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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy"
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Your Letter was brought to my chamber door and thrown in by your father this morning before I was up he having heard me express some anxiety to hear from you yesterday morning was so good as to give it me as soon as it arrived—I am delighted to learn that you adhere to your resolution of leaving Washington on the 20th. and shall be careful to have a conveyance for you to Quincy from Dedham—The...
Mr. Shaw brought me your letter last night of the 29 and you may be assured I will attend to the confidential injunction it contained— At the same time I will take the liberty of expressing my doubts as to the propriety of shrinking thus for ever from any manifestation of the publick feeling which it is natural to expect (and which with our Institutions which are altogether popular) it is...
16 Wrote two Letters in the morning and amused myself with reading Miss Porters new Novel—Mary being much better we went again to see Mrs. Sergeant who detained us to Tea—Was introduced to Mr. Phew and his Son the latter of whom is a woe begone widower who is very desirous of being sent as Secretary of Legation with some of our Ministers abroad—He has never allowed his hair to be Cut since the...
As Mary is much better to day I hasten to write you that the Letter of yesterday may not create unnecessary anxiety—After taking an Emetic she was so much relieved I found it useless to send for a Physician and had resolution sufficient to starve her notwithstanding her freting which produced the best possible effects—This morning the alarming hoarseness with the fever have entirely...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Adams with many thanks for his “Address” on the 4th. of July, which is not less rich in excellent thoughts, than eloquent in the enunciation of them. RC ( MHi : Adams Papers). John Quincy Adams, An Address Delivered at the Request of a Committee of the Citizens of Washington; On the Occasion of Reading the Declaration of Independence, on the Fourth of...
We have arrived safely at this place without much trouble and the Horses stood it pretty well, but Mary is quite sick with one of her fevers, and I cannot tell how long we may be delayed—She is as usual quite unruly, and will do little or nothing that is recommended, so that I have ample scope for repentance at the charge I have undertaken, which is burthensome beyond all calculation, the...
Having arrived safely without any “hair breadth scapes” to relate, I have little or nothing to say, but, that we are well, that the Horses were very much frighten’d at their trip in the Steam boat, and that Dash is the admiration of every one; so much so that Joseph is very apprehensive we shall have him stolen— In Baltimore it is said that there is little or no fever—we remained there but an...
Mrs Porter’s compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams & Miss Helen & requests the pleasure of their company on friday evening PHi : Dreer Collection.
Our dear Shaw, who ransacks his Atheneum and the litterary World to afford me Amusements and Instruction, two evenings and one day in a Week, brought me on Saturday your Welcome letter of the 22d of May. The true cause of the infrequency of letters between You and me is a conscientious principle on my part. I know that you would answer every Scratch of a pen from me; but I k n ow the...
Bishop Chevreuse regrets that it will not be in his power to wait upon Mr. and Mrs. Adams, on Monday next, as he will be out of town by previous engagement. MHi : Adams Papers.