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Inclosed is a Letter from Judah Alden of Duxbury, a fifty fifth Cousin of yours, on the Fisheries. And another from Freeman Atwood. I have not time to read these Papers but I believe you may depend upon them. I think I have Sent you proofs enough of the importance of the Fisheries to your Country. And my Advice is to demand your recall and refuse Your Signature to any compact which shall...
Mr Bray a Son in Law of Samuel Eliot Esquire, the putative Father of the Greek Professorship at H.C. will I hope have the honor to deliver this to you in the Bosom of all your Family. You probably know the political Connections of Mr Elliot and Mr Bray: but no considerations of this kind should interupt the Intercourse of Politeness hospitality and Civility. If my Eyes and hands could endure...
I must abide by the rule I have establishd, which is not to let any opportunity of writing to you, pass unimproved.—altho I have no later letters from you, to acknowledge than, that, from Paris of the 19th March. Since the receit of which, I believe I have written you half a dozen. I have little more to say now, than that we are all well, anxiously longing for Letters from you, and for...
My last Letter, was written last week, and addrest to mrs Adams, by the Amsterdam packet, which sail’d for Liverpool. it is now your turn, and I embrace the opportunity of introducing to you, a young Gentleman who was named for you, and whom you must recollect, as the Son of our Good Friends, dr and mrs Welch—he wishes to see you, and the Children, during the Short stay he will make in...
I am very sorry that I broke the glass, but I could not help it, and for that, I write you these verses. Tendre appuis de mes premiers ans Toi qui pris soins de mon enfance Je te dois tout, savoir, talens, Je te dois meme l’existence. De tant d’amour de tant de soins La récompense est ma tendresse Papa, tu me verras un jour, Étré l’appui de ta vielliesse. Accept this offer, I am, dear Papa, /...
This day compleats five weeks since my dear Boys embarked for Liverpool, and now I anticipate their arrival and your, and their Mothers joy at the prospect of meeting them. if it is equal to the pain I felt at parting with them, I can wish you no greater enjoyment. My Reason and judgment, both approved of their going to you, for they were approaching an Age, when more vigilance was necesary,...
Last night I recd the 3 Volumes D’Argens’s Ocellus, Timeus and Julian, and the Journal des debats and the Journal de L’Empire, to 22 Mars 1815. What curiosities, all? Tacitus, Quintillian, Jacques le Fataliste, what would you Say? Would you Still doubt? You ought not. The Lord God omnipotent reigneth, in Wisdom and benevolence beyond all our conceptions, let the Earth rejoice. You have heard...
I seem to be rambling with you, to the Hotell de Valois, the hotel du Roi &c &c but you have not yet visited Passy Chaillot, Auteuil, or Versailles, nor Mont Martyr nor Mount Calvaire. What has become of these Spots, where I have Taken so many anxious and Solitary Walks. Where is the Bois de Boulange? I envy you the Society of La Fayette and de Stael. The latter is more than her Father or...
My Brother William arrived here after a passage of thirty two days from Havre & has expressed to me his desire not to return to Europe, preferring to remain here, rather than be seperated from them, upon this communication, presuming it would not be disagreeable to you & of very extensive advantage to my future prospects, I have addressed Mr Munroe Secretary of State & have solicited the...
Yesterday, was one, of the most joyful days of my life Harriet Welsh, like a winged mercury, came flying with your Letters received by Mail in the morning, from N york. under cover from Napolean Caroline de Wint, who knowing my anxiety, respecting you, and Mrs Adams. she seizd them in the moment they were deliverd, and forwarded them by Mail, with the pleasing intelligence that her mother, and...
We are at our Wits ends for News from you. We know not whether you are at Ghent, gone to Paris, returned to Petersburg, or where you are. We are equally anxious for your Lady and your Son. We know not whether they are to remove from Petersburg by Land or by Water, to Ghent to Paris or to England. Gallia, the too faithful Alemick of Britain, “changeful as a Child at play Now calls in Princes...
Kealing marred Hannah Storer. Look at the seal of this Letter, and send me from London a new One exactly like it, with this Motto Piscemur, Venemur ut Olim and I will the Price to your Brother, / No more MHi : Adams Papers.
Inclosed I Send by your Sons, a little Information concerning the Fisheries. In tears for the loss of your Aunt Peabody; in too much Apprehension for tears at the Embarkation of your Sons which is to be next Sunday, and almost in tears of Indignation, at the Ignorance, and Insensibility of my dear New England, I Send you the inclosed Papers relative to the Fisheries. I will continue to collect...
"String after String, is severed from the Heart" The parting with my dear Boys the final parting, as I consider it, has excited the tenderest emotions of my Heart. I have Struggled to bring my mind to the test of reason, to that which was fittest and best. providence at this interesting period has Seen fit, to try me, by a Still Severer Stroke—by the Sudden and unexpected death of my dear and...
I inclose a Slip with an Essay in it, Signed Richlieu The Editor has poisoned it, with a Silly introduction; but that will not hurt it with you, ‘tho’ it Spoils it here. Who this Connecticut Gentleman is, I cannot conjecture. I did not believe, and cannot yet believe, that there is Brains enough, united with Courage and application enough, in that State to produce Such a paper. Trumbul?...
