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it has been oweing to the multiplicity of business that I have had upon my hands for a forghtnight past that I have omitted giving my Brother earlier information of our intended departure for Europe— we expect to sail in the course of this month— at first we intended going in the March Packett—but found it impossible to get ready we have therefore postponed our departure a few days untill the...
I had the pleasure to receive your kind Letter of the 18 th of May by Barnard and was much releived by being informed that our Mother was recovering her health as rapidly as could be expected— I feared from not having received a Single line from her; that she was not so well as my friends represented her to me we have had Letters from all my other friends except herself since our arrivall and...
As we have some skitish persons in the Family who are apprehensive of the small pox, and of every Body from your infected city, we shall not have the pleasure of your company, nor the office a visit from you this week. your cousin Lucy informd me to day that you had a letter from your sister. pray send it me or such extracts from it as will inform me how she does and the col and Boys. I am...
at 9 last night I arriv’d and this Morning have taken my Seat from whence I write this. I have just rec d yours of 22. Nov. with its Inclosure. I am told most confidently that all the Votes in N. Y. will be for Clinton and all the Votes in Pensilvania for me. I believe neither. If the People of the Union are capable of being influenced by Such Characters as Dallas and Edwards, I should be...
This Letter will be delivered you, by M r Roberdeau a Son of General Roberdeau my ancient Friend, lately married to Miss Blair a Daughter of Doctor Blair, whom your Mamma knows. I pray you to Shew all the Civility to M r Roberdeau in your Power. invite him to Quincy with you to keep sunday with your Mamma and shew him Boston and Cambridge, Colledge Library Apparatus &c and give him all the...
Prince will bring this to you; the inclosed Letters I wish you to direct, the thin Paper, to your Father The other to Thomas; Prince is to return on thursday morg̃ by him send the papers and any Letters which you may have; if the weather should prove pleasent, I shall send a Horse for you on saturday. I have seen the dr since I wrote to you, and talkd with him about the meddow. he thinks that...
I rec d by the last post your favour of the 16. The Votes from New Hampshire to Maryland inclusively have been unanimous excepting the factious Voice of New York, and one D r Johnson of Conecocheague formerly a New Yorker a Particular Friend of M r Clinton and by his own confession under particular Obligations to him. Southward of Chesapeak all are for Clinton except S. C. I thank you for your...
I am again entertained by your kind Letter of the 22. Ult. The Intrigues of M r Clinton M r Burke M r Dallas M r Pierpoint Edwards, &c with Several Members of Congress from Virginia N. C. Georgia and Kentucky aided by Governor Hancock, have given a very odd cast to the Election: but they have Seperated the sheep from the Goats— There must be however more Employment for the Press in favour of...
The Public Papers will inform you that M r Jefferson has resigned and that M r Randolph is appointed Secretary of State. The Attorney General is not yet nominated. M r Lewis M r Lawrence M r Benson M r Gore, M r Potts &c have been mentioned in Conversation. The Motives to M r Jeffersons Resignation are not assigned, and are left open to the Conjectures of a Speculating World. I also am a...
Although your modesty would not inform Us, of your commencement as a Faneuil Hall Orator, it is impossible to conceal from the Public so important an Event, when there are 500 talkative noisy Witnesses of it, and accordingly it has come to me from an Eye and Ear Witness, as I suppose, your young Friend Breck. I rejoice that you have taken the Unpopular Side of the Questions concerning...
I have great Satisfaction in your Letter of the 10 th. The Breaking of the Bubble of Banks would be a Blessing if it could teach our People to beware of all other Bubbles. But I fear We shall have a Succession of them. I hope however at least they will teach you caution. “The Rivalries of our most conspicuous Characters” are such as human Nature produces under the Cultivation of such a...
I received the copies of your Oration by M r Atkinson for which I give you my own and the thanks of my friends Unwilling to trust my own partial judgment upon the performance I have endeavored to collect the opinions of those of my friends here who are most remarkable for their taste and my own ideas have been justified by the universal applause which has been bestowed upon your Oration. I...
