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I had the pleasure of your agreeable favour of the 31st. of August this day, and am much obliged by the Continuation of your Journal. You have refreshed my Memory encore. I acknowledge my Engagements, and think I have in part fulfilled them. You have I am persuaded recieved my first before this. The portions of your Journal are very short, but nevertheless choice and well written—was You to...
There is not a day nor an hour in which my Thoughts are not employed about you and your Family: But though my Wishes are for your return, I dare not advise you: because I cannot Satisfy myself what you ought to do. Indeed I See not how you can return. Through France or England, from Sweeden or Russia? The loss of your Child has deeply affected me. I Sympathize with you and my daughter under...
Since, I wrote you this morning, at the request of M r Randolph a thousand things occur to me to say to you, but as I have not time at present I shall write you from day to day. You will have a Collection to make of the Journals of Congress and the Laws of the Union; and all the Reports of our Ministers of State to take with you. You must remember all the Relations of the U. S. with all...
I hope your Anxiety, about your Prospects of future Life, will not be indulged too far. If, after your Term with M r Parsons expires your Judgment, Inclination and Advice of your Friends lead you to Boston, you shall have my full Consent and Approbation. If you could contrive to get a Small Family into my House with whom you could reputably board: and could reserve the best Room and Chamber,...
Inclosed I Send by your Sons, a little Information concerning the Fisheries. In tears for the loss of your Aunt Peabody; in too much Apprehension for tears at the Embarkation of your Sons which is to be next Sunday, and almost in tears of Indignation, at the Ignorance, and Insensibility of my dear New England, I Send you the inclosed Papers relative to the Fisheries. I will continue to collect...
I last night received yours of 21st. I have written twice to Mr. Thaxter and inclosed in each Letter, one for you and another for Charles. I directed the Letters to Mr. Thaxter a la Cour D’Hollande. Enquire for them at that House. You tell me you attended a Lecture on Medicine, but you have mistaken the Name of the Professor. It is not Horn, but Hahn. Is not the Professor of Law named Pestel?...
Your very instructive letter of 31st. August is the last I have recd. from you. Several to your Mother are missing. Your Reasoning and expostulations with New England are conclusive and unanswerable You advise me to read Massillon. Thank you. I advise you to read Carlostad and Scheffmacher. I have read Sixty Years and five more on the Subjects. Had I about me all the Books relative to it which...
Your Letter of 21 Aug. O.S. the first I have received, reached me only two or three days ago. I am pleased to see, your hand Writing improve, as well as your Judgment ripen, as you travel. But I am above all happy to find that your Behaviour has been such as to gain the Confidence of M r . D ana so far as to employ you in copying. This Employment requires a great degree of Patience and...
I hope, that before this day you are Safely arrived at New York, and that in another Month, I shall receive a Letter from you dated from that City. Before this reaches you I Suppose you will be at Boston or Cambridge, or Braintree or Haverill or Weymouth. Let me hear from you as often as you can. We have taken a House in Grosvenor Square, at the Corner of Duke Street, and hope to get into it...
I seem to be rambling with you, to the Hotell de Valois, the hotel du Roi &c &c but you have not yet visited Passy Chaillot, Auteuil, or Versailles, nor Mont Martyr nor Mount Calvaire. What has become of these Spots, where I have Taken so many anxious and Solitary Walks. Where is the Bois de Boulange? I envy you the Society of La Fayette and de Stael. The latter is more than her Father or...
As I have experienced Griefs as exquisite as yours I have the better right to advise you. I have no doubt you have delighted in the hope and prospect of educating a Daughter under your own Eye, that Should be a perfect Woman, a Daughter, a Sister, a Wife a Mother an Aunt a Grandmother, without Reproach or fault. But recollect your own Reflections upon Quintillian. Recollect This Vault of Air,...
Yesterday Noon Mr and Mrs. De Wint, arrived, in 48 hours from New York. They dined in that City on Monday and dined with me on Wednesday. Such is the facility and rapidity of Communication which Steam Boats Packetts and turnpikes have introduced. They presented to me the first of my great grandchildren that I have Seen of the four that have been given to me, one of whom has been taken away,...
