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Contrary to my established habit for many years I must now become an intercessor for a candidate. You must remember a virtuous & industrious lady old lady the widow Owen who lived to be 90 odd years of age, and maintained an always an excellent character and was highly esteemed by your mother. You must remember also young Hollis her grandson who lived some time in our family and was the...
Mr Webster regrets that a previous engagement deprives him of the pleasure of accepting Mr & Mrs Adam’s invitation to dine on Thursday. MHi : Adams Papers.
Finding your orchards had faild, I sent to Princeton and directed my Foreman to pick out Six Casks of the best Cyder the farm had produced this year (not haveing any of the preceeding year that I consider’d worth transporting) and have them carefully drawn off into other Barrells, which has been done, and I received them here, this morning about 2 oclock, fearing a return of severe frost, I...
The Inclosed extract from a Letter I lately rec’d from my friend, Dr Nicholas, wch. I read to my dearly beloved friend yr. father soon after it came to my hand—he was so much pleased with it that he requested me to send you a Copy; And as his wishes are to me , the delights of obedience, I have promptly given it; presuming however that Dr N wd not wish it should be made public as comeing from...
Mr Sergeant sent me your Letter yesterday morning and I thank you for the pleasant information it contained concerning the health of all at home—I wish I could give you the same assurance concerning my little party but the Coachman is still very ill and Elizabeth is also quite unwell. George is on the whole better but occasionally much indisposed and subject to faintness—Mary and I do better...
The Enterprize has just arrived and brought all the stray baggage which will be delivered to us tomorrow morning—A Gentleman has just called to announce to us this very acceptable inform news who says he made every exertion to expedite its return—Of the Coachman and Elizabeth we have heard nothing but are in hopes they will be here tomorrow night and should they arrive I propose to leave New...
The Citizens of Princeton, having been informed of your intended visit to that place, embrace this opportunity of manifesting their respect for your person and Character and their gratitude for your distinguished Services in the responsible stations to which you have been called, by meeting you on this occasion to express to you the assurance of a cordial welcome— We rejoice in this...
This Indenture made this twentieth day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty one, Between John P. Van Ness and Marcia Van Ness, his wife, both of the City of Washington, of the one part, and John Quincy Adams Esquire, of Boston, in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, now abiding in the said City of Washington, of the other part,...
The style in which my Letter of the 3d was written, pretty clearly evinced by its apologetic nature, the fear I felt of giving offence; and your answer has proved those fears were not unfounded: Surely I have never doubted the or disputed the all distinguished attentions you have received from your Countrymen, and still less ever suggested the idea that you courted them—You must permit me to...
This will probably be the last time I shall write you as your journey will commence soon after the receipt of this Letter. My present object is to mention a plan which has occurred to me concerning your father who is very desirous of going to Commencement but who is evidently too weak to support the fatigue of the day without something is done to make it easy. My plan is to engage two chambers...
Your Letter was brought to my chamber door and thrown in by your father this morning before I was up he having heard me express some anxiety to hear from you yesterday morning was so good as to give it me as soon as it arrived—I am delighted to learn that you adhere to your resolution of leaving Washington on the 20th. and shall be careful to have a conveyance for you to Quincy from Dedham—The...
Mr. Shaw brought me your letter last night of the 29 and you may be assured I will attend to the confidential injunction it contained— At the same time I will take the liberty of expressing my doubts as to the propriety of shrinking thus for ever from any manifestation of the publick feeling which it is natural to expect (and which with our Institutions which are altogether popular) it is...
16 Wrote two Letters in the morning and amused myself with reading Miss Porters new Novel—Mary being much better we went again to see Mrs. Sergeant who detained us to Tea—Was introduced to Mr. Phew and his Son the latter of whom is a woe begone widower who is very desirous of being sent as Secretary of Legation with some of our Ministers abroad—He has never allowed his hair to be Cut since the...
As Mary is much better to day I hasten to write you that the Letter of yesterday may not create unnecessary anxiety—After taking an Emetic she was so much relieved I found it useless to send for a Physician and had resolution sufficient to starve her notwithstanding her freting which produced the best possible effects—This morning the alarming hoarseness with the fever have entirely...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Adams with many thanks for his “Address” on the 4th. of July, which is not less rich in excellent thoughts, than eloquent in the enunciation of them. RC ( MHi : Adams Papers). John Quincy Adams, An Address Delivered at the Request of a Committee of the Citizens of Washington; On the Occasion of Reading the Declaration of Independence, on the Fourth of...
We have arrived safely at this place without much trouble and the Horses stood it pretty well, but Mary is quite sick with one of her fevers, and I cannot tell how long we may be delayed—She is as usual quite unruly, and will do little or nothing that is recommended, so that I have ample scope for repentance at the charge I have undertaken, which is burthensome beyond all calculation, the...
