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Whereas by Articles of Agreement dated the thirty first day of December eighteen hundred and thirteen, John P. Van Ness of Washington in the District of Columbia sold to George Boyd, then of the same place, the Land and dwelling House herein after described; and in consideration thereof, and of the execution by the said George Boyd, of his bond and obligation of that date, conditioned to pay...
Deed recorded August 21st. 1821.— Whereas George Boyd and James L. Edwards on or about the fourth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen bargained and sold assigned transferred & conveyed unto the undersigned Overton Carr all the right title interest & estate of them the said George Boyd & James L. Edwards of in & to a certain house & lot then in the...
Our George has gained the first prize—and bares his honour meekly—He is a dutiful Son, for he is deeply engaged in Platonick Greek, In obedience to your advice and requisition—and what surprises me more is, that he is becoming an early riser—He was up this Morning before I was—And his Mind appears to be awakned by an Ambition to become an eminent and useful Man—John is at present devoted to...
We find ourselves so very comfortable here and Mr. & Mrs. Graham are so urgent for us to stay until Sunday Night we shall not be at home until Tuesday Evening—As I know you would be very anxious to see us at the time first appointed and might be uneasy I send you a few lines to quiet any unnecessary apprehensions— The Country is beautiful and our reception has been as kind as you can possibly...
O that I had the talent at description of a Homer a Milton or a Walter Scott I would give you a picture of a hill that I have visited with more pleasure than I should mount Ida or Monticello. Mr David Hyslop has been importuning me for seven years to dine with him in Brookline: I have always declined till last Tuesday when taking my grandson George Washington Adams for my guide and aid de camp...
I defer’d the acknowledgement of your very kind Letter of 14’ Augt untill I had completed the object mentiond in the Inclosed Vote—which has undergone a revission by the Corporation, (the first vote not being so full and satisfactory to me ) as I had stipulated was returned to them;) and only a few days since received it corrected— In which you will find I have taken an unauthorized liberty...
Mr. Clay has the pleasure to accept the invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Adams to dinner on thursday the 8h. inst. MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr Pinkney presents his Complements to Mr. & Mrs. Adams and accepts with great pleasure the honour of their invitation to Dinner on Friday this 2d. March. MHi : Adams Papers.
My thanks are due to you, and are most joyfully given, for two copies of your Report on Weights and Measures, one of them elegantly bound. Though I cannot say and perhaps shall never be able to say that I have read it, yet I have turned over Leaves of it enough to see that it is a Mass of historical, philosophical chemical mathematical and political knowledge which no Industry in this country...
Bishop Chevreuse regrets that it will not be in his power to wait upon Mr. and Mrs. Adams, on Monday next, as he will be out of town by previous engagement. MHi : Adams Papers.
Mrs Porter’s compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams & Miss Helen & requests the pleasure of their company on friday evening PHi : Dreer Collection.
Having arrived safely without any “hair breadth scapes” to relate, I have little or nothing to say, but, that we are well, that the Horses were very much frighten’d at their trip in the Steam boat, and that Dash is the admiration of every one; so much so that Joseph is very apprehensive we shall have him stolen— In Baltimore it is said that there is little or no fever—we remained there but an...
We have arrived safely at this place without much trouble and the Horses stood it pretty well, but Mary is quite sick with one of her fevers, and I cannot tell how long we may be delayed—She is as usual quite unruly, and will do little or nothing that is recommended, so that I have ample scope for repentance at the charge I have undertaken, which is burthensome beyond all calculation, the...
16 Wrote two Letters in the morning and amused myself with reading Miss Porters new Novel—Mary being much better we went again to see Mrs. Sergeant who detained us to Tea—Was introduced to Mr. Phew and his Son the latter of whom is a woe begone widower who is very desirous of being sent as Secretary of Legation with some of our Ministers abroad—He has never allowed his hair to be Cut since the...
As Mary is much better to day I hasten to write you that the Letter of yesterday may not create unnecessary anxiety—After taking an Emetic she was so much relieved I found it useless to send for a Physician and had resolution sufficient to starve her notwithstanding her freting which produced the best possible effects—This morning the alarming hoarseness with the fever have entirely...
Mr. Shaw brought me your letter last night of the 29 and you may be assured I will attend to the confidential injunction it contained— At the same time I will take the liberty of expressing my doubts as to the propriety of shrinking thus for ever from any manifestation of the publick feeling which it is natural to expect (and which with our Institutions which are altogether popular) it is...
Your Letter was brought to my chamber door and thrown in by your father this morning before I was up he having heard me express some anxiety to hear from you yesterday morning was so good as to give it me as soon as it arrived—I am delighted to learn that you adhere to your resolution of leaving Washington on the 20th. and shall be careful to have a conveyance for you to Quincy from Dedham—The...
This will probably be the last time I shall write you as your journey will commence soon after the receipt of this Letter. My present object is to mention a plan which has occurred to me concerning your father who is very desirous of going to Commencement but who is evidently too weak to support the fatigue of the day without something is done to make it easy. My plan is to engage two chambers...