The Senate have this Day unanimously advised and consented to the Appointment of John Quincy Adams to the Hague. If this Event should affect your Sensibility as much as it does mine, it will made a deep Impression upon Your Mind, both of the Importance of the Mission and of your obligation to Gratitude Fidelity and Exertion in the Discharge of the Duties of it. At two O Clock tomorrow Morning...
The Revnd. Mr Greenwood the successor of Mr Thatcher and Dr Kirkland in the Church in Summer Street Boston; will deliver you this letter—and altho he is a more liberal Christian than you are—I hope you will receive him with Politeness and Cordial Civility as I have no doubt you will— George came to us last night and brought me joy and Literature—John & Charles will be here to night or to...
You cannot imagine, the Anxiety I have felt on your Account, nor the Pleasure just received from your Letter of Feb. 1. I had heard nothing of you Since the Beginning of December when you was in Stockholm, and then only by the public Papers. When you arrive at the Hague, you may take your Choice, either to remain there and follow your Studies under the Direction of Mr. Dumas or go to Leyden to...
Captain James Riley politely Sent me his travels in a handsome volume which I read with interest, for, though it abounds in the Marvellous and sometimes aproaches the miraculous; yet excruciating Sufferings and a Strong imaginaleo may apologize for So much of it as to leave enough of it credible to make it an entertaining affecting and instructive Work Inclosed is a letter from him, on a...
Two ingenious Artificers, a Mr. Wheeler and a Mr. Wiley, under the Direction of a Committee, have been lately employed in making a Field Piece, a three Pounder, of bar iron. They have succeeded beyond Expectation. They have finished off a beautifull Piece of ordnance, which from all the Experiments hitherto made, promises great Things. The Weight of it, is two hundred and twenty six Pounds...
“Chain’d to his Throne, a Volume lies, With all the Fates of Men: With every Angels form and Size Drawn by th’ eternal Pen. His Providence unfolds the Book And makes his Counsells Shine; Each Opening leaf; and every Stroke Fulfills Some deep design. Here he exalts, neglected Worms To Sceptres and a Crown: Anon the following Page he turns And treads the Monark down. Nor Gabriel asks the Reason...
I am glad to learn, by your Favour of the 12th, that you have begun to translate Suetonius. This is a very proper book to teach you to love your Country and her Laws. Do you translate it into French or English? You Should always have a Book of Amusement, to read, along with your Severe Studies and laborious Exercises. I should not advise you to take these Books always from the shelf of Plays...
It gives me great Pleasure to find, that your Situation is agreable to you. An abler Instructor than Mr. Dumas is not to be found. Is not an 100 Verses at a Time too long a Lesson? Are you familiar enough with the Latin to comprehend So many Verses at once? You have Ainsworths Dictionary I presume. Let no Word escape you, without being understood. Drydens is a good translation, but it is not...
The Newspapers, throughout the Continent are announcing to Europe and America, Somewhat imprudently, that you are recalled and to be made Secretary of State. I know not whence this comes: but whether true or false, I hope it is true. And if it is true, I hope You will accept the Office of Secretary of State. If there is no Truth in it I hope you will demand your Recall and come home. And if...
This morning I had the Pleasure of your Letter of the 2 d of this month. The Town meeting did itself honour by its judicious Result. But there has not been the Same Wisdom in New York nor Philadelphia: nor is there equal Wisdom and Decision in either house of Congress. All that has been done has been to restrain and moderate the constant disposition to rashness Intemperance and Madness. M r...
Number. 1 A volume of written extracts Quarto 2 Letter Book beginning from 26th May 1776 to 8th February 1778 Folio 3 Ditto from 3rd Febry 1777 to 7th July 1777. Ditto... 4. Journals of voyage to France in 1778. " 5 Letter Book France from 12th: May 1778 to 8 Novr. 1779. " 6 Journal 13 Feby. 1778 to 26th. April 1779—
This Letter will be delivered you, by M r Roberdeau a Son of General Roberdeau my ancient Friend, lately married to Miss Blair a Daughter of Doctor Blair, whom your Mamma knows. I pray you to Shew all the Civility to M r Roberdeau in your Power. invite him to Quincy with you to keep sunday with your Mamma and shew him Boston and Cambridge, Colledge Library Apparatus &c and give him all the...
