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though I owe you many Apologies for neglecting to write for so long a time, it would give you no pleasure to read them. The Misfortunes afflictions and griefs in our Family in 1811 were sufficiently pungent, and to repeat them would be to renew them. I feel too much for you, your Consort and your Sister, as well as for Mr Smith to wish to renew the Sorrows which you must have felt at the first...
August 17 Mr. Cook called to inform me he intended to return to Washington tomorrow; and while he was sitting with me the Doctor again went through the operation on my brother again which was as in the former case attended with complete success. For two hours after he suffered great anguish, but I gave him a small dose of laudanum which soothed the irritation of his nerves; and he was much...
I received by your Brother on fryday last your kind Letter; he did not get here, oweing to contrary winds untill the tenth. he appears to think of the Law, but I fear it is rather from necessity than inclination, and because he finds that his Father is fond of having him study it, and that he does not See any opening in any other buisness. I shall be better able to judge when your Father...
I must abide by the rule I have establishd, which is not to let any opportunity of writing to you, pass unimproved.—altho I have no later letters from you, to acknowledge than, that, from Paris of the 19th March. Since the receit of which, I believe I have written you half a dozen. I have little more to say now, than that we are all well, anxiously longing for Letters from you, and for...
I received two days ago your favor of the 15th. with the written and printed accompaniments. I am glad to find that your personal interviews with Mr. Bentham, afforded an entertainment which may have been some recompence for the trouble which I contributed to give you in relation to him. The celebrity which this philosophic Polititian has acquired abroad as well as at home do not permit one to...
I have requested a number of Friends, to Search and Seek for information concerning the Fisheries, and they have procured me many Letters which I have Sent you. I ought to have recorded in a Book every One of those Testimonies: but you know the impossibility of it, as I have no Clerk. Some of those documents I have been obliged to Send away to you, without reading them. Inclosed is one from...
this morning my Dear Brother—M r Storer Came out from New York—to spend the day with us and was the Bearer from thence of your kind letter dated Sep tr 11 th from Braintree, I am very much surprized that you had not at that time received a letter from me, I wrote you in August and M r Dane took my letter to Frank—and I had expected that you had received it long ere this,— Several of my...
I last week received your Letter of december 3d in replie to mine of Novbr 11th, not having made any mention of it before I thought it had miscarried. I am very sorry to learn by it, that you have been unwell. you must not let the mind wear so much upon the Body. Your disposition to a Sedentary Life prevents you from taking that regular excercise which the Body requires to keep it in a healthy...
Mr Gurney having called on me yesterday, to give notice that he should quit your house next quarter day, and that he wished to settle with you as soon as possible, I have thought it best to write you my beloved friend, he having expressed a desire to leave it immediately, which I did not think you would approved; he mention’d not having it in his power to pay you at present, but will give you...
At the request of our worthy friend and excellent Neighbour Dr Amos Holbrook; I transmit you the inclosed papers, praying you to convey them to the Superintendent of the Patent Office, If I knew Dr Thornton was there I would have transmitted them to him. But I think I have heard some other Gentleman was there, and that he was in some other station—My Compliments to him, if you please— It is...
Received of the Executors of the last Will of John Adams, by an order, on the Cashier of the United States Branch Bank, Boston, the sum of two thousand seven hundred and nine dollars eighty cents, being the amount of three Orders, from William S. Smith, one of the Devisees, named in the said last Will—of which orders, one for 1488 dollars three Cents is in my favour, for payment of dues due...
I had left off writing entirely from the idea that you would have left England Ghent befor a Letter of mine could reach but from all the accounts which we here recieve I find that it is possible you may remain at Ghent half the Winter therefore I have resolved to write again and trust to chance for the return of my Letters in case you should be on your way— I have moved into Town and made...
I have time only to write you a line or two, not expecting captain Bigolow to Sail so Soon. I was yesterday informd that he would not go till the middle of the week, but this morning he has sent for the Letters. I thought your sister had letters, but she says they are not ready. She wrote you by mr Jenks 3 weeks ago. I must refer you to your Friend Storer for further information as I have...
Contrary to my established habit for many years I must now become an intercessor for a candidate. You must remember a virtuous & industrious lady old lady the widow Owen who lived to be 90 odd years of age, and maintained an always an excellent character and was highly esteemed by your mother. You must remember also young Hollis her grandson who lived some time in our family and was the...
I received the letter you did me the honor to write me, on the 7th. of this month. Inclosing a copy of an additional return of the Census of Alabama in virtue of an act of Congress of the 7. of March 1822 / and salute you with the respect and affection / of your obid: & very humble Servant MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
It grieves me to think how long it is since I have written you a Line. But public Affairs are forbidden and private are indifferent or disagreable. Your Sister and youngest Brother have given me much Pleasure this Winter by their Company: but at the same time have exalted a Strong desire to see you and your best Friend my amiable Daughter, your Wife. A Being who has violated a Trust committed...