We live in dayly, hourly hopes of Letters from you at Paris. I wrote you by the Milo Capt Glover, and have written by the New Packett Captain Bronson, who is to carry your Sons under the care of Mr Samuel G. Perkins and his Lady. Two of our belle Esprits, the Greek Professor and Mr Ticknor, go in the Same Ship. The opportunity is favourable for our young Gentlemen, as far as We can judge. The...
The Galen, Capt Tracy, is ready to sail, and by her I write you a few lines altho much in haste. to say that we are all well, and preparing your sons; to send to you, in the crew packet. Captain Branson for Liverpool; he is from Hingham, and well known by the Children, which renders it much more agreable to them, than going with a Stranger. I hoped to have heard from you again, before we sent...
I know not whether you are acquainted with the Bearer of this Letter Samuel G. Perkins Esqr, or his Lady a Daughter of the aged and Honourable Stephen Higginson Esqr. Mr Perkins was one of my Associates in the Board of Trustees and Visitors. We have thought it, a fortunate Opportunity, Politicks apart, to Send your Sons with Mr and Mrs. Perkins, and their Son about Johns age, and especially as...
Mr Ticknor will go with your Sons. Let me introduce him to you. His Reputation is that of one of the first Schollars. W. Shaw will tell you how many Languages he reads. His Politicks are of little consequence to me, and I know them not. Probably of the Boston Fashion. My Son! You are now in the most difficult and dangerous Situation that you ever was in. You will be courted by Dissenters by...
If Parson Nelson could call that Composition of Alexander, Petrarch and Werter, The Admiral, “ Great and good , Surely it may be excusable in me, to make free with the Same Epithets. But away with Badinage. Be it known to you that I am in Correspondence, with your Rival; your victorious Rival; and what is more marvelous, a friendly correspondence. One of his Letters is inclosed, copied by your...
I write you from this place where I arrived last evening and where I have again met with a severe disappointment in not receiving Letters, more especially as the public News renders my situation extremely unpleasant— I shall leave this place for Mayence this Evening and propose to sleep there to Night and continue my rout tomorrow morning at five o’Clock I shall in all probability find you...
I have a rich Budget to send you by the next Ship. I have no time to prepare it by the Milo. I would send you some Newspapers but am told a Collection for the Months past is prepared for you Mr E. Copland Junr will present this. He is first Clerk to Degrand. You have all the Treaties and Projects of Treaties I presume but Britain and U. S. I presume from 1782 to 1815 Jays, Monroes Erskines and...
Mr Depand has sent his Clerk here this Evening, to say that he would sail tomorrow in the Milo, captain Glover of this Town. the notice is short, and I should regret it the more if I had not already written to you by this same vessel. I have acknowledgd the receit of your Letters No 66, 23 Nov’br not first received, than of 26 of December No 67, and this day by way of England, your Letter of...
I wrote you on the 25th of February on our American Title to all the Rights and Liberties of Englishmen in all the Fisheries, which We derive not from any Grant Gift Cession or Concession or Conveyance from the Government or People of Great Britain, but from the impartial Benevolence and Bounty and Benevolence of the Author of Nature and Father of Mankind, who has given the Ocean and all its...
yesterdays Mail brought us the Nomination s to foreign Courts, yours of course, was to England. altho no event could have been so agreable to me, as your return to America. I feel a relief that that you have left the cold region of the North; and come so much nearer to me, where I can hope, with the return of peace, a freer intercourse with you, the only solace left me, to compensate for your...
After a very troublesome and tedious journey we have happily arrived at Berlin where I expected to have found Letters from you but I am cruelly disappointed and am impatiently waiting for the next Post which will not arrive untill tomorrow evening Yesterday I visited some of our old friends here who received me in the Kindest manner possible Countess Bhrul is very much alter’d but Miss Bisho p...
Your Letter of Nov’br 23d No 66. came by way of England and reachd me on the 12th of this Month. at the Same time we received the News that a Treaty of peace between America and Great Britain was signed upon the 24th of December. A Blessing I hope. altho ardently desired, was not so soon expected, from the Hostile attitude which Britain had taken, and the nature of her demands, as exhibited in...
I have received your Letter of October. 27. 1814. and that of 26 of November. I congratulate you on the harmony between you and your Colleagues, an inexpressible Felicity of which I have not always been so fortunate as to enjoy the Sweets. I congratulate you also on the Peace and the glorious moment in which the News of it arrived. The Raptures of Joy I leave the Newspapers to describe. It is...
I have recd. your Letter of Oct. 27. 1814. and that of 26. of November. I congrtulate you on the harmony between you and your Colleagues an inexpressible Felicity of which I have not always been So fortunate as to enjoy the Sweets. I congratulate you also on the Peace and the glorious moment in which the News of it arrived. The Raptures of Joy I leave the Newspapers to describe. It is my...
We have proceeded thus far on our journey as well and with as much pleasure as we could possibly have expected and the day I have passed at this place will ever be remember’d by me with gratitude and pleasure from the very polite and kind attention of the Governor and his Lady to whom Mr Harris gave me letters of recommendation they are a charming couple exact suited to please me as they are...