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You must laugh at the information contain’d in my last as Mr. Harris tells me he wrote you by the same post that the resignation was accepted Mr. H.—as far as prevarication goes is certainly a good diplomat for he came to me very full of what I wrote you and told me he had it from the Gentleman himself. he was here last night with what he wrote you and at the same time stating that the...
Your very acceptable favors of the 17th: September & 22d: October came to hand within two days of each other about the middle of last month, and it would be difficult to express how much comfort they brought with them by the assurances they contained of the re-establishment of your own & your Louisa’s health. Since the receipt of this intelligence my Mother has got your favor of September...
Your Letter of April 27 was put into the Post office at New York and I have neither seen nor heard of M r Dorr nor M r Jones. It is probable they found a Conveyance for their Letters in the ship which carries our Envoy Extraordinary and their Journey to this Town became unnecessary. I should have been glad to have seen them and I suppose they might have obtained their Request without...
Your favor of the 14th Instant I recd last Evg. The Act you inclos’d is one of the most extraordinary that ever was taken up by a Legislature to authorize the P of US. to deny the rights of hospitality to any Ship of Warr upon the evidence most probably of a few drunken Sailors. it is the opinion of those to whom I have shewn it that it will soon tend to involve us in a Maritime Warr with...
Two vessels are notified, one for England, the other for Hamburgh. I will write by both, but the pleasure and freedom of communication, is much damp’d by the restraints of Station, and the apprehension of Capture. It is now several Months since I took my pen to address you. I believe my last date was in December. I have since written largly to Thomas, but fear my Letter is still waiting a...
Mr. John Douglass Simms of Virginia is the son of Colo. Charles Simms for many years collector of the port of Alexandria, and wishes to obtain employment under government. You are not unacquainted with the revolutionary services of his father, who was a very brave officer, & distinguished himself at the defence of the fort at mud island. He was the personal friend of Genl. Washington and a...
Your favour of the 29th. Ult: accompanying the little packet for Mrs. Madison from Mr. Hughes, was duly recd., and she wishes you to be assured of her particular sensibility to your polite attention. The article in question did not, according to any suggestions of her memory, merit the friendly solicitude felt by Mr. Hughes: but the obligations to him are not the less on that account. As you...
The Note from Piemont, I would not have Sued by any means. Hopkins’s Pretentions I have no Idea of. I Suppose an account with him may be found in my Ledger, But I can Say nothing upon memory. Piemont ought to make out his Account— He says I had a Bar Wig and a Bob Wig of him. If so he should make out his Account and if they amount to as much as the Note, there is an End of the Business. If...
Has there ever been an Instance, in the World, of two Persons living together without Emulation and Jealousy.? Is it possible there should be one? When I was finishing the Letter I wrote you on the 22d, the Ladies of the family without knowing what I was about read me, a passage in Hayleys Life of Cowper from p. 122. to p. 127. Vol. 1. Mrs Unwin was eclipsed by the Brilliancy of Lady Austen,...
I have rec d your favour of the 22 d I believe it is, and am glad to hear that the People of Boston are disposed to Stand firm on neutral Ground. Much will depend upon their Stability. There are so many Interests constantly contriving to draw Us off, from that Position, that if Boston should fail Us We should be in great danger. I feel for the Sufferers under the Unexampled depredations of the...
I have been much dissapointed in not receiving any Letters from your Father or you by the late arrivals from England. Capt. Lyde, and a Brig have come in very short passages, but not a single Letter. This is very painfull as well as unfortunate for me just at this period. I thought it not prudent to take passage for Europe untill I heard from your Pappa. If I had received letters I should have...
We live in dayly, hourly hopes of Letters from you at Paris. I wrote you by the Milo Capt Glover, and have written by the New Packett Captain Bronson, who is to carry your Sons under the care of Mr Samuel G. Perkins and his Lady. Two of our belle Esprits, the Greek Professor and Mr Ticknor, go in the Same Ship. The opportunity is favourable for our young Gentlemen, as far as We can judge. The...
