You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, John Quincy
  • Period

    • Washington Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 12

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 138 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Two vessels are notified, one for England, the other for Hamburgh. I will write by both, but the pleasure and freedom of communication, is much damp’d by the restraints of Station, and the apprehension of Capture. It is now several Months since I took my pen to address you. I believe my last date was in December. I have since written largly to Thomas, but fear my Letter is still waiting a...
Yes, my friend you have answered me as I deserve, and made me feel the striking difference between us, from the moment I had dispatched that letter, I regretted my folly, and felt sincerely ashamed of my ridiculous conduct— Dictated by anger, without time for reflection, I scarcely know what I wrote— you appeared to think I had not acted with delicacy, and my pride was wounded at the manner in...
I have recieved your letters of Jan ry. 28. and 31. which have afforded me more real satisfaction, than I have latterly been accustomed to experience— I think, I have at length discovered the meaning, of those very disagreeable expressions suspicion , and distrust , and can assure my best friend, if he alludes to what I said, respecting the circumstance that happened in our family, from the...
Yes, my beloved friend, my spirit is roused , and I am determined to bear with fortitude what it is vain to lament— E’re this, you will have recieved my letter in answer to yours of December the 20, in which I have explained my sentiments as clearly as possible, it probably has displeased you, but remember my situation admits not of hesitation, or affectation , and though while I wrote it I...
Almost immediately after I had dispatched my last, I recieved yours of 31 st December, and was delighted to see that you were again become the tender and affectionate friend I had always found you. All the family but me recieve letters from Boston, and Tom excuses himself by saying, it is generally supposed I am married and have accompanied you to Lisbon. he desires Mama to send him my...
I have recieved your very decisive letter of 20 th December, which has astonished and mortified me so much, that I can scarcely believe you recollected to whom you were writing— You seem to complain of a want of confidence on my part, and tell me it is what you have repeatedly solicited and what you again think it necessary to recommend— Surely you cannot imagine the authoritative stile of...
In my last I mentioned having recieved yours of the 13 December, which time our general regulator opposed my answering— Shall I my best friend acknowledge the confession you there make, affords me no small satisfaction. I know not if it is the result of vanity, but am pleased to find a mind energetic as yours, own the theory of fortitude to be easier than the practice— I have frequently...
I have recieved your letters which afforded me infinite pleasure as they assured me you were well and in good spirits— You tell me you are to remain at the Hague, and that you hope a greater distance, and longer time of seperation than we had contemplated, will have no effect upon my affection— I am almost angry when I read that part of your letter, as it implies a sort of doubt which I am...
Agreable to my promise of the 29 th of writing to my beloved friend once a week I now contrary to etiquette enter upon the pleasant occupation— Surely you will acknowledge—when I tell you you are indebted to me four letters I have amply compensated for my former omission— I have vainly expected to hear from you but the winds are unfavorable in a word every thing seems to conspire— I will only...
As I came through New York, where I found your Sister and your Brother and their families in good health I rec d your Letter N o. 24. and upon my arrival here, presented it to The President together with the preceeding Numbers to 19 inclusively. I dined with him on Saturday when he returned me the Letters, with an Eulogium. He Said that “Things appeared to him exactly as they do to your son”...
In my last I told you I believe how inadequate I found myself to the task of answering your very painful letter of the 12 th — Indeed my beloved friend my heart had at that moment recieved so deep a wound I scarce know how I acquired resolution sufficient to acknowledge it— Days are elapsed and I have in vain implored the friendly aid of reason, but she like the world in the hour of trial is...
William Shaw came from Boston last Evening to keep Sabbeth with me and brought me your Letter of August 16. 1796 which came by way of N York, and one for your Father of 13 th . he Sat out for Philadelphia on the 23 of this Month. I forwarded it to him this morning. it was the Duplicate which first came to hand, and tho it almost put out my Eyes to read it, I did, and made a coppy of it before...
