben, who...
August 25 Went to the Presbyterian Church with Miss Pardon ; and heard a tolerable discourse from 12 Chapter of Paul to the Romans. Mr. Arbuckle is a very inanimate cold Preacher, and his style remarkably plain, and his language almost coarse considering the general refinement of modern language—He told us that Satan was the master of all knowledge; but that he knew nothing of love! That was a...
August 27. I see by the papers that Mr. Harrisson has lost his daughter Mrs. Mason—This is a severe stroke, but I believe it has been anticipated for some months by her friends—was it in child birth? and did the child live? She was too delicate a Blossom to live through the trials attached to married life, there was no stamina to enable her to support suffering—Mr. Douroughty is likewise...
August 28. One of the companies having turned out in the State House Gardens, makes the view from our house quite picturesque, and the scene very animated, as they are all in fine Uniforms Drums Fifes &c &c—There is something so gaudy, and imposing in the display of Military pomp, even under its worst aspect, that it is not surprising that the people under Military despotisms should be so...
After closing my Letter yesterday Mr G. Harrison called on us and sat with us near an hour—He is a singular being and has a very energetic style of conversation thickly beset with ornaments now nearly exploded—There is however something odd in his manner—Speaking of the Post Master here—He said that he was a defaulter to a large amount and that he believed it was only for the sake of his Wife...
August 30 It is worth while to be absent a short time from home for the sake of receiving such delightful Letters as yours and Georges of to day, not to mention Mr. Smiths; when you condescend to trifle you trifle so prettily it were almost to be wished that your gaiété de cœur could be more frequently called pretty—Georges short trip to the Clouds was likewise of infinite service, and he...
Sept 1 My first visitor this day was the General who looks much better than he did and is I think in a fair way of doing well: though he will probably never entirely recover his pristine strength or firmness—He was inclined to be very communicative, and had entered upon political subjects pretty seriously, when young Mr. Paul came in and stopped the conversation—He said he hoped that you and...
Sept 3. The Evening closed with a very heavy thundergust After which we had a most delicious evening—During the last Night there was an alarm of Fire, and for two hours the City was in an uproar—I do not know to what extent the damage amounted, and have only heard that it began in a Blacksmith’s shop and had been smothering throughout the day of Sunday—King Joseph and Mr. Anduago met it seems...
Mr. J. Hopkinson; Miss Dale, Mr Ewing; Miss Meredith, Miss Frazier, Mr Connell, and Mr N. Biddle, and Mary Mr. Knight, all called and delayed our dinner until three o clock—We had of course the greatest variety of conversation on almost all subjects excepting politicks; of which to my great satisfaction we had not a word—The Sketch of Old England is quite the rage but Ewing says Paulding is...
Another attack of St Anthony confines me to my chamber since I wrote last and as it has been attended by head ache &c. with considerable fever I put myself into the hands of the Doctor; who is in hopes of eradicating the complaint altogether, though it is so stubborn it will require time, patience, and some confinement to my chamber—You have been too long accustomed to see me suffer in this...
Mr & Mrs. Bache Mrs. Dallas, and Mr U S. Capt Biddle called but I did not see them—Your letter was brought me, and you need not fear my leaving it about; as I am in the habit of filing and locking up my letters immediately after reading them—it is true that there are great machinations against you at this time going forward; and that they must and will continue as the time draws nearer which...
Yesterday passed without any material change—Mrs. Harrison called and Major Jackson and in the afternoon Mr. & Mrs. Walsh but I did not see them—They have just returned from Baltimore—Doctor Physick informed me that he hoped my brothers health would be firmly re-established in the course of a short time—I think it probable however he will operate once more— This morning I ventured down stairs...
Nothing worthy of Notice occurred yesterday, excepting a visit from Mrs. Hopkinson; and a Letter from Hariet Welsh brought by Miss H. Otis, who is come to this place to Nurse Mrs. Delavand whose recovery is deemed impossible—Miss Welsh informs me in her Letter, that John is gaining in standing at Cambridge: but I do not know what sources of information she has , although she states it to be...
16 Sept Finding myself very weak after my tedious confinement to my chamber I determined to accept the invitation of Mrs. Hopkinson, and took my passage in the Steam Boat accompanied by Mary—The day was fine but contrary to our usual good fortune, we found no one with whom to have a chat, excepting an old Quaker Lady; who was on her travels for the first time in her life; and full of terrors,...
19 Sept My last I believe closed on this day; I will therefore continue the account of our proceedings—While we were at Table the Count and his daughter paid us a visit and left Cards—and in the Evening we received an invitation to a water party at four o’clock tomorrow afternoon; and to spend the Evening which we graciously accepted. After which we strolled to the burying ground, where Miss...
21 Sept Still at Borden Town methinks I hear you say? “I hope my dear your head is not quite turned by all the fine things you meet?” I answer I hope not, but almost fear to ask myself the question—My last I believe informed you of the party at Mont Point Breeze. This Eveng the Count and his family spent here with Mrs. Hopkinson; and we laboured hard to amuse them, and I fear did not atchieve...
24 Sept We dined at the Counts and while walking in the garden he told me an excellent anecdote of a beautiful Quaker Lady who had paid him a visit—During their promenade in the Garden they came to the figures of Cupid and Psyche who are represented looking tenderly at each other. She turned to him with great naiveté and said, “had she been so situated” she would not have remained long in that...