For three weeks past there have been many & various reports in circulation respecting the Mediation to Russia & there has been much Said and written respecting the persons to be appointed. It was not untill yesterday that your Father & I was officially notified that mr Gallatin and Bayard were associated with you in a commission to Negotiate a Peace between Great Britain and the united States,...
I See by the paper that a cartel is to sail from Newyork for Gottenburgh. altho I have written to you frequently of late, by our ministers, mr Clay and Russel, and again by mr Tuckerman, who sails from Norfolk, yet I know it will give you pleasure to hear every day, that your parents, and your children are well. George and John, who are both attentive to their Studies, have lately past a few...
I have not acknowledged your 5. & 7 Octr. We have had another delightful Family Scene. Madam De Wint her Son your Nice with two of my Great Grand Children and to finish the Picture Mrs Clark all arrived in perfect health. On the 83d 25th Octr. We all drank “All our Friends and Connections of every generation”. “Now lettest thou, thy Servant depart in peace” has been So hackneyed that I will...
At the Request of Mr Quincy, I inclose to you, his Speech on the Admission of States into the Union which are Situated beyond the Limits of the 13 original Confederates. You will want none of my Comments upon it. Your Authority is quoted in it, in Support of its Principle. The Prophecies of Quincy’s imagination are not altogether chimerical; tho I hope the fulfillment of them is far, very far...
The Public Papers will inform you that M r Jefferson has resigned and that M r Randolph is appointed Secretary of State. The Attorney General is not yet nominated. M r Lewis M r Lawrence M r Benson M r Gore, M r Potts &c have been mentioned in Conversation. The Motives to M r Jeffersons Resignation are not assigned, and are left open to the Conjectures of a Speculating World. I also am a...
I inclose a Slip with an Essay in it, Signed Richlieu The Editor has poisoned it, with a Silly introduction; but that will not hurt it with you, ‘tho’ it Spoils it here. Who this Connecticut Gentleman is, I cannot conjecture. I did not believe, and cannot yet believe, that there is Brains enough, united with Courage and application enough, in that State to produce Such a paper. Trumbul?...
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of the 7th. Vol. of Wheaton’s Reports, the supplemental census of Alabama, and the commission of Tench Ringgold; as Marshall of the Dist. of Columbia, untill the end of the next session of the Senate. With great consideration / I have the honour to be / sir, yr. obed. servt, DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
your Brother returnd this Evening from Boston and gave me notice that a vessel would Sail for Sweeden tomorrow the notice is So Short, that I can only write you a Short Letter. I Shall in future follow your advice, have a Letter ready for the occasion and not wait for the opportunity. it was not however, untill last Saturday that I received a Letter from William Smith, that I was informed of...
There is an observation, which I wish you to make very early in Life because it may be usefull to you, when you grow up. It is this, that a Taste for Literature and a Turn for Business, united in the same Person, never fails to make a great Man. A Taste for Literature, includes the Love of Science and the fine Arts. A Turn for Business, comprehends Industry and Application as well as a faculty...
I can tell you nothing with Certainty when the Peace will be finished. I hope it will not be long. You may purchase a Suetonius, provided you intend to make a good Use of it. I long to See you, but can as yet form no Judgment when I shall have that Pleasure. We have no News from Congress, a Neglect which is to the last degree astonishing and inexplicable. Do you find any Society at the Hague?...
Your N. 48. April 8. arrived last night, and put our little family Circle into the best possible humour. The Gaiety of Spirit, the perfect good humour the delicate Satyre and the perfect Knowledge of Persons and Politicks, delighted and astonished Us all. If you had more of Juvenal and less of Horace; more of Swift and less of Adison, more Caustics and less Emolients, you would be the Terror...
Tis a very long time since I wrote to you, or heard from you I have been more engaged in company than is my choice but living in Town has necessarily devolved more of it upon us than heretofore, and tho we have not seen more than in reality we ought to considering our publick Character, yet it is much of an Egyptian task, and fall some times much heavier upon me than my state of health will...
