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I had the pleasure of your agreeable favour of the 31st. of August this day, and am much obliged by the Continuation of your Journal. You have refreshed my Memory encore. I acknowledge my Engagements, and think I have in part fulfilled them. You have I am persuaded recieved my first before this. The portions of your Journal are very short, but nevertheless choice and well written—was You to...
There is not a day nor an hour in which my Thoughts are not employed about you and your Family: But though my Wishes are for your return, I dare not advise you: because I cannot Satisfy myself what you ought to do. Indeed I See not how you can return. Through France or England, from Sweeden or Russia? The loss of your Child has deeply affected me. I Sympathize with you and my daughter under...
Since, I wrote you this morning, at the request of M r Randolph a thousand things occur to me to say to you, but as I have not time at present I shall write you from day to day. You will have a Collection to make of the Journals of Congress and the Laws of the Union; and all the Reports of our Ministers of State to take with you. You must remember all the Relations of the U. S. with all...
I hope your Anxiety, about your Prospects of future Life, will not be indulged too far. If, after your Term with M r Parsons expires your Judgment, Inclination and Advice of your Friends lead you to Boston, you shall have my full Consent and Approbation. If you could contrive to get a Small Family into my House with whom you could reputably board: and could reserve the best Room and Chamber,...
Inclosed I Send by your Sons, a little Information concerning the Fisheries. In tears for the loss of your Aunt Peabody; in too much Apprehension for tears at the Embarkation of your Sons which is to be next Sunday, and almost in tears of Indignation, at the Ignorance, and Insensibility of my dear New England, I Send you the inclosed Papers relative to the Fisheries. I will continue to collect...
I last night received yours of 21st. I have written twice to Mr. Thaxter and inclosed in each Letter, one for you and another for Charles. I directed the Letters to Mr. Thaxter a la Cour D’Hollande. Enquire for them at that House. You tell me you attended a Lecture on Medicine, but you have mistaken the Name of the Professor. It is not Horn, but Hahn. Is not the Professor of Law named Pestel?...
Your very instructive letter of 31st. August is the last I have recd. from you. Several to your Mother are missing. Your Reasoning and expostulations with New England are conclusive and unanswerable You advise me to read Massillon. Thank you. I advise you to read Carlostad and Scheffmacher. I have read Sixty Years and five more on the Subjects. Had I about me all the Books relative to it which...
Your Letter of 21 Aug. O.S. the first I have received, reached me only two or three days ago. I am pleased to see, your hand Writing improve, as well as your Judgment ripen, as you travel. But I am above all happy to find that your Behaviour has been such as to gain the Confidence of M r . D ana so far as to employ you in copying. This Employment requires a great degree of Patience and...
I hope, that before this day you are Safely arrived at New York, and that in another Month, I shall receive a Letter from you dated from that City. Before this reaches you I Suppose you will be at Boston or Cambridge, or Braintree or Haverill or Weymouth. Let me hear from you as often as you can. We have taken a House in Grosvenor Square, at the Corner of Duke Street, and hope to get into it...
I seem to be rambling with you, to the Hotell de Valois, the hotel du Roi &c &c but you have not yet visited Passy Chaillot, Auteuil, or Versailles, nor Mont Martyr nor Mount Calvaire. What has become of these Spots, where I have Taken so many anxious and Solitary Walks. Where is the Bois de Boulange? I envy you the Society of La Fayette and de Stael. The latter is more than her Father or...