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This is the last Day of the year 1809, and almost 4 Months Since you left us. we have been fortunate in hearing from you and of you, through this long voyage. From the banks of Newfoundland we received your Letters by the Dove. the beginning of August, we heard again of you on the 26th. and upon the Evening previous to our thanksgiving. whilst my harp was hung upon the willow, reflecting upon...
Coll. Bradford came out to day with a card of invitation from the Govenour, and an other from the Govr and Senate requesting your Father to celebrate the fourth of july with them, he has accepted the invitation. if you receive an invitation, both your Father and I advise you to accept it. if you do not, I shall depend upon the pleasure of seeing you at Quincy with Mrs Adams Kitty & the...
I fear your Father may have given you unnecessary anxiety; I told him at the time it was not best to mention an indisposition so slight as John’s was, but he said if he wrote; he must tell all. I had observed for several days about noon a high coulour in his cheeks, and at that time, he was unusually irritable, Some other Symptoms indicated a redundancy of Bile, which proved to be the case....
I wrote to you about a week since by the British packet, but a vessel going for Hamburgh gives me a fresh opportunity of addressing you. I have requested your Brother to make a collection of papers and pamphlets for you, which he has done. I am very solicitious to hear from you. I know not that I have ever been so long a time without Letters from you. Your last to me was the 3d of July—I know...
I have just closed one Letter to you which is to go to Lisbon from thence to the care of mr Beasley. this is to go to France. upon the 30 of August I wrote you a melancholy Letter nor will this be less So. it is allotted to me to be the maven who is to convey to you all the Calamities which afflict our family and they have rooled in wave after wave, the Death of your Dear and only Sister who...
We have had in the Week past the coldest Weather that has been through the winter, yet we have not had Snow enough through the Season to cover the ground. I expet Febry and March will pour upon us the whole quantity which the cold must have engenderd through the Winter. The Season has been very healthy. few cold’s or coughs. George after spending a fortnight with me and getting quite rid of...
Received Quincy July 27th 1809 of John Q Adams Esqr the sum of fifty-three Dollars and twelve Cents, in full for interest on $1700 from the 18th: January to the 7th August 1809. $53.12 MHi : Adams Papers.
It was with inexpresible pleasure that I yesterday read a Letter to your Father from you dated the 18th of Feb’ry, This is the first line which has reachd us from you; since the return of your Brother; I have not any from you of a later date than Sep’br. By the last No. 7 or Eight of your Letters must be missing, one public Letter of december was received from you, by the Secretary of State;...
I have to acknowledge your favours of 23 April No. 86 of the 15 May No 87, and yesterday by mr Bond your Letter of May 20th No 88, and the Review and news paper The Reviews you will charge, as your Father requests, with the other Books which you Send him I inclose to you a Strip of a newspaper which contains some account of our National Jubilee, an event of more consequence to America, than...
I received a Letter yesterday from mrs Johnson, informing me that Capt Bandrige, in the frigate President, was to Sail with dispatches to St Petersburgh. I embrace the opportunity, tho not more than ten days since I wrote you largely, by a vessel bound to Gottenburgh. Mr Smith a Brother of Mrs Charles Millar took charge of the Letters. Yet to learn that We are all alive and Well, by whatever...
I was much pleased at receiving your Letter of March 14th. It was a much longer interval than had occured before, without receiving a line from you. but Mrs Quincys kindness in always mentioning you to my sister had relieved me from the fears that you might be sick. it is with Sincere Satisfaction that I learn from your own hand that your Health is much mended. When a Man enjoys good Health,...
The inclosed Letter I received a few days Since to forward by the first opportunity. my last Letter was addrest to Mrs Adams, and went by a vessel direct for St Petersburgh belonging to Loring & Curtis, which Saild in April. This will inform you that your sons are both well. your Father and myself as well as old Age can expect to be. neither of us Deaf dumb or blind as yet, trembling and...
You have been so good in writing to your Father and Brother that I ought not to complain that you have not particularly addrest a Letter to me, tho I wanted to know how George was grown, and whether he rememberd you and what he had to say to you. John I think you told me was quite different in his temper and disposition, more sturdy and harder to manage. these are subjects much more...
I was never more at a loss what to say to you than at the present moment, to accuse you of neglect I cannot, I will not, for I do not believe it possible—yet so unfortunate have I been, that not a line has reachd me from you of a later date than the first of last May, two packets have since been received containing Letters for your Father your Brothers & your children, but not a solatary line...
I would not come to Town to day because I knew I should only add to yours, and my own agony, my Heart is with you, my prayers and blessing attend you, the dear Children you have left, will be dearer to me for the absence of their parents, and my care whilst, Providence continues to me my faculties, and my Life. If your Father and I Should be removed, they cannot fail of finding Friends and...