I recieved your Kind favour of the 24th Yesterday morning never did a letter prove more welcome as I had suffer’d a great degree of anxiety at not hearing from you it is three weeks since the date of your last and I was very apprehensive your had been prevented from writing by indisposition I am wretched if you do not write me once a week at least to inform of your health—It is perhaps fancy...
In the first place, I must, in conformity with one of the rules ordained by you orators, endeavour to conciliate the affections of my reader, by quieting your Anxiety for your Children, which I can do with a good conscience by assuring you that George and John are in very good health and very fine Spirits. My Sheet would not hold the history of their Studies, their Sports and frolicks. In the...
General Forest has kindly given in the letter I inclose, his opinion on the doubt you suggest relative to the practicability of your joining in the execution of my Fathers Will. My ignorance of the testamentary laws of the State would not permit me to hazard the expression of any on this subject, & left me no other choice, than that of appealing for information to a friend, on whose experience...
It is my intention to return to you early next week unless my Dr. forbids; I will therefore beg you to send me some Cash to pay his bill although I fear you will think me very extravagant—. I am so surrounded by company, that I have not been able to continue my journal—Going this Even’ to Mrs. Hopkinson’s and to Mrs. Manego’s—Elopements appear to be the fashion among the medical tribe—Dr...
I have seen many of your poetical effusions, from the time when you were at College, to this last Month. And there are so many indisputible proofs of natural and Social affections, and genuine poetical imagery that if you will had cultivate the muses as much as you have politicks you might have made a Shakespear, a Milton or a Pope, for anything that I know, how “How sweet an Ovid, is in...
No one has felt more deeply impress’d with the occasion which has drawn you to Quincy, than myself; but I have hesitated in assuring you of my sympathy, lest I should intrude upon your time which is now doubly occupied; and because I am sure you did not doubt my feelings upon that event. The late venerable tenant of your present mansion was the last surviving friend of my father’s youth; and...
I inclose to you your Brothers Letter I should have Sent for you last saturday but I expected a snow storm. I suppose your Father has written to you. he is vex’d with the Printer for Publishing in three Numbers what ought all to have been in one. he says the writer of Columbus had better publish in a pamphlet by which a printer may get money, and as pamphlets are much in vogue at present....
29 Rode out to Mr Sergeants about 2 miles and a half from Philadelphia on the Ridge Road. The Place is really beautiful leading down to the Skuyllkyll and laid out with a great deal of taste. It belonged to a Mr. Clifford whose plaything it was until last Summer, when he fell a Martyr to the prevailing fever at the the of age of seventy—and it now belongs to his Widow who in consequence of the...
I have this morning received your favours of Jan. 7 and February the first with the Newspapers for which I thank you— I rec d some days ago a Letter with the Review and some other Papers. I thank you for all these Marks of your kind Attention. a few Lines from you are always acceptable as they are Information of your Health and Situation, but your long Letters are fraught with such Information...
I am charmed to find by your last letter that you pass your time so agreeably at Ghent: it would be almost a pity that the Congress should break up, as by all account you have derived so much benefit from your residence, and this Climate is so injurious, that the idea of your returning to sink again into the state of into inanity into which you had fallen, is so painful I could almost wish for...
Yesterday, was one, of the most joyful days of my life Harriet Welsh, like a winged mercury, came flying with your Letters received by Mail in the morning, from N york. under cover from Napolean Caroline de Wint, who knowing my anxiety, respecting you, and Mrs Adams. she seizd them in the moment they were deliverd, and forwarded them by Mail, with the pleasing intelligence that her mother, and...
Mr John Douglas Simms of Virginia is the son of Col Charles Simms for many years collector of the Port of Alexandria, and wishes to obtain employment under government. You are not unacquainted with the revolutionary Services of his father, who was a very brave officer & distinguished himself at the defence of the fort at Mud island. He was the personal friend of Genl. Washington and a uniform...