I have within the last sad hour recieved your affectionate though painful letter of the 12 which caused me more uneasiness than I am capable of expressing; indeed I know not how I shall answer it— Ah my beloved friend how shall I acquire fortitude to bear my present disappointment— You have it is true kindly endeavoured to heal the wound so reluctantly given, but in vain each endearing line...
I have to acknowledg the receipt of two kind Letters from You Since I wrote You last, No 21 from the Hague June 30. and No 22 July 25. for both of them accept my Cordial Thanks. Letters from either of my sons, give me a flow of spirits for a week, and a Durable gratification in the perusal of them, as they contain judicious reflections and observations which would do honour to the most...
I know not where to find you—Whether in Holland England or Portugal—Whether to address you as a married Man or a Single one. And I am equally at a Loss what to write to you. one thing I am at no loss to say that your Letters have continued up to N o. 23. inclusively to delight and inform me, and that I beg you not to be discouraged from continuing your favours, by my Remissness in Writing Our...
How my much loved friend Shall I atone. for the uneasiness my last letter caused you— Could my picture at the moment I read those lines so descriptive of your affectionate pain have proved a true index of my soul it would I am persuaded in your gentle bosom have procured my peace— Allow me to say I saw in yours, or thought I saw an inexpressible something that did not do justice to the...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...
Your favor of the 13 th came to hand on the 26 th. by which I find that you had not determined on the time of your departure or the Rout you should persue, tho you say you should prefer that by way of England if you are permitted & a Passage in a Neutral Vessell could be obtaind to carry you to your destination; I donot know the propriutory or Impropiutory of your comeing this way, therefore I...
After waiting with extreme anxiety I recieved my friend your very short letter of the 12 th Ins t which afforded me both pleasure and pain: it has realized an apprehension I had lately entertained, I knew not why of your having erroneously supposed me dazzled with what you stile rank. Permit to say that having always been taught to consider domestic happiness alone permanent I am and sincerely...
The want of opportunity, and leisure, has a long time prevented me from writing you. The ship Mary Peggy, from Georgetown for Amsterdam has moved down & now lies in the stream opposite my house, waiting for the wind & tide. I have tried for a fortnight past to get a moment’s leisure to write you, but Mess rs. Morris & Nicholson are now here and their business together with the settlement &...
To open a correspondence with you on so trifling a subject as that which gives birth to this letter, would hardly be Justified, were it not for the singularity of the case. This singularity will, I hope, apologize for the Act. Sometime ago—perhaps two or three months—I read in some Gazette, but was so little impressed with it at the time (conceiving it to be one of those things which get into...
How shall I answer my dear friends last charming letter where find words adequate to the pleasure I experienced at reading it the idea of your returning almost compensates for the pain I felt at parting— Yet shall I confess fears arise which never presented themselves before. When I reflect upon the part in life I shall have to act with the little I have seen of the world my conscious...
Sunday last brought to hand your invaluable letter of the 6 th shall I confess I was nearly too much elated to know what I read having vainly flattered myself from the intelligence I previously received of your immediate return but alas how delusive is hope how was I disappointed to find you might not return till the Spring. You ask my permission to come here Oh my best friend you already know...
Since the date of my last July 11 th I have received an Authentic account of Your appointment as Minister Plenipo. to the Court of Portugal. it was the last nomination which the President made, before the rising of Congress, and took place after your Father came home, without its ever being hinted to him. the appointment was agreed to as mr otis informs me, unanimously by the Senate. this is...
I have many favours in Letters, Newspapers, Pamphlets and Books to thank you for, the latest of which were dated about 20 th of May— And I have many prosperous Events to congratulate you upon—your Promotion to Portugal and for what I know your Marriage by this time. I rejoice in every Thing that promotes your Honour and felicity— But whether you will relish Portugal, I know not. However bitter...
Permit me to felicitate you on your appointment to the Court of Lisbon which pleasing intelligence I received since my last was written I learn from our friend M r: Hall that it is probable you will return I think I need not tell you how much it will contribute to my happiness to see you yet should you not wish me to accompany you I must entreat you will take another route though I confess I...