Having arrived safely without any “hair breadth scapes” to relate, I have little or nothing to say, but, that we are well, that the Horses were very much frighten’d at their trip in the Steam boat, and that Dash is the admiration of every one; so much so that Joseph is very apprehensive we shall have him stolen— In Baltimore it is said that there is little or no fever—we remained there but an...
Mrs Porter’s compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams & Miss Helen & requests the pleasure of their company on friday evening PHi : Dreer Collection.
Our dear Shaw, who ransacks his Atheneum and the litterary World to afford me Amusements and Instruction, two evenings and one day in a Week, brought me on Saturday your Welcome letter of the 22d of May. The true cause of the infrequency of letters between You and me is a conscientious principle on my part. I know that you would answer every Scratch of a pen from me; but I k n ow the...
Bishop Chevreuse regrets that it will not be in his power to wait upon Mr. and Mrs. Adams, on Monday next, as he will be out of town by previous engagement. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have enclosed to the President a letter from Dr Waterhouse. I wish you would ask to see it. Between you and me I suspect that our friend Eustace has been of no service to Waterhouse. Ancient Jealousies of him among professional men in Boston may have left some traces. But as this is mere conjecture I lay no stress upon it. Whether any thing can be done for him consistent with the public...
I have received the Copy of your Report on weights and measures, which you were so good as to inclose to me. Not knowing how long it may be before I shall be able to give it a due perusal, I tender at once my best thanks, anticipating as I certainly do, both pleasure and instruction from your execution of the important task committed to you. Be pleased, Sir, to accept a repetition of my high...
Th: Jefferson returns his thanks to mr Adams for the copy he has been so kind as to send him of his very able and profound Report on Weights and measures. from the general view, the only one he has yet had time to take of it, it seems really to present every thing which is useful on the subject. he shall read it seriously, with the interest he takes in the subject and with an earnest desire to...
My thanks are due to you, and are most joyfully given, for two copies of your Report on Weights and Measures, one of them elegantly bound. Though I cannot say and perhaps shall never be able to say that I have read it, yet I have turned over Leaves of it enough to see that it is a Mass of historical, philosophical chemical mathematical and political knowledge which no Industry in this country...
Mr Pinkney presents his Complements to Mr. & Mrs. Adams and accepts with great pleasure the honour of their invitation to Dinner on Friday this 2d. March. MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr. Clay has the pleasure to accept the invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Adams to dinner on thursday the 8h. inst. MHi : Adams Papers.
I defer’d the acknowledgement of your very kind Letter of 14’ Augt untill I had completed the object mentiond in the Inclosed Vote—which has undergone a revission by the Corporation, (the first vote not being so full and satisfactory to me ) as I had stipulated was returned to them;) and only a few days since received it corrected— In which you will find I have taken an unauthorized liberty...
O that I had the talent at description of a Homer a Milton or a Walter Scott I would give you a picture of a hill that I have visited with more pleasure than I should mount Ida or Monticello. Mr David Hyslop has been importuning me for seven years to dine with him in Brookline: I have always declined till last Tuesday when taking my grandson George Washington Adams for my guide and aid de camp...
We find ourselves so very comfortable here and Mr. & Mrs. Graham are so urgent for us to stay until Sunday Night we shall not be at home until Tuesday Evening—As I know you would be very anxious to see us at the time first appointed and might be uneasy I send you a few lines to quiet any unnecessary apprehensions— The Country is beautiful and our reception has been as kind as you can possibly...
Our George has gained the first prize—and bares his honour meekly—He is a dutiful Son, for he is deeply engaged in Platonick Greek, In obedience to your advice and requisition—and what surprises me more is, that he is becoming an early riser—He was up this Morning before I was—And his Mind appears to be awakned by an Ambition to become an eminent and useful Man—John is at present devoted to...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mrss Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my Subscription for the National Intelligencer— I beg your pardon for not answering immediately your letter fo the 24th. of last Month as I ought—not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant family visit—& tendered me two...
I thank you for the promptitude with which you paid my debt to Mr Gales & Seaton—and discontinued my subscription for the national Intelligencer I beg your Pardon for not answering immediately your letter of the 24th of last Month as I ought—Not being pressed by necessity, I did not draw upon Mr Cruft—Till up he comes with his Lady to make us a very pleasant visit—And tendered me the two...
Inclosed is a letter, and an account from Mr. Gales for the National Intelligencer— I am very loth to trouble you—and I must beg the favour of you to pay Mr. Gales his account and take his receipt and his Certificate—My subscription is stoped—for I hereby request, and Order, that it may be stoped—for I never read it—I am overwhelmed with a Cart-load of Newspapers for which I never...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful salutation to mr Adams, and his thanks for the copy of the journals of the convention which he has been so kind as to send him. but also presented to the University of Virginia, has been properly addressed to Th:J. as Rector of that institution and shall be carefully preserved until the proper depository shall be provided. he prays mr Adams to be assured...
