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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy"
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August 7 After closing my journal I received your very affectionate Letter N 11 containing another order on the Bank. I cannot express the feelings of gratitude which swell my heart with unutterable thankfulness for your kindness to my Brother; who went through a slight operation without any great appearance of suffering—The worst part of the business is that it must be repeated four or five...
August 6th. It is very cold here to day so much so that we can sit comfortably with the windows shut—My Brother suffers very much from this change his nails are quite blue— Miss Hamilton and Mrs. Fisher called on us this morning—Mr. Harrisson is still very sick and I think Mrs F. appears to have some fears concerning his recovery, which from all I can gather, will be very doubtful—I really was...
August 4 Your N. 10 was brought me this morning containing the order upon the Bank for which I thank you—I am more uneasy than I can express at the part of your Letter concerning Kitty and cannot possibly guess what it can mean—Surely there are persons in the world so singularly constructed that their minds are utterly incapable of improvement from experience which generally teaches the most...
August 3 After despatching my Letters we received Georges N. 10 with one from Mrs. Porter in London in which she is desirous that you should dispose of 20 copies of some work written by her father which she has just published, the first Vol of which she has sent to Mr. Gracie with an order to send them to you, and she has fixed the price in England at half a pou 18S. 6d a Vol. The poor old...
August 2 We last night paid our intended visit to the Masonic Hall and were received by the Grand Master with great politeness—We found the gas lights burning which I am informed was a special favour—The Grand Lodge is very handsome, the decorations showy and the Seat of the Grand Master placed on a sort of throne supported by pillowsand an arched dome—Having had the honour of being seated in...
July 31 Mrs. Powell, Mrs. Fisher, and Mr Saul from New Orleans, called on us, and I returned all my visits excepting the one to Mrs. Markov—My Brother is again better—Poor Mrs. Lee—We were told on our arrival that Dr Physick seldom ordered his patients into the Country if he could do any thing for them; and this circumstance has been a proof of his practice—I believe she remained but a few...
29 Rode out to Mr Sergeants about 2 miles and a half from Philadelphia on the Ridge Road. The Place is really beautiful leading down to the Skuyllkyll and laid out with a great deal of taste. It belonged to a Mr. Clifford whose plaything it was until last Summer, when he fell a Martyr to the prevailing fever at the the of age of seventy—and it now belongs to his Widow who in consequence of the...
July 27 I did not see the account you speak of in the Vermont paper, but your joke was not lost although it is un pen lest—.The young Ladies perhaps would have no objection as times go. Female modesty is certainly not the order of the day in this or any other Country, that I am acquainted with—We were invited to take Tea with Mrs. Fisher last Eveng. but my brother was so desponding we declined...
July 26 It is this day four and twenty years since we came together, in which time much of bad and good has fallen to our lot: but take it all in all we have probably done as well as our Neighbours, and have been as much blessed as mortals usually are who cannot pretend to any extraordinary degree of perfection—I yet hope that many years are in store for you whatever may befal myself, and that...
If a Sense of duty did not compell me to address You with these few lines, I could not deem it proper to intrude on your more Serious occupations—but—where, perhaps, it might afford you an opportunity of doing good—even in attending to the duties of your High office, I trust, I Shall not need an excuse for this interference by the Secretary of State—while I am too well informed of John Quincy...