The style in which my Letter of the 3d was written, pretty clearly evinced by its apologetic nature, the fear I felt of giving offence; and your answer has proved those fears were not unfounded: Surely I have never doubted the or disputed the all distinguished attentions you have received from your Countrymen, and still less ever suggested the idea that you courted them—You must permit me to...
This Indenture made this twentieth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty one, Between John P. Van Ness and Marcia Van Ness, his wife, both of the City of Washington, of the one part, and John Quincy Adams Esquire, of Boston, in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, now abiding in the said City of Washington, of the other part,...
The Enterprize has just arrived and brought all the stray baggage which will be delivered to us tomorrow morning—A Gentleman has just called to announce to us this very acceptable inform news who says he made every exertion to expedite its return—Of the Coachman and Elizabeth we have heard nothing but are in hopes they will be here tomorrow night and should they arrive I propose to leave New...
Mr Sergeant sent me your Letter yesterday morning and I thank you for the pleasant information it contained concerning the health of all at home—I wish I could give you the same assurance concerning my little party but the Coachman is still very ill and Elizabeth is also quite unwell. George is on the whole better but occasionally much indisposed and subject to faintness—Mary and I do better...
The Inclosed extract from a Letter I lately rec’d from my friend, Dr Nicholas, wch. I read to my dearly beloved friend yr. father soon after it came to my hand—he was so much pleased with it that he requested me to send you a Copy; And as his wishes are to me , the delights of obedience, I have promptly given it; presuming however that Dr N wd not wish it should be made public as comeing from...
Finding your orchards had faild, I sent to Princeton and directed my Foreman to pick out Six Casks of the best Cyder the farm had produced this year (not haveing any of the preceeding year that I consider’d worth transporting) and have them carefully drawn off into other Barrells, which has been done, and I received them here, this morning about 2 oclock, fearing a return of severe frost, I...
Mr Webster regrets that a previous engagement deprives him of the pleasure of accepting Mr & Mrs Adam’s invitation to dine on Thursday. MHi : Adams Papers.
Contrary to my established habit for many years I must now become an intercessor for a candidate. You must remember a virtuous & industrious lady old lady the widow Owen who lived to be 90 odd years of age, and maintained an always an excellent character and was highly esteemed by your mother. You must remember also young Hollis her grandson who lived some time in our family and was the...
Mr. Clay has the pleasure to accept the invitation of Mr. Adams and Mrs Adams to dinner on Saturday next. MHi : Adams Papers.
The documents you Send me from Mr. Williams have been to me for Several Years the most inscrutable Mystery in nature. My mind Suggest but one hypothesis for the Solution of it and that is not Satisfactory. I have explained it to Mr Williams. If the Mecklenburg resolutions were genuine and had been published at the time, they would have Sheltered me from the Vengeance of the Furies visited...
I beg leave to introduce Mr. John D. Herbert, a respectable gentleman of this place, who I understand wishes to see you upon business. I am, Dr Sir, / most respectfully / your obedt. servt. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
As you are in some degree releived from the pressure of Public Business, by the termination of congressional calls upon your labours—I avail myself of the leisure it may afford you in reading the Inclosed extract of a Letter recently rec’d from my worthy Friend Dr: Nicholls.—it may appear somewhat strange that he should refer to you in what he says about the slave trade.—but a few words will...
We have accomplished our journey thus far as well as I anticipated but my brother was so ill this morning I was fearful we should be obliged to remain at Baltimore for some days. As however he is better this Eveng he has determined to go on in the Stage and reach Philadelphia tomorrow morning—I shall therefore send the Carriage round to join us there— Our Stage party consists of Mr Pratt of P....
We arrived here yesterday morning after a rapid tho’ not remarkably pleasant journey from French Town at ten o’clock and by dint of absolute starving my brother accomplished his journey but in a state of complete exhaustion— We immediately sent for Dr. Physick who finds his case a dreadful one, though we trust not hopeless—His decision was prompt as to the necessity of a painful operation; but...
We have moved into our new lodgings and are very comfortably established with a kind old Lady who is very attentive and obliging—I should have answered Georges Letter yesterday but was confined all day by one of my worst head aches, the remains of which will prevent my writing to him to day— Our residence is at Mrs. Purdon’s 62 South 6th. Street between Chesnut and Walnut directly opposite the...
Mr. Hopkinson came yesterday to see me and in the evening accompanied me to the Academy of Arts which is prettily arranged as you already know but it is said to be better this year than common—There are two Salvator Rosa’s belonging to Count Survilier that are very fine an excellent likeness of Poleteca one of Mr Calhoun and a striking likeness of Mrs. Bloomfield which is really a beautiful...
Is Hugh Nelson going to Mexico? What is to become of Genl S.—? Nobody suits here but Poinsett—Surely this must be Back Stairs—I know you will not answer one of these questions but God Bless you. MHi : Adams Papers.