Sir Isaac Newton, supposes an Ether, to pervade the Universe. To the Action of this Subtile and elastic Fluid, he ascribes Gravitation, Cohesion, Repulsion &c. Hartley makes it the Instrument of propagating his Vibrations. What is the difference, between Newton, Hartley, Diderot and Grim? All this is mechanical Phylosophy. The Universe is a Chimical Experiment. Invented, performed and...
John Winthrop Esqr, Son of John Winthop of Boston Merchant and Legislator, Grandson of John Winthrop Professor and Counsellor, Great Grandson of Col Adam Winthrop of Boston Counsellor descended from the good old Governor, is destined to Bremen Where he expects to be Consul. He was educated at Cambridge and has travelled in Europe. He married Col Hitchburnes daughter who left him three...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mrss Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my Subscription for the National Intelligencer— I beg your pardon for not answering immediately your letter fo the 24th. of last Month as I ought—not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant family visit—& tendered me two...
In my Letter of the 14th Ult. I believe I misunderstood the Presidents Position. His Expression that the Judges ought to hang American Citizens who should commit homicide &c meant no more than to express his opinion that the Fact amounted to a Capital Offence. His opinion that it is a Capital offence to resist French Revenue Laws, in the West Indies is totally unfounded. The President was also...
I received last night your favour of the fourth, with the Letter inclosed Although I am not able to conjecture, in what manner it can possibly be of any consequence to any one, to prove that in the Year 1777 I argued a cause with Mr Lowell for Col Doane at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, before Judge Brackett, yet as Judge Bourne considers it material to him, I have no hesitation in certifying...
I have received your number 27. 15 October, 13. The large quarto Pamphlet entitled “Principes de Chronologie pour les temps anterieurs aux Olympiades,” by Count John Potocki I never received. It has miscarried. That the Count may have seen me, in London in France or Holland, is not improbable. I also have “plunged into the abyss of Antiquity” and have been “hunting for the books of the wars of...
De Pradt, I Suspect is a descendant of that Arcbishop Bishop of Clermont, the Bastard of Cardinal du Pratt, and the Oputent Protector of the infant Society of the Jesuits in 1545. See Duprat in the Dictionaire historique. The Archbishop of Matines I Suspect is of that Breed and worthy of his Race. See also The History of the Jesuits Vol. 1. Our national Sympathy with the Patriots of South...
With more joy than I can express I have recd your kind Letter of the 18th. of August. Your Mother has been Seized with a pulmonary Fever attended with very threatening Symptoms and a violent Cough which has confined her for some Weaks: but We have now the consolation of confident Assurences from Dr Holbrook that she is so much better as to be past all danger I can easily conceive of your...
I thank you for the documents you Send me, which I give to the Athenaeum believing they will do more good there than in my possession. I dare not write to you upon public Affairs, because I do not understand them. All that appears under your Signature is cooly approved as Usual, and will be, till fifty Years after you are dead and then it may possibly be admired by a fine Antequarians. Your...
Lieutenant John Percival of the Navy of The United States is about to embark for London, and from thence to the other maritime Powers of Europe upon business of importance to Navigation and consequently to Humanity. The Subject is a new Invention of an eliptical Valve Pump, which if I understood it, I must not explain. I earnestly recommend him to your Attention, as much as possible; though I...
In reading the Advertisement prefixed to De Lolme p. 6. I met a Passage which recalled to my Mind a Letter of yours concerning the Papers signed Columbus and the cold reception they met with among their Friends. “I shall add, says he, a few Observations, of a serious kind for the Sake of those Persons who, judging themselves to be possessed of Abilities find they are neglected by those having...
Yesterday I received your Letter of Jany. 1/12, and thank you for your account of the Place where you are. I will send you a Dictionary, as soon as I can, but it will be a long time before you can have it. I am very anxious for your Studies. Write me what Books You can procure there, and what others you want. I am much pleased with your Letter to Mr. Thaxter, but it is a Mortification to me to...
John Sergeant Esquire, a Director of the Bank of U. S. is appointed by that Board to negotiate for ten Millions of Spanish Dollars, offered by a commercial House in London This Gentleman, a Son of Jonathan Dickenson Serjeant Esq, once an intimate Friend of mine in Congress in times of difficulty and danger, requests an Introduction to you. I give it, with pleasure, both because I hear a good...