How shall I express my impatient anxiety at not hearing from you, five tedious weeks have elapsed without a line to say you are well or that I still retain a place in your remembrance— I learn continually the arrival of the Mails, consiquently am alarmed at your silence— Absence I have often heard is dangerous, were I to judge solely from my own feelings I should say that little was to be...
This is the Aniversary of the Birth which of that Day when as the poet expresses it, We have in commemoration of it Drank the Health of the American Minister at the Hague nor did we forget to Breathe a fervent petition to Heaven for a perfect restoration of the Health of his equally beloved Brother. I am Maternal Heart of is pained & distresst to hear of the repeated Sickness of my Dear...
Your favor of the 2 d of last Month never came to hand until the 27 th. in course I could not but entertain fears that some accident had befallen you or that something was the cause of your silence, the receit of this removed those fears & give us much pleasure in finding you were safe & well— Since you left us M r. Gore one of the Commissionrs for the adjustment of Captured property has...
So totally incapacitated do I feel myself for writing were it not through fear of giving you pain I certainly shou’d indulge my avowed aversion to it and decline the task but judging of your feelings by my own think it incumbent on me to avail myself of every opportunity of testifying my affectionate esteem for you I yesterday received yours of the 17 instant in which you desire my opinion of...
I came into Town Yesterday with your Father, and was surprizd to find mr Gore upon the point of Sailing for England. I had lookt for him at Quincy before he went, but being himself Hurried and having but just returnd from Philadelphia, he had not Time to come out. Mrs Gore accompanies him. mr Tudor is also Passenger in the same vessel with many others from this place. It will be needless to...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of Several Letters from You Since Your arrival in London, the first Nov br 24 th Jan ry 6 th Feb ry 23, and Yesterday I received Yours of March 20th, for all of which, accept my Thanks, and believe that they are to me a most Valuable Deposit. The desire You express, that no warmer encomium may be bestowed upon You; than a bare approbation, may restrain my pen,...
After a tedious Session of Congress, rendered uncommonly disgusting by the obstinacy of a Party in the House of Representatives, I had an Opportunity of Signing a Bill for the appropriations necessary for the Treaties with Great Britain Spain Algiers and some Indians and then asked and obtained Leave of Absence— Here I am, so absorbed in the Embraces of my Family and my rural Amusements that I...
M r Richard Cooke of Mary land will tell you all the News— I expect to sign the Bills this day which were all passed Yesterday for carrying into E xn. the Treaties with Great Britain Spain Algiers and the Indians— Yesterday seemed a Day of Universal and perpetual Peace foreign & domestic. Tomorrow I go home— Congress will rise by the 20 th. There is much Talk of the Resignation of the P. a...
I had the pleasure yesterday to receive your kind letter of the 23 d of Febuary from London— we supposed that you had returnd to the Hague ere that period— the communication is so much more regular from England to this Country that we should hear more frequently from you from there than from Holland—which is a sufficient inducement to me to desire that you should remain there— you receive I...
Your kind letters of Dec r 30 th from London and of Nov r 4 th from Helvoetsluys have been both received. that of the latest date reached me about six weeks before the other. I am balancing in my mind whether or not to draw bills they are now four pr Cent below par but objects of speculation are also low. six pr Cents at seventeen shillings and the rest of the funds in proportion. All kinds of...
On the 19 th: inst: the packets entrusted by you to the care of Erving, were handed me by M r: Skinner. The letter for Mess rs: Willink was sent them the day following, at which time I made application for a Bill in your favor as desired. The enclosed letter for Mess rs: John & Francis Baring & C o will be equally efficacious as a Bill; & the reason why this mode is prefered will readily...
Your favor of the 13 ult. came to hand the 31 st: and that of the 24 th: on the 3 d: cur t: I have to thank you kindly for your prompt execution of my Several Commissions, all the articles of which have been received. It is certainly an erroneous idea, which some of our American friends have expressed, that I am to be charged with a Commission rather than you. I have been long convinced of the...