Last Evening I received your Letter of Sepbr—4th No 42—Accept my thanks. it grieved me to think how anxious you must feel before an other Letter from my hand would reach you. I was rejoiced to Learn that Thomas Welch was safely arrived at Hamburgh. I hope you will find in him a true American, but as you observe your Brothers place cannot be supplied to you. I am anxious least he should make a...
I have already written to you twice by this opportunity. I had not intended to have taken my pen the third time, but having received intelligence from Washington which I wish’d might be communicated to mrs Adams, and her Sister with that prudence and tenderness which so distressing an event calls for I thought it best to communicate to you the Sudden death of Mrs Hellen, who was at Church on...
Your Letters are always Common property with the Family to hear from you, and know that you are all well, is a mutual gratification to us all—Your Father is not so punctual in acknowledging Letters, dates and numbers as you are, so that your last Letter to him of Janry 14th No 56 is left for me to notice, and laugh, at your excuse for its brevity. I have received several from you of the like...
I am indebted to you for two Letters Since I wrote to you. Your Letter of december 22d. I thank you for, as well as the other; to me your conduct wanted not any justification or explanation. I am fully Satisfied that you have weighed every measure, looking much further into concequences than those who censure and condemn. Yet I like to have some reasons to give to those who feel anxious upon...
I learn that the vessel in which our ministers are to embark, will not go untill thursday. I will write you a few more lines, in hopes they may be in Time, and that for the pleasure I know it will give you, to learn, that your Father and I have So far recoverd from our late sickness, as to ride the last week to weymouth, to visit our old Friend Dr Tufts, who in his 82d year, still enjoys So...
Since my Letter to you of the 23 of August I have only written one Letter! it was to Abbe Shaw congratulating her upon her marriage, which took place upon the 18th of this month, to which I was invited, but many Circumstances prevented my attendance. She is gone with her Husband to reside in Salem. She has the prospect of being happily married. She is a good and amiable girl, possessing many...
The Saturday after you left Boston, I went to Town, and brought up George. he went the next week to his uncle Cranch’s, and goes daily to school to mr Whitney. he appears well pleased, and learns to the Satisfaction of mr Whitney as I hear, who has put him into Lattin, which George Says is not so hard as French, in his French Bible his Aunt hears him daily. he is a Good Boy, save now and then,...
The Prussian Consul General has just calld upon me to inform me, that he Shall proceed to Nyork on Monday, and from thence embark for England on his Way to Berlin. He has politely offerd to be the bearer of any packet I may wish to convey to you. I embrace the opportunity of Sending you Some News papers and pamphlets, a number of which are orations, upon the Character of the late General...
I address you jointly and congratulate you upon the fine weather we have had since you commenced your journey I hope e’er this day, you have reached washington in safety , with your dear little Boy; for whose Safety, I was not a little anxious through so long and fatigueing a journey. We had the pleasure to receive a Letter from you, informing us of your arrival at New york— The week after you...
The intercourse between us is daily more and more obstructed, it may prolong your tranquility that it is so: I know not how to take up my pen, yet painfull as the Duty is, I must perform it, untill the task may devolve upon some other, to tell you that your Parents are also numberd with the dead. I wrote you in Sep’br, an account of my dear Sister Cranchs Sickness, and of the little prospect I...
Dr Eustice, for so he will be call’d altho now our minister to Holland, came yesterday to make us a visit, and to take leave, previous to his leaving America—he goes out in the Frigate Congress. he requested me to write by him. I replied, that I had written so frequently of late, that I had not any thing to add. he thought a Lady could never be at a loss. I should not neither, if I had...
The john Adams arrived last week at Nyork, with mr dallas and brought me your Letters, which have been missing, viz No 57. March 30th No 58 April 28th; No 59 May 12th and August 15th. No 62—I have before acknowledged No 60, June 30th, and upon the 21 of Sepbr 1814 I received your No 50, just the day year, upon which it was written. My numbers are now nearly compleat, your Letters are all...
Captain Tracy is to Sail on Sunday in the Galen. our young Gentlemen are all flying abroad. Some upon buisness. Some from curiosity. those of the most respectable standing apply for Letters of introduction to you—Your Father has given Letters to mr Prescott, who goes first to the Brazills. he has also written to you, and the children by mr John Gray, who is a passenger in the Galen. An other...
Mr Benjamin Beal jun’r Who has long resided in France, returnd last Winter upon a visit to his Family here as he connected himself in France, his stay here has been Short, and he is now going back in a to Liverpool, and from thence to France I request him to take this Letter for you, which I shall place under-cover to Mr Barlow our Minister in France that he may forward it to you by the first...
Mr Edward Brooks, Eldest son of mr P C Brooks has visited us, and offerd to take Letters for us to you. his parents you know, and this young Gentleman is worthy of such parents he is said by those best acquainted with him to be a solid Sensible and correct Character—Such as will do no dishonour to our Native State, or Country. any civility in your power to show him, will be gratefully received...