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This day has brought me an invitation in form to attend at the Capitol tomorrow to witness the ceremonies and I am told that I must go—I shall therefore attend and all the members of the family will attend with me— Mr. Wirt declines the uniting the two characters in the Oration on the plea of not having known your father personally and his Patrick Henry having proved a failure from the same...
I did not write you yesterday because I was so much fatigued I was obliged to lie down as soon as I returned from the Capitol—The services were tolerable in the manner peculiar to both the Gentlemen who officiated, and were a happy specimen of the tame and the bombastic—Mr. Port’s prayer was handsomely made for you; and I think the Doctor had a leaning to the Sage of Quincy, which appeared...
I yesterday sat down to answer your last Letter, and wrote two, neither of which I have sent, as the nature of my feelings were was such that their expression could not have been agreeable—Altho’ still under it unpleasant impressions, and knowing that neither my opinions or feelings will ought avail, I consider myself in duty bound to write, lest you should misinterpret my silence and deem it...
From the earnestness of my last Letter I am much afraid that you may think as is often the case with my friends that it proceeded from ill temper—It was most assuredly not with such a motive or in such a disposition that it was written It sprung from the feeling of anxiety which the extreme difficulty of your situation produced and under the idea that Mr Quincy had relinquished his charge...
Two or three weeks since an old friend of mine Capt. Jacob Sherburne of Orland, on the Penobscot River Maine wrote to me requesting my “influence with the President” to obtain for him the appointment of keeper of the light house now building on “Moos Peek head.” I enclosed his letter to you at Washington giving some account of him & his character It appears that you were then on your way to...
I was so much hurried when I wrote to you from New York that I am afraid you could scarcely read the scrawl—We left that City yesterday Morning and arrived here at about seven o clock last Evening—Mrs de Wint is much better than she has been and I find her looking very well— In consequence of Mr Kings having enclosed your Letters to me under cover to yourself at New York I have been much...
We have arrived safely here after a tolerably pleasant journey and a very pleasant visit at Borden Town although poor Mrs. Hopkinson was sick the greatest part of the time—I sent Charles on to secure me apartments and Mr Biddle accompanied me to this City in the Steam Boat from Washington—but our passage was boisterous and disagreeable— Charles King informed me last night that he had forwarded...
I have been so very sick the last day or two it has been impossible for me to write you I am still very much indisposed but intend to proceed to Albany this Evening in the Steam Boat I believe my illness is occasioned by the keeness of the air which has reproduced most of the symptoms of the last Summers complaint The weather is however much warmer to day and I hope I shall soon be better in...
No one has felt more deeply impress’d with the occasion which has drawn you to Quincy, than myself; but I have hesitated in assuring you of my sympathy, lest I should intrude upon your time which is now doubly occupied; and because I am sure you did not doubt my feelings upon that event. The late venerable tenant of your present mansion was the last surviving friend of my father’s youth; and...
I intended writing to you yesterday but was prevented by a feverish indisposition which I believe was occasioned by the Water—I am much better to day, and hasten to inform you of our movements with which you have not been able to keep pace because they have been so variable— At Mrs. de Wints I was constantly sick during my stay, and appeared to be growing worse every hour—I found afterwards it...
I have recd. a letter from a friend of Mr. Wint, in which he says “Mr. Wint had difficulty in consenting to pronounce a joint eulogy on Mr. A. & Mr. J.—because he knew Mr. J.—most intimately—was thoroughly acquainted with his person—manners, public & private—habits of action & study—acquirements as a scholar—tones & modes of thinking—and everything which constituted the individuality of the...
I meant to have addressed you, immediately after I heard of your arrival at Quincy, but my health & spirits have been so much affected by the painfull event, which has summond you to the house of mourning, that I have been unequal to it and even now I require greater consolations, than I am able to offer you—But alas? what is left me, it is only the hope that the mantle of my Dear and...
The will of my honoured & lamented Grandfather is received, & I beg you, most respectfully, to accept my thanks for transmitting me this mournful testimonial of his paternal affection. MHi : Adams Papers.
I had yesterday the honor of receiving the communication you did me that of addressing to me from Quincy dated the 14th inst. in relation to the last Will & Testament of my venerable, lately deceased, Grandfather. In offering to you the expression of a sincere grief at the bereavment we have had thus dispensed to us, by his death, I beg leave to tender you also the assurance of my conviction...
I send this enclosure and add a few lines to state that I shall leave this place on Wednesday for Washington and hope to find Letters from you in New York—We shall go by the way of Hudson and Poughkeepsy— Yours Ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I have recd. the letter of the 14th. August addressed to me by the Executors of the Will of my deceased Grand father; accompanied by a Copy of the Will. I can have no objections to make to the proceedings of the Executors—and request—my Uncle J Q Adams will act for me—upon any occasion on which it may be necessary— Very respectfully MHi : Adams Papers.
I send you the inclosed just as I have received it— I wish to be considered as taking no part in the matters of this kind. The obj respectfully / y hl O. MHi : Adams Papers.