I was very happy to recieve your Letter of the 12 August, which I have been waiting for with much impatience. I am sorry my writing was not good, but I hope in time I shall learn to write, with as much ease and elegance as Brother George; I will take more pains for the future. You ask me what I mean by a colour? it is a small piece of red paint used in painting Pictures. The rose-bud which you...
I have not written a line to you for a long time; yet scarcly an hour of the day passes in which you are not present to my mind; I fear my last Letters were captured the ship, captain scott, was taken by the French. you will think me more tardy than I have really been. by the date of this you will see where I am. it was not my intention to have come here untill the Fall of the Year. I expected...
A Gentleman, whose Name is Reynolds a Native of Boston, a Graduate at Cambridge, a Pupil in Medicine and Surgery of the late Dr Warren, a Son of a respectable Merchant, a good Scholar and an amiable Character, requests as all other young Travellers do, Letters to You. He goes, I Suppose to See the Hospitals in England Scotland France &c. I have nothing in particular to Say, but that Yesterday...
(Copy.) Deed. Adams and Quincy to J. Q. Adams. Whereas John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Doctor of Laws, did by his last Will and Testament, give and devise to his Son John Quincy Adams and to his heirs all that part of his real estate lying on both sides of the Antient County road from Boston to Plymouth containing by estimation One hundred and three Acres be the same more or...
Whereas John Adams late of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Doctor of Laws, did by his last Will and testament, Give and devise to his Son John Quincy Adams and to his heirs all that part of his real estate, lying on both Sides of the Antient County road from Boston to Plymouth, containing by estimation One hundred and three Acres, be the same more or less, Together with his Mansion house,...
Sunday last brought to hand your invaluable letter of the 6 th shall I confess I was nearly too much elated to know what I read having vainly flattered myself from the intelligence I previously received of your immediate return but alas how delusive is hope how was I disappointed to find you might not return till the Spring. You ask my permission to come here Oh my best friend you already know...
Welcome, welcome, my dear Son to your native Land after a seven years absence from it. God be praised that you and Louissa, and my dear John George &c have arrived in Safety, but I have trembled for you, least the extreem Heat you must have experienced Since your arrival should be too much for you all. The Sudden change we have experienced of no less than 30 degrees, is equally trying to weak...
Nature did not make me of a jealous disposition; but a dismal experience has made me Suspicious of myself, not less than of others. I often Suspect myself, and that my Imagination deceives me; that I mistake posibilities for probabilities and Non Entities for probabilities; that I See “ Au dessous des cartes ” many things which in reality may not be there. Masons and Austins are Old South...
Prince will bring this to you; the inclosed Letters I wish you to direct, the thin Paper, to your Father The other to Thomas; Prince is to return on thursday morg̃ by him send the papers and any Letters which you may have; if the weather should prove pleasent, I shall send a Horse for you on saturday. I have seen the dr since I wrote to you, and talkd with him about the meddow. he thinks that...
When Sunday comes I usually enquire whether I have any arrearges to make up with my correspondents; if I have, it is to me the most convenient season for discharging such debts. Though I have, at present, no letter unacknowledged, I have a variety of documents and journals from you, which deserve mention, because they serve as a substitute in some degree for letters, which we know you have not...
I am under obligations to you my dear son, for keeping up so regularly, and so constantly your correspondence with me; notwithstanding your various publick employments and private engagements, and I consider myself as very fortunate in receiving your Letters, tho frequently of an old date, owing to the circuitous route they have to make. By mr Fisher of this city I received a few Days Since...
It would be ridiculous in me to write you, upon public Affairs. If We have Judges as at the first; We certainly have not Counsellors or Warriors as at the beginning, except by Water. On the Ocean and on the Lakes We have no reason to blush. You have Sent a Pamphlet upon the Analogy between Russian Words and Sanscret Words. Our University and our Accademy See no importance in this Pamphlet. I...
Mr. Richard of Michigan has the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the polite invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Adams. He regrets very much that the condition of his health does not permit him to accept the homor of the Invitation. The Delegate of Mich. takes this Oportunity to offer Mr. Adams his congratulations for his Success at the late Presidential Election. he assures him that this happy Event...
I have this moment recieved your kind letter my best friend it has removed a load of anxiety from my heart which was becoming almost insupportable I wrote you yesterday that I was well to day I am even better as my mind is at ease your letter laid two days in the Cambridge post office which accounts for the unusual delay— The Death of Col. Wythe was attended with the most horrid circumstances...