How it happened that I omitted to say I had received N. 1 I do not know—It was so kind a letter and I felt it so sensibly, it seems wonderful to me that I did not acknowledge it. I remember Mr. Gadsden very well. But how came you to pass the Eveng. at the Secretary’s? I am very glad of it, and hope it is not War in disguise? We are all doing well here, and only want you to join us for a short...
Would I were a Poet and could celebrate this day as it deserves to be—Few Natal days would admit of greater scope for sincere congratulation or warmer praise, could I write like Madame de Stael, I would immortalize it—This is a day which has not only proved a blessing to your family, but is equally so to your Country to which you are so earnestly devoted—and who although apparently cold must...
Your N. 3 arrived yesterday and I thank you for the lines although I cannot say I was much pleased with the close of your Epistle which was too gloomy for my taste—Last Eveng. I accompanied Mr. Walsh to a concert and was delighted with Mr Phillips who has a charming voice and sings with great taste and science—Miss Davis gave us the Mocking Bird, and proved that contrary to common notions on...
This morning Dr. Physick to whom I have submitted myself informed me that my complaint had nothing to do with Dropsy whatever; but that nothing could be done for me unless I would undergo an operation, which would be momentary; but cannot be performed until Cooler weather: after which he will ensure me better health than I have had for years— My brothers is exactly similar; excepting that his...
July 15th. Mr Sergeant called and talked of Paris in such exstacies, that my old suspicion returned as it regards a foreign Mission—Ewing told me that Mr. Calhoun was gone to Newport—We heard he was not going—rode out on the Ridge road which is lined with beautiful Country seats one of which Sergeant has hired for the Summer. He seems desirous of purchasing it as he say’s Country Seats are dog...
July 16 Mrs. Jackson and her daughter called late and took Mary to Tea at Mrs. T Willings, from which sh whence she returned at a little after ten oclock; much amused and pleased with two new acquaintance she found, Miss Caroline Jackson, and Miss White, a Grand daughter of the Bishop’s 17 What a ridiculous scrape Judge Johnson has got into in South Carolina! I cannot conceive what his motive...
July 19 An old friend in the shape of St. Anthony has his acquaintance with so much ardour I have not been able to exert myself to day to any purpose—This Eveng however I have read the Rejoind admirable—All nor aught to be so advanced the most nobly defended—The poor Worm must crawl on his belly for the rest of his days and it would be degrading to trample on him and crush him lower—When a man...
My Brother much as usual. The impossibility of hastening the cure of his very painful disease in consequence of the heat affects his spirits very much and makes him fretful and gloomy; ever anticipating evil, and unwilling to enjoy present good—poor fellow it is surely very hard to know he could be relieved in a few days, and at the same time to suffer not only the pain, but the idea which the...
July 22 Major and Mrs. Jackson Mr Ewing and Mr. N. Biddle called on us, all of them talking of nothing but your rejoinder, which is thought even better of than the remarks—They told me to tell you that there was no dissenting voice on the subject, and Mr. R. was universally condemned—He is quite Kilt so dont disturb him, but let him get what rest he can under such circumstances—George Harrison...
At the request of our worthy friend and excellent Neighbour Dr Amos Holbrook; I transmit you the inclosed papers, praying you to convey them to the Superintendent of the Patent Office, If I knew Dr Thornton was there I would have transmitted them to him. But I think I have heard some other Gentleman was there, and that he was in some other station—My Compliments to him, if you please— It is...
July 24 We passed the Eveng at Mrs. Fishers where we met a small party consisting of Mrs. Harrisson, pretty Mrs. Morris, a Mr. Gardner just from Liverpool; Mr. Morris, Mr Gilpin, and Dr. Chapman—The eveng passed in social chat in the course of which I made some grand errors, about the Feudal system which I am very little acquainted with; but concerning which the young Gentleman with whom I...
July 26 It is this day four and twenty years since we came together, in which time much of bad and good has fallen to our lot: but take it all in all we have probably done as well as our Neighbours, and have been as much blessed as mortals usually are who cannot pretend to any extraordinary degree of perfection—I yet hope that many years are in store for you whatever may befal myself, and that...
July 27 I did not see the account you speak of in the Vermont paper, but your joke was not lost although it is un pen lest—.The young Ladies perhaps would have no objection as times go. Female modesty is certainly not the order of the day in this or any other Country, that I am acquainted with—We were invited to take Tea with Mrs. Fisher last Eveng. but my brother was so desponding we declined...
29 Rode out to Mr Sergeants about 2 miles and a half from Philadelphia on the Ridge Road. The Place is really beautiful leading down to the Skuyllkyll and laid out with a great deal of taste. It belonged to a Mr. Clifford whose plaything it was until last Summer, when he fell a Martyr to the prevailing fever at the the of age of seventy—and it now belongs to his Widow who in consequence of the...
July 31 Mrs. Powell, Mrs. Fisher, and Mr Saul from New Orleans, called on us, and I returned all my visits excepting the one to Mrs. Markov—My Brother is again better—Poor Mrs. Lee—We were told on our arrival that Dr Physick seldom ordered his patients into the Country if he could do any thing for them; and this circumstance has been a proof of his practice—I believe she remained but a few...