I have this morning received your favours of Jan. 7 and February the first with the Newspapers for which I thank you— I rec d some days ago a Letter with the Review and some other Papers. I thank you for all these Marks of your kind Attention. a few Lines from you are always acceptable as they are Information of your Health and Situation, but your long Letters are fraught with such Information...
Seven Months were nearly elapsed, from the Date of Your former Letter, to the receipt of yours on the 22 of this Month Which was of Nov’ br 7 th ; from Helvoetsluice. You from experience can judge, how acceptable it was to me. the very sight of a Letter exilirates my Spirits, and I tread back ten years in an instant. I felt all you described from your Situation, and could trace you into the...
I came to Town yesterday, and find a vessel going to sail for England tomorrow, and I would not let the opportunity pass without writing You a few Lines. I have not received a line from You since the 31 of July. Your Father sent me by the last post from Philadelphia Your Letter no 12 dated the 30 of August which he received two Days before. that Letter further unfolds the Secreet Machinations...
Your letter of the 15 th September arrived yesterday I own I have not so much cause to complain of my brothers as they have of me. It is reported and generally beleived that our Present Chief will decline serving for another term. I have been informed from good authority that such are his intentions. It is to be hoped that he will not make the trial as I am confident The People of this Country...
It has been announced in the Dutch Gazettes as an extract from those of London, that you had delivered Credentials to his Majesty as Envoy from the United States. The article somewhat terrifies me, from the apprehension, that your visit will be protracted, beyond the term of our first expectations. M r: Pinckney is probably in England by this time, as he was some weeks since said to be at...
By your old Acquaintance M r Hall, who is bound to Europe I shall Send you Some Newspapers, which will give you a general View of the Complexion of our Public Affairs. Upon Meeting and conversing with the Members of Congress I find that although there will be Noise there will be no Serious Evil this session. The Treaty if it comes back ratified by the K of G. B. will be Supported and executed...
I inclose to you the Cupons of Feb ry and June. 2 for that Month and 20 for Febry. 21 in one paper and 8 in an other. you will convey them in the best manner to Holland and direct new obligations to be taken for the interest, drawing upon them however for the amount of what you pay to Mrs Copley on my account. I mentiond to you or Thomas a Watch. you may purchase one for me, but the cost of...
As capt Scott has not yet saild, it gives me an opportunity of informing you that last Evening I received the Miniatures, and they were next to personally Seeing you; for the likenessess are very good. the Painter however, it is said has given a more flattering Likeness of you than of Thomas I am perfectly satisfied with them and want to be constantly looking at them. Tis now a long time Since...
The last Letter which has come to hand from you, was dated 27 July, now four Month. I begin to grow impatient to hear from you. I have lately sent my Letters by Way of England, where it is confidently said you are, and from whence I expect, to hear from you I wrote to you not long since by a private Hand a mr Wilder from N Hampshire. by him I sent you some of Websters papers containing col...
Since my last I have received your N o. 11. dated 27. July with the Pamphlets which accompanied it. The Entertainment and Enjoyment I derive from these Communications as well as from all your Letters, is beyond all your Conception as well as my Expression. My greatest Satisfaction arises from the Proofs they carry with them that your Judgment and Constancy and Fortitude are not to be warped by...
I am informed of a Vessell to sail for England soon and I have been too remiss already not to embrace this opportunity of writing to you— I had the pleasure to hear from you soon after your arrival— but since that time I have been indebted to our Parrents and Charles for information respecting you— but I am so conscious of my own deficiencies that I cannot complain of yours— nevertheless I...
I hear of a vessel going to Amsterdam, and tho I presume you are not in Holland, I shall write a few lines just to let you know that we are all well, and that your Letters by capt Trevett, who saild from Roterdam arrived safe and the Books, but the Bracelets you mention intending to send by it, I have not any tydings of. it would have been fortunate if you had given them to the Captain, as...