I have received and return my thanks for your polite favor accompanying the copy of the printed Journal of the Federal Convention transmitted in pursuance of a late Resolution of Congress. In turning over a few pages of the Journal, which is all I have done, a casual glance caught a passage which erroneously prefixed my name to the proposition made on the 7th. day of September for making a...
Deed recorded August 21st. 1821.— Whereas George Boyd and James L. Edwards on or about the fourth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen bargained and sold assigned transferred & conveyed unto the undersigned Overton Carr all the right title interest & estate of them the said George Boyd & James L. Edwards of in & to a certain house & lot then in the...
Whereas by Articles of Agreement dated the thirty first day of December eighteen hundred and thirteen, John P. Van Ness of Washington in the District of Columbia sold to George Boyd, then of the same place, the Land and dwelling House herein after described; and in consideration thereof, and of the execution by the said George Boyd, of his bond and obligation of that date, conditioned to pay...
I have the pleasure to inform you, that at a meeting of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, holden this day, you were unanimously, elected their President. Although your probable residence, at least for some years, at a distance from Massachusetts, may possibly form an objection, in your own mind, to the appointment, yet, in fact the duties of it are little more than nominal, they can...
L’Envoyé Extraordinaire & Ministre Plenipotentiare de Sa Majesté bièn Chretienne, & Madame De Neuville ont l’honneur d’inviter l’honorable Monsieur Adams et Madame Adams à assister au Service Solennel qui aura lieu dan l’Eglise de St Patrick le 24 de ce mois à 10 heures du matin pour le repos de L’ame de S. A. R Monseigneur Le Duc de Berri Fils de France. MHi : Adams Papers.
Plots & counterplots spring up like mushrooms in all directions, we shall hear enough of them, before the vista is enlightened ary a ray of hope—Madrid, Paris, Ireland & London, are the scenes of display at the present, of the turbid passions, which engender fears & dangers, for those who feel secure in their power & strength—This is a period, at the accession of a new King, & embarrassing...
Mr. Webster accepts with great pleasure Mr. & Mrs Adam’s Invitation to dine on Thursday— MHi : Adams Papers.
The subscriber to the inclosed paper has long been a friend to my family, and the circumstances therein related, and which are all to my certain knowledge correct, entitle him to the favorable consideration he solicits in behalf of his son. His wish is that the Danish minister should be consulted on the subject, and the idea that the communication being made by the American Secretary of State...
Mr Pinkney presents his Complements to Mr & Mrs Adams and will have the Honour to wait on them at Dinner on Thursday the 3d of February.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Mr William Davis Robinson has been some weeks in London, and is about departing for the United States, his intelligence & zeal, but more than all, his sufferings, will I am sure always recommend him to the kindness and attention of our countrymen. I could not let him depart hence without giving him a line to testify in his favour those sentiments, I shall ever feel in exercise I hope, to those...
Know ye, That upon the Day of the Date hereof, before Me, at a Court of Probate, held at Dedham, in the County aforesaid, the Will of John Adams, late of Quincy in the said County, Doctor of Laws deceased, a Copy of which to these Presents annexed, was proved, approved, and allowed: Who having, while he lived, and at the Time of his Death, Goods, Chattels, Rights or Credits in the County...
I John Adams of Quincy, in the County of Norfolk Esquire, do hereby give to my Son John Quincy Adams, of Boston, in the County of Suffolk Esquire, all my Manuscript Letter Books, and Account-Books, Letters, Journals, and Manuscript papers; together with the trunks in which they are contained; also a Bureau, with three large Drawers, two small Drawers, and two glass folding Doors, standing near...
KNOW all Men by these Presents, That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk Esquire, in Consideration of One dollar to me paid by John Quincy Adams, of Boston, in the County of Suffolk, Esquire the Receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, have remised, released, and forever quit-claimed, and do, for my self and my Heirs, by these Presents, remise, release, and forever quit-claim unto...
Know all Men by these Presents, that I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk, Esquire, in Consideration of one dollar to me paid by my Son John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk, Esquire, the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, and in Consideration of a Bond of the said John Quincy Adams to me, bearing even date with these Presents, and for divers other good and...
Number. 1 A volume of written extracts Quarto 2 Letter Book beginning from 26th May 1776 to 8th February 1778 Folio 3 Ditto from 3rd Febry 1777 to 7th July 1777. Ditto... 4. Journals of voyage to France in 1778. " 5 Letter Book France from 12th: May 1778 to 8 Novr. 1779. " 6 Journal 13 Feby. 1778 to 26th. April 1779—
I return the list of yeas & nays in the Convention, with the blanks filled, according to your request, as far as I could do it by tracing the order of the yeas & nays, and their co-incidences with those belonging to successive questions in my papers. In some instances, the yeas & nays in the list, corresponding with those on more questions than one, did not designate the particular question on...