Congress have rec d from the President all the Negotiations with France and England as well as those with the Indians. On Monday We expect those with Spain and all the Intelligence rec d respecting the Algerines. The whole forming a System of Information which Shews our dear Country to be in a critical Situation. So critical that the most sanguine are constrained to pauze and consider. The...
I inclose to you your Brothers Letter I should have Sent for you last saturday but I expected a snow storm. I suppose your Father has written to you. he is vex’d with the Printer for Publishing in three Numbers what ought all to have been in one. he says the writer of Columbus had better publish in a pamphlet by which a printer may get money, and as pamphlets are much in vogue at present....
I wish you to direct the inclosed Letter—to your Father I read Barnevelt in Mondays paper. it may be necessary to defend himself, but I look upon his opponent in a contemtable light, and that no honour or reputation is to be obtaind in a contest with him. I therefore wish to see Barnevelt close Your Father is really affraid that columbus may be inflated with vanity and too much emboldened. he...
This morning I had the Pleasure of your Letter of the 2 d of this month. The Town meeting did itself honour by its judicious Result. But there has not been the Same Wisdom in New York nor Philadelphia: nor is there equal Wisdom and Decision in either house of Congress. All that has been done has been to restrain and moderate the constant disposition to rashness Intemperance and Madness. M r...
I have rec d your favour of the 22 d I believe it is, and am glad to hear that the People of Boston are disposed to Stand firm on neutral Ground. Much will depend upon their Stability. There are so many Interests constantly contriving to draw Us off, from that Position, that if Boston should fail Us We should be in great danger. I feel for the Sufferers under the Unexampled depredations of the...
The Old Debtors to British subjects, united with the over Zealous Friends of France and the Democratical societies of our principal Cities, are urging a sequestration of Things in Action: and as I know you are not inattentive to any question of public Law, I have inclosed you some minutes of Authorities and I wish you to look into all others relative to this subject. I have not Grotius here,...
I received your favor of the 18 ult o inclosing the money you was so kind as to procure for me. I laughed for half an hour at the witticism upon Orator Adams’ occupation. At the second Townmeeting I am informed you came forward and acquired much honor, as the business eventually redounded to the honor of the town of Boston I was pleased that you had signalized yourself I see very plainly...
If the combined Powers are exhausted by their Exertions The French must be no less distressed by theirs, and each Party thinks it is contending for Existence.— My Calculation is that the other Powers in Combination will hold out as long as England although Spain and Prussia may Slacken their Exertions: and that England will continue the War till the Three Per Cents Consolidated fall to fifty...
I have rec d your favour of April 22 and am pleased with your Observations on the Doctrine of Reprisals on Choses in Action. As it is a Subject, which is likely to be discussed among Mankind for many Years to come, England France and Spain having lately attempted something of the kind, every Book which can throw any Light on it, ought to be looked up. Spain is Said to have confiscated or...
In reading the Advertisement prefixed to De Lolme p. 6. I met a Passage which recalled to my Mind a Letter of yours concerning the Papers signed Columbus and the cold reception they met with among their Friends. “I shall add, says he, a few Observations, of a serious kind for the Sake of those Persons who, judging themselves to be possessed of Abilities find they are neglected by those having...
Your Letter of April 27 was put into the Post office at New York and I have neither seen nor heard of M r Dorr nor M r Jones. It is probable they found a Conveyance for their Letters in the ship which carries our Envoy Extraordinary and their Journey to this Town became unnecessary. I should have been glad to have seen them and I suppose they might have obtained their Request without...
The Secretary of State called upon me this morning to inform me by order of the President, that it was determined to nominate you to go to Holland as Resident Minister. The President desired to know if I thought you would accept. I answered that I had no Authority from you— But it was my Opinion that you would And that it would be my Advice to you, that you should. The Salary is 4500 Dollars a...
Since, I wrote you this morning, at the request of M r Randolph a thousand things occur to me to say to you, but as I have not time at present I shall write you from day to day. You will have a Collection to make of the Journals of Congress and the Laws of the Union; and all the Reports of our Ministers of State to take with you. You must remember all the Relations of the U. S. with all...