Mr Bray a Son in Law of Samuel Eliot Esquire, the putative Father of the Greek Professorship at H.C. will I hope have the honor to deliver this to you in the Bosom of all your Family. You probably know the political Connections of Mr Elliot and Mr Bray: but no considerations of this kind should interupt the Intercourse of Politeness hospitality and Civility. If my Eyes and hands could endure...
Inclosed is a Letter from Judah Alden of Duxbury, a fifty fifth Cousin of yours, on the Fisheries. And another from Freeman Atwood. I have not time to read these Papers but I believe you may depend upon them. I think I have Sent you proofs enough of the importance of the Fisheries to your Country. And my Advice is to demand your recall and refuse Your Signature to any compact which shall...
I am happy to have recd. your No. 30. No. 33. and No. 34. It is impossible to express the pleasure I have felt in reading these Letters, those to your Mother Sons and Brother, or the pain from the consciousness of my physical as well as Spiritual Inability to answer them as they deserve. Last night Mr T. Greenleaf Sent his Son, to read to me your Dispatches by Mr Dallas, ten thousand Copies of...
I received yours of 13 this morning. If you have not found a convenient Place to remove into, you may continue in your present Lodgings another Month. I am glad you have finished Phaedrus, and made Such Progress in Nepos, and in Greek. Amidst your Ardour for Greek and Latin I hope you will not forget your mother Tongue. Read Somewhat in the English Poets every day. You will find them elegant,...
I have this Morning received yours inclosing a Letter from the Duke de la Vauguion. Please to inform me in your next, when the Vacation begins. It is my Design that you shall come and spend a Part of the Vacation with me.—I approve very much of your taking the Delft Gazette the Writer of which is a great Master of his Language, and is besides a very good Friend to his Country and to yours. You...
The 11th. of September is reckoned among the happiest days of my Life. The Navy Officers who composed the late Court Martial on Capt. Little came out to visit me, with Mr Shaw who brought me your favor of the 4th dated at Philadelphia, informing me of your arrival on that day with my Daughter and Grandson in as good health as could be expected—You do not expressly say whether you intend to...
I received your Letter of 23d. March, and was very much pleased with it, because it is a pretty Composition and your Mamma Assures me it is your own. The History, you mention of Bamfylde Moore Carew, is worth your Reading altho he was a very wicked Man, because it serves to shew you, what a Variety there is in the Characters of Men, and what Odd, whimsical and extravagant Effects are produced...
Mr Temple Franklin Applied to day for a Passport as an American Citizen to go to France. He stated to me that he was born in London, had lived in the United States for about six years, but at different times—that he has not been in America for twenty years, & that he never was naturalized, but that he considered himself an American—It appears to me however that by the Laws of the United...
If you were in any spot between New Orleans and Passamaquoddy I should write you every day, if I could. But the communication now is so uncertain and so dangerous that I never write without fear of hurting you or the Public. You, almost from your Cradle, and I from 16 years of Age have been Heluones Librorum. We have hunted Books in Boston, in Bourdeaux in Paris in Nantes L’Orient and Brest;...
The inclosed Letter from the Sec. of State will go by the Way of England. In the paragraph quoted from me I wish you not to mistake. I dont mean that I have any aversion to a Treaty with Prussia or Sweeden, upon Terms consistent with your Instructions. You may agree to such a Treaty as soon as you please. But in the present State of Things, if the Neutral Powers will not go to War with France...
The Bearer of this Letter, Eliphalet Fitch Esqr., a Gentleman of large Fortune and high in office in Jamaica, is a Grandson of Dr. Boylston and consequently your Relation. You will wait upon him and his Lady, and do yourself the honor to shew them all the Attention and Respect in your Power, while they stay at the Hague. LbC in John Thaxter’s hand ( Adams Papers ). Eliphalet Fitch was receiver...
By Mr Gore in the Galen I received your favour of the 19th of June with the Seal: and yesterday from Washington your Letters in April with the Packetts of New Papers, these are all We have recd from you since the 21 of March. By the Gallen We had Letters from all your Sons and delightful indeed they were to Us. You must not let them be homesick nor be so yourself til you are all ready to...
Mr William Davis Robinson has been some weeks in London, and is about departing for the United States, his intelligence & zeal, but more than all, his sufferings, will I am sure always recommend him to the kindness and attention of our countrymen. I could not let him depart hence without giving him a line to testify in his favour those sentiments, I shall ever feel in exercise I hope, to those...