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Mrs Hay call’d, and left me your Letter. tho I have not written to you before I have had you constantly upon my mind, and have been anxious for your Health. I have heard of you several times. I think you would mind an advantage in drinking valerian & camomile Tea, for those spasm’s you complain of. I am not able to say to you as yet, when I shall go to Newyork. I have received only one Letter...
I have sent you the Cloth the coat & Boots. the Glass I have not yet been able to find. inclosed is an other article the amount of what I engaged to you. The Horse I had engaged to keep for a Gentleman till Monday next, so that I could not without forfeiting my word let him go till twesday provided I should not sell him to him. I am sorry, for if I should not part with him then: I should not...
I thank you my dear Son, for your dutiful Letter of the 28 th. of June, and rejoice, with exceeding Joy, in the recovery of your health My Advice is, to give yourself very little Thought about the Place of your future Residence. a few Months will produce changes that will easily Settle that Question for you. M r Parsons’s great Law Abilities make me wish that the Public may be availed of them,...
Altho I have written you before, I know you have no objection to recieving another letter before you answer my last— My greatest motive for writing now is to know the truth of a Report which has been industriously spread here within this week past, “that there is so great a Coolness between the P——t & V-P——t that they do not speak to each other.” I know that there are some people, (I hope but...
one would suppose that the waters between N york and Road Island had produced the same effect upon you, that the Poets feign of the River Lethe, not a Line, not a word from you since you quitted Richmond Hill. are you so wholy absorpd in the study of the Law of Nations as to forget those of Nature? I have been very sorry since you left us that your visit was made just at the period it was. a...
I have lived long in expectation of the pleasure of receiving a letter from my Dear Brother but at length I am reduced to despair; and am led to inquire what has prevented the fullfillment of a promise which you made at your departure upon my requesting you to write;— I hope you did not suppose that my absence during your visit arrose from any inattention towards yourself;— most certainly if I...
I hope your Anxiety, about your Prospects of future Life, will not be indulged too far. If, after your Term with M r Parsons expires your Judgment, Inclination and Advice of your Friends lead you to Boston, you shall have my full Consent and Approbation. If you could contrive to get a Small Family into my House with whom you could reputably board: and could reserve the best Room and Chamber,...
There is a sett of Scotch Writers that I think deserve your Attention in a very high Degree. There are Speculations in Morals Politicks and Law that are more luminous, than any other I have read. The Elements of Criticism and other of Lord Kaims’s Writings—Historical Law Tracts—sir James Steuart—Adam Smith &c both his Theory of Moral Sentiments and his Wealth of Nations— There are several...
I have this morning received your agreable Letter of the 19. Ult. and am pleased with your prudent deliberation and judicious decision, upon the Place of your future residence. The Promotion of M r Sullivan, will lead him out of Town upon the Circuits and give room to others to take his Place upon occasions. You are not however to expect a run of Business at first. Your Project of boarding...
I have received and read with great Pleasure your Letter: but having lent it to Col. Humphreys I cannot now answer it so particularly as I wish.—I thank you for it and desire the continuance of your Observations and Speculations in the Same Way. You have quoted a Poet, much to the Purpose: I wish to know whether it is Shakespear, and where it is to be found.—I would not wish you to be...
I had the pleasure to receive a letter from my Dear Brother many weeks since, I must acknowledge that I have been very deficient in attention by thus long neglecting to acknowledge its receipt, and I cannot find any sufficient appology to you, except a certain Indolence which at times takes possession of me and unfits me for writing—and which I presume others are not more exempt from them my...
I am not willing you should want Information from the Seat of Govt: but I can do little more than Send you a Newspaper. This Day twelve months I first took the Seat in which I now Sett, and I have not been absent one Moment, when the Senate has been Sitting, excepting one Day when my own Salary was under Consideration. This Confinement will injure my health, if I cannot Soon take a Journey. Mr...
your letter my Dear Brother of May 1 st I received three or four weeks past —just at the moment when I was removeing, and Commenceing, again Housekeeping it takes three or four weeks to settle our minds to new Situations—and domestick Concerns employ a Considerable portion of the attention of good Housekeepers—even if they are favoured with good Servants— thease causes must Constitute my...
Phillips has this moment handed me yours of the 5 th. and I now throw by a Qui tam in which I have been drudging this ½ hour, to thank you for your letter.— Whence comes this Listlessness—this depression of Spirits? What can relax the Elasticity of your Mind? I have often found myself in the same Situation. I felt it yesterday without being able to trace the