Yesterday the Senate advised the Appointment of M r short to Madrid, but there has as yet been no nomination to the Vacancy at the Hague. The Person however is determined on, and the Nomination will probably be made as soon as I am gone homewards— I have but one night and an half more to stay here. This Nomination, which is the Result of the Presidents own Observations and Reflections, is as...
Yesterday the Senate received a Message from The President of the United States, containing a Nomination of John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts to be Resident Minister of U. S. at the Hague: and this day the Senate are to Say whether they Advise & consent to his Appointment or not. M r Monroe, who is appointed Minister Plenipotentiary to France, Yesterday desired me to mention to You in my...
The Senate have this Day unanimously advised and consented to the Appointment of John Quincy Adams to the Hague. If this Event should affect your Sensibility as much as it does mine, it will made a deep Impression upon Your Mind, both of the Importance of the Mission and of your obligation to Gratitude Fidelity and Exertion in the Discharge of the Duties of it. At two O Clock tomorrow Morning...
My Dear Nephew could not suppose a Friend to merit, could read a Paragraph in last Saturdays Paper, without feeling themselves gratified, by finding that the opinion of Persons of the highest eminence entirly coincided with their own— He who has obstinately, & undeviateingly persevered in a course of Study, who “can bring back at Eve, the manners of the Morn immaculate,” & steadily pursue the...
I received your Letter this morning of the 12 th and one from N york by your Brother Charles, who got here the day before commencment; in good Health & spirits. your Father and Brother, myself and Louissa all went together to commencment. the weather was uncomfortably Hot. it was otherways an agreeable day. I hope you will not experience any unusual inconvenience from the Heat of Philadelphia....
You will find herewith sundry Documents marked A, B, C, D, E, F, G, & H—A being a copy of the Presidents Power to me to conduct certain loans, directed by two Acts of Congress therein referred to, B a Copy of a power from me to Messrs. Wilhem and Jan Willinks & Nicholas & Jacob Van Staphorst & Hubbard predicated upon that of the President to me, C a copy of a power from me to Mr. Short founded...
Upon a revision of the Loans, which have been made under the Acts of Congress of the 4th. & 12th. of August 1790, I have discovered, that a loan for One Millions of Guilders, made the 1st. of June 1793, is not upon the list marked E, accompanying the other papers, mentioned in my letter to you of the 8th. Instant. In consequence of this omission, the sum already borrowed in pursuance of the...
In its due time, I received your Letter from Philadelphia of the 27. of July. Although, in the Opinion of The Secretary of State, the Mission to Holland may be “almost exclusively reduced to a pecuniary Negotiation,” yet, in the Opinion of others among whom your father is one, the Post at the Hague is an important Diplomatick Station, which may afford many opportunities of acquiring political...
I once more wish you a prosperous Voyage an honourable Conduct and a happy Life. Remember your Characters as Men of Business as well as Men of Virtue, and always depend on the Affection and Friendship of your Father RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “My Sons”; internal address: “John Quincy and Thomas Boylston Adams”; endorsed by JQA : “My Father 14. Sept r: 1794. / Rec d: at Boston.” Tr ( Adams...
This day compleats Ten weeks, since you sailed and I have had no opportunity before this, by Captain Scott, of writing to you, unless by way of Amsterdam, where I have little hope of finding you. The Arms of France have proved so powerfull, and their victorys have been so rapid, that I should not be surprized to learn, that they had renderd your commission Nul & void, by overturning the...
The United States have funds of some consequence in the hands of our Commissioners at Amsterdam, over and above what may be required for approaching payments. The Situation of Holland according to the last advices, leaves me not without disquietude on this account; for bidding the negotiation of bills upon that Country without great sacrifice. I have therefore directed the Treasurer to draw...
Holland, according to our latest Accounts from Europe, may so very possibly have been overrun by the French that it is uncertain where this Letter will find you. As you have a French Tongue in your head, and received a Part of your Education in France, I Should be under no Apprehensions, of your receiving any uncivil Treatment if you were to be wholly among the French, especially as you are a...
Since writing to you on the first instant, of which the foregoing is a Copy, it has become necessary to inform you, that in consequence of the Presidents having directed Mr. Pinckney to repair immediately to the Court of Madrid, there is a possibility, that he may set out upon his Mission, before the bill drawn upon our Commissioners in Amsterdam reaches London. If this should prove to be the...