27 Sept—In the Evening the Count and Countess came to visit us and sat above an hour conversing very pleasantly though not very favourably of Miss Keene who appears to be no favorite with him notwithstanding her evident desire to attract his attention—The young Lady seems to have taken a sort of partiality for me; and politely expressed a wish that I would prolong my stay in Borden Town as my...
It is my intention to return to you early next week unless my Dr. forbids; I will therefore beg you to send me some Cash to pay his bill although I fear you will think me very extravagant—. I am so surrounded by company, that I have not been able to continue my journal—Going this Even’ to Mrs. Hopkinson’s and to Mrs. Manego’s—Elopements appear to be the fashion among the medical tribe—Dr...
2 October The day was so stormy we were entirely shut up but I received several visits notwithstanding—Miss Verplank and her father Mr. Lee &c and Mr. Connell who intends to visit Washington in a short time. We are becoming dull and fretful and I expect to embrace you on Tuesday or Wednesday next at farthest—Dr Physick is unwilling to part with me as I have gone through the operation but he...
When I closed my last sheet I expected to be laid up again but Dr. Physick has decided that it is unnecessary at present and I am still at large. He has however determined to operate on my brother again tomorrow morning which will delay our return untill the middle of the week. I went out and returned several visits and afterwards took a family dinner at Walsh’s where I met de Menou Mr. Allen...
6 October Mr. Smith called to make a visit to my brother, stating to me, that he was so interesting a man he was desirous to become acquainted with him; to all of which of course I assented—I am trying to read Madlle. Le Norman’s memoirs of the Empress Josephine, which however I find so inflated and bombastic, I cannot read much at a time—It is lent me by Mrs. Manigault, and I must peruse it...
I thank you for the present of your Book and your kind letter of the 24th. September. It was wisely done to collect all those papers together and arrange them in order that posterity might see them in one view without ransacking twenty libraries for the newspapers and the pamphlets of the day. Without this prudent precaution they would probably have never been all read by any one individual....
I received the letter you did me the honor to write me, on the 7th. of this month. Inclosing a copy of an additional return of the Census of Alabama in virtue of an act of Congress of the 7. of March 1822 / and salute you with the respect and affection / of your obid: & very humble Servant MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of the 7th. Vol. of Wheaton’s Reports, the supplemental census of Alabama, and the commission of Tench Ringgold; as Marshall of the Dist. of Columbia, untill the end of the next session of the Senate. With great consideration / I have the honour to be / sir, yr. obed. servt, DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
Our poor George is so much better to day that we shall probably be able to get home sooner than I at first anticipated although I cannot fix the time as the arm is not yet in a state to curve. The inflamation has entirely subsided and the feverish symptoms are so much diminished that the Doctor says his case is more thriving than could possibly have been expected—We this morning changed his...
Mr Young the Bar keeper visits Washington to day and I write a few lines to say that though George is doing well the inflamation of the Arm subsides so slowly it will not be possible to flex it for some days and our stay here I fear will be considerably lengthened—You must not be anxious as he is doing well but makes too many efforts to help himself which makes me tremble for the arm in future...
Having forgotten to order Georges bed to be removed into my dressing room I now write to ask you to tell Antoine to have it prepared and all his paraphernalia placed within his reach—He is much better to day after having had a very bad night and a great encrease of fever in consequence of too great excitement during the day which the Doctor says must be carefully avoided for some time to come...
I have seen many of your poetical effusions, from the time when you were at College, to this last Month. And there are so many indisputible proofs of natural and Social affections, and genuine poetical imagery that if you will had cultivate the muses as much as you have politicks you might have made a Shakespear, a Milton or a Pope, for anything that I know, how “How sweet an Ovid, is in...
I have seen many of your poetical effusions from the time when you were at College, to the last Month, And there are so many indisputable proofs of natural, and social affections, and genuine poetical imagery; that if you had cultivated the muses as much as you have politicks, you might have made a Shakespear, a Milton, or a Pope, for any thing that I know— How sweet an Ovid, is in Murray...
Mr Webster accepts with great pleasure Mr and Mrs Adams invitation to dine on the 18th. MHi : Adams Papers.
Genl Jackson presents his compliments & thanks to Mr & Mrs. Adams for their polite invitation to a Ball at their house on the 8 of Jany— He had designed not to visit during the winter after night owing to his ill health; but their politeness on the present occasion influences him to alter that determination, and he begs leave to say that he will with great pleasure wait upon them on the...
My friend Mgr. Luckett will hand this to you to enquire whether you have had an opportunity to see the President as to his Case. your attention to this matter, will oblige me. you must excuse this trouble as it is a peculiar case. I shall see you as soon as possible as to the florida appointment as I have Some letters to present you— Sincerely your MHi : Adams Papers.
We have arrived safely at this place—after a very fatiguing and anxious journey on account of the roads which are worse than you can imagine— often created apprehensions for the safety of the Horses as the trial was almost beyond their strength— The Country through which we have passed is extremely beautiful but the Mountains, though high cannot compare with those of Silesia The Soil in the...
I enclose a Letter from Mary to Mrs. Gelbot and at the same time have the pleasure to inform you that we are pretty well—Mr. Todd the M.C. has done me the honour to call on me with two other Gentlemen We have four invalids here besides ourselves all elderly men three Virginians and one from Carlisle—The life we lead is so quiet we have not a single incident to note excepting that yesterday was...