Sales of Stocks, by Order of the Executors, on the Estate of John Adams late of Quincy decd. 13. Shares. Middlesex Canal @$260 3380 — 5 " West–Boston Bridge 295 1475 — 54 " Massts. fire & Marine Ins. Office par. 2700 — 1 perCt advce
I saw Col: Perkins, yesterday at Brookline, who did not seem prepared to answer my question, as to the intention of the Railway Company—From his general conversation I gathered that the Subject of the sale had been a matter of conversation with the Directors—He did not say that any determination had or had not been had—But we parted, he saying that he would see the Directors to day and would...
I have nothing to add to what I wrote you yesterday on that subject. I saw Col: Perkins, who said that the Directors could not determine until the sale and that this would depend upon circumstances .—By which, I understand—However you can conclude as well as myself.— I think, however, that one or other and possibly both pieces—are deemed important, and that they intend to purchase one or...
Whereas, John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk, Doctor of Laws, deceased, did by his last Will and Testament, order, that with certain exceptions, fully set forth in the said Will, all the rest and residue of his Estate, Real personal and mixed should be sold by his Executors. And whereas the said John Adams, did by his said last Will and Testament constitute and appoint his Son...
I take the liberty of proposing to you as a candidate for the office of District Judge for the Southern District become vacant by the death of Judge Van Ness. Saml. R. Betts one of the circuit Judges, in this State. Mr. Betts is well known, as a professional man, I am told to Mr Webster & Judge Storys in his politics he has always been of the party opposed to Mr. Clinton; on the Bench he is...
(Deed of the Quincy Wood lot.) Know all Men by these Presents, that we John Quincy Adams and Josiah Quincy, both of Boston in the County of Suffolk, Executors of the last Will and Testament of John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk, deceased, in consideration of the Sum of two-hundred and twenty-one dollars, and thirty three Cents, paid us by the said John Quincy Adams in his...
Whereas John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk, Doctor of Laws, deceased, did, by his last Will & Testament, order, that with certain exceptions fully set forth in the said Will, all the rest and residue of his estate, real, personal & mixed should be sold by his Executors. And whereas the said John Adams, did by his said last Will and Testament constitute and appoint his Son John...
(Copy.) Deed. Adams and Quincy to J. Q. Adams. Whereas John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Doctor of Laws, did by his last Will and Testament, give and devise to his Son John Quincy Adams and to his heirs all that part of his real estate lying on both sides of the Antient County road from Boston to Plymouth containing by estimation One hundred and three Acres be the same more or...
Know all men by these Present that I John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk Esquire am held and firmly bound in my individual capacity to the said John Quincy Adams and Josiah Quincy also of said Boston Esquire Executors of the last Will and Testament of John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Doctor of Laws deceased in the sum of Forty two thousand dollars; to the...
Mortgage, J Q Adams to Executors. Know all men by these Presents that I John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk Esquire in consideration of the sum of one dollar paid me by the said John Quincy Adams and Josiah Quincy Executors of the last Will and testament of John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Doctor of Laws the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge and for the...
Whereas John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Doctor of Laws, did by his last Will and testament, Give and devise to his Son John Quincy Adams and to his heirs all that part of his real estate, lying on both Sides of the Antient County road from Boston to Plymouth, containing by estimation One hundred and three Acres, be the same more or less, Together with his Mansion house,...
Dr The Executors of the last will of John Adams in To Balance of Account No 1 102 93 To sales of salt grass 6 00. " sale of Furniture 3175 59 $3284 52 Errors Excepted (signed) J. Q Adams (signed)—Josiah Quincy Executors acct with his Estate Cr —
Having received a very elegant Lace Cap from the Ladies of the Lace school at Newport I write to request that you will do what you think proper while there as to the expression of thanks and the real admiration which the extreme beauty of the work deserves—as it is really equal to the finest European Lace—We leave Boston tomorrow morning and expect to be at New York on Friday night— Give my...
On my arrival here this Morning, I received from Mr Aspinwall, Assignee of Robert Bird and Co. a dividend upon the debt proved by me, against their Goods and Estate, under the Commission of Bankruptcy, of that Company, which issued here in 1803. This dividend amounts to nine hundred and one dollars and ninety–five Cents—The debt was proved in my name; but the money belongs to the Estate of my...
We Alexander B Johnson and Abigail Louisa Smith Johnson his wife have received of John Quincy Adams and Josiah Quincy Executors of the last Will of John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, deceased, the sum of three thousand dollars, in payment of the devise bequeathed to me the said Abigail Louisa Smith Johnson by the said Will excepting my portion...
I enclose an order upon the Cashier of the U.S. Branch Bank Boston, for nine hundred and one dollars ninety–five Cents, to be passed to the credit of the Executors—being a sum received by me at New–York, from Mr Aspinwall, Assignee of Robert Bird and Co. When the Devises to Mr W. S. Smith, to Mrs De Wint, and to Mrs Johnson of Utica shall have been paid, I would propose that the sum remaining...
We John P De Wint and Caroline Amelia De Wint his wife, have received of John Quincy Adams and Josiah Quincy, Executors of the last Will of John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts deceased, the sum of three thousand dollars, in payment of the devise bequeathed to me the said Caroline Amelia De Wint by the said Will, excepting my portion of so much...