Plots & counterplots spring up like mushrooms in all directions, we shall hear enough of them, before the vista is enlightened ary a ray of hope—Madrid, Paris, Ireland & London, are the scenes of display at the present, of the turbid passions, which engender fears & dangers, for those who feel secure in their power & strength—This is a period, at the accession of a new King, & embarrassing...
Tomorrow week being the 1st. March I presume this must be the last letter I address to you at Washington supposing you will set off on your journey home the earliest opportunity after the Session closes— I yesterday recieved your favor of the 9th. and was rejoiced to find that you supported the extreme severity of the Cold with so much philosophy Poor Quincy, what would he have done here when...
Mr. Shaw brought me your letter last night of the 29 and you may be assured I will attend to the confidential injunction it contained— At the same time I will take the liberty of expressing my doubts as to the propriety of shrinking thus for ever from any manifestation of the publick feeling which it is natural to expect (and which with our Institutions which are altogether popular) it is...
I have the pleasure to acknowledg Your Letter of the 30th of June, brought by the Pilifix , Captain Welsh, after a passage of 95 days—being No 21—this compleats my list of Regular numbers, and yesterday I received your Letter of the 10 Sep’br by Captain Barker of the Leopard. No 24 there are two Missing originals, a press coppy of 23 came inclosed in No 24, but the Characters of the first page...
The Republicans have exerted their Energies, and propagated their lying Pamphlets so secretly, and with such effect as to make Federalists almost doubt their Empire in Massachusetts. They do not yet despair however: but their majority will not be so great as they expected. The Defection of the County of Essex is greater than was foreseen. The Causes of this are many, more than I know perhaps....
Th: Jefferson requests the favour of Mr. Adams to dine with him on tuesday Nov: the 3rd. at half after three, or at whatever later hour the house may rise. The favour of an answer is asked. MHi : Adams Papers.
I last night recieved your letters of the 10 and 13 together and the extreme satisfaction of learning that your long silence was not caused by any new misfortune and that your health and that of our dear children was good. Your mother and, Sister Smith both wrote me last week who writes in better spirits than I expected. I am not surprizedat any thing Yrujo does. He has every reason to think...
I wrote to you by Captain Scott Some time in December. on the 14 of the Month Captain Joy arrived in Boston, after a passage of 63 days. by him we learnt the agreable News of the arrival of the Alfred, in a passage of 32 days. to know that the ship was arrived, was a relief to my mind. to have heard from my dear sons, would have been a cordial to my Heart, but the Gen ll Lincoln was comeing...
I make it a rule to begin my Letters by an acknowledgment of those which I have received from you, when any such there are. I have now the pleasure to notice yours of june the 6th No 89—I do this for two reasons—1st because every correspondent likes to know, that their Letters, are received, and 2ly that they are worthy notice, and there is not any Subject, apparently trivial in itself, but...
Last Night, my Dear Son, I received your kind Letter of the 3d of the Month and hold myself under great Obligations for so much information of various kinds at once. It is my determination to be a better correspondent than I was last Winter. I never explored that route through New Castle and Frenchtown but am very glad you have found it, because I believe it will Save you many an unpleasant...
Your Letter is this moment brought me my dear John and I confess I was very much disappointed in not seeing you in propria personea as my last epistle was to be considered positive if your father did not go soon to Boston—I trust however that the one I last sent will induce you to start immediately— I had written thus far when it occurred to me that John would probably have left Washington...
Yours of 22d ulto. arrived a few days agone. I acknowledge myself much in Arrears, tho’ I have by no means forgotten you. For three Months past I have been miserably tormented with the Tertian Ague, and have been a more useless being than common. However I hope the Game is nearly up at present. I had no Idea that your Climate was so bad—but you must remember that this has been an uncommon...
I am informed of a Vessell to sail for England soon and I have been too remiss already not to embrace this opportunity of writing to you— I had the pleasure to hear from you soon after your arrival— but since that time I have been indebted to our Parrents and Charles for information respecting you— but I am so conscious of my own deficiencies that I cannot complain of yours— nevertheless I...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...