I wrote to you by Captain Scott Some time in December. on the 14 of the Month Captain Joy arrived in Boston, after a passage of 63 days. by him we learnt the agreable News of the arrival of the Alfred, in a passage of 32 days. to know that the ship was arrived, was a relief to my mind. to have heard from my dear sons, would have been a cordial to my Heart, but the Gen ll Lincoln was comeing...
The inclosed copy of a Letter of this date to Messrs. Wilhem & Jan Willink &c will inform you an arrangement which has been made for the payment of a Sum of principal and interest of the Dutch Debt which will accrue on the first of June next (vizt.) Florins Principal 1000000 Interest  270000 and of the direction to them to concert with you the best arrangement of the matter. If you find it...
It was with great pleasure that I received by Captain Perkings from Rotterdam your Letter of the 15th of December, which reachd me on the 7th of this Month, and is the first line from your Hand. A fortnight Since Your Father Sent me two Letters received from Thomas, one to him, and one to me, written in London the Day after His arrival. at the Same Time the Secretary of State received Letters...
M r Wilcocks a Son of M r Wilcocks a respectable Lawyer of this City is bound to Hamborough and from thence intends to go to Holland where I hope you will Shew him as much Civility as you can. He will be able to tell you all the news we have. Congress has had the most Serene Session I ever knew. We are waiting for M r Jays Treaty and hope it will Settle all disputes with England and quiet many...
I have but lately received your kind Letter from Amsterdam of the 17 th of November and another from the Hague much longer and of an earlier date. The last I have Sent to M r Randolph to be laid before the President, as it contains ample and important Information. These are the only Letters I have as yet rec d from you. Your Mother has received others. Your Letters both public and private, I...
I have but lately received your kind Letters of the 3 d and 21. of Dec r. — They were like cold Water to a thirsty soul.— While I acknowledge your and your Brothers goodness in writing to me, I am afraid I ought to make an Apology to both, for having written so seldom to You. The late Elections to Congress have gone in general in favour of the Fœderal Government, in the Senate especially. The...
I received your very excellent Letter No 4 written from the Hague, dated 11 of November. accept my thanks. Your Letters are a source of consolation for your absence and do honor to the Hand which indites & the Heart which dictates them. I hope you have received those which I have written to you. my last No 3 was sent by way of Hambugh Mr W Cunningham has a vessel going immediatly to Amsterdam....
I have received your Letters Numbers 1. 2. 3. 4. and 5. but not in the order, in which they were written— Number one, was the last rec d as it came to hand by the last Post. Never was a Father more Satisfied, or gratified, than I have been with the kind Attention of my sons Since they went abroad. I have no Language to express to you the Pleasure I have rec d from the Satisfaction you have...
Your Letter of Feb ry 12 th reachd me on the last of April, and gave me Sincere pleasure and satisfaction to learn that both you and your Brother were in good Health and spirits, and that in the midst of such a mighty Revolution as you have been witness too, You have beheld the still greater Phœnomenon of order Peace and tranquility, that they may be durable to our good Batavian Friends, and a...
I arrived here Yesterday from Philadelphia in my Way to Quincy. My little Flock are now all collected, except the two in Holland and all in good health excepting Johnny Smith who has the Ague severely. The Senate after a Session of 19 or 20 Days compleated their deliberations on the Treaty. The Result is Advice to ratify it except one Article or rather to ratify it all provided a new Agreement...
The last letter I received from you was dated the 16 th of April and contained not only the latest but by far the most satisfactory intelligence, we had received. I thought that is was proper to give the most of it to the public, especially, as the accounts from England of the same date were very unfavorable. The conduct of the French toward the Batavians, since the conquest of Holland, has...
I have rec d your Letters in Succession to N. 9. I think inclusive but they are in So much request in this Country that I can never keep them long enough to make regular Answers to them. The Last appeared to me of Such Consequence that I Sent it to The President to whom I have communicated all of them I believe or all but the first, from London. I have Reason to think that your whole...