Voted, in compliance with a proposition made by President Adams, that the Supervisors of the Adams Temple and School Fund, be a Committee, authorised and empowered, in behalf of the Parish, to conclude with President Adams, an agreement in writing, by Indenture or otherwise, whereby at his expense, a Vault or Tomb may be constructed under the Stone Temple to be erected for the use of the...
Voted unanimously That the town in their corporate capacity acceed to the proposition made by President Adams through the Supervisors of the Adams Temple & School Fund. Voted That Hon Thomas Greenleaf, Hon Josiah Quincy, Hon Thomas Boylston Adams, Edward Miller Esqr. & George W Beale Esqr. Supervisors of the Adams Temple & School Fund, be fully authorised & impowered in behalf of the town, to...
Received of the Executors of the last Will of John Adams, by an order, on the Cashier of the United States Branch Bank, Boston, the sum of two thousand seven hundred and nine dollars eighty cents, being the amount of three Orders, from William S. Smith, one of the Devisees, named in the said last Will—of which orders, one for 1488 dollars three Cents is in my favour, for payment of dues due...
The enclosed letter from President Kirkland to me was received yesterday, though dated the 20th. A letter from the City of Washington might have reached me in nearly the same time. My reply to the President is enclosed for your perusal, and approbation if you think it entitled, and for your correction if you think it requires any. Having been present when the address was delivered, before the...
Pay to J. Q. Adams or Bearer Order, Two hundred and ninety Dolls. 20 cts. 290 Dolls. 20 cts. MHi : Adams Papers.
Received of the Executors of the Will of John Adams, the sum of two hundred and ninety dollars and 20 Cents, by a Check of the said Executors, on the Cashier of the U.S. Branch Bank here, being the amount of an Order of W. S. Smith, one of the Devisees, named in said Will, in favour of Benjamin L. Lear, Attorney to the Baron Hyde de Neuville, and by the said Lear endorsed payable to my Order....
I have the honor to subjoin a transcript of our account as exion closed by me at the United States Bank, on the 1st. Inst. conformably to the terms acceded to in your last letter. The balance, which I have drawn out as below by virtue of the authority above specified, I hold myself responsible to pay to the Executors, at three days notice, on demand, either in the whole, or in part, with...
The Copy of your Message to Congress transmitted under your Cover, having arrived during an absence at our University from which I am but just returned, a regretted delay has taken place in acknowledging the favor. I now offer my thanks for it, with an expression of the due sense I have of the increased interest given to the topics embraced in the Communication, by the eloquent and impressive...
I return my thanks for the copy of your Message to Congress on the 3d. instant. The very able view of blessings which distinguish our favored country is very gratifying: And the feelings inspired by our own condition find an expanded scope in the meliorations infused into that of all other people, by a progess of reason & truth, in the merit of which we may justly claim a share. With the...
Your favour of the 29th. Ult: accompanying the little packet for Mrs. Madison from Mr. Hughes, was duly recd., and she wishes you to be assured of her particular sensibility to your polite attention. The article in question did not, according to any suggestions of her memory, merit the friendly solicitude felt by Mr. Hughes: but the obligations to him are not the less on that account. As you...
Col Preston is desirous of exchanging the office he holds at Richmond for that lately vacated by the death of Doctr. Tu[cker] & it is his wish that I should be in the number of his friends who bear testimony to the public services & personal qualities on which his pretensions are grounded. Tho anxious to avoid such intrusions, I can not in justice to Col. P. withold the observat[ion] that his...
J. Madison with his respectful compliments to the President of the U. States, returns many thanks for the copy of his Message to Congress, politely forwarded by him. It could not be read without a lively sense of the interesting features it presents of the National prosperity; nor without recognizing the ability & eloquence of which previous occasions had furnished like examples. RC (MHi:...
I have recd. in your kind letter of the 21st. inst: the little pamphlet containing the "correspondence between yourself and several citizens of Massachusetts; with certain additional papers" The subjects, presented to view by the pamphlet, will doubtless not be overlooked in the history of our Country. The documents not previously published are of a very interesting cast. The letter of...
I have recd. your letter of the 1st. (post marked 7th.) instant, inclosing two letters from you to Mr. Bacon in 1808, one bearing date Novr. 17th. the other, Decr. 21. You ask the favor of me to compare these letters with the narrative in that of Mr. Jefferson [to Mr. Giles] of Decr. 25. 1825, and to let you know whether they were seen by me shortly after they were recd., with a further...
J. Madison presents his best respects to Mr. Adams, and thanks him for the Copy of his Oration on the 4th. of July. It is recommended to the public attention; not only by the characteristic ability & eloquence of the author; but by some of the views taken of its topics, which render it particularly interesting. RC (MHi : Adams Papers).
J. Madison, with his best respects to Mr. Adams, thanks him for the copy of his "Eulogy on the Life & Character of James Monroe" Not only must the friends of Mr Monroe be gratified by the just & happy tribute paid to his memory: The Historian also will be a debtor for the interesting materials and the eloquent samples of the use to be made of them, which will be found in its pages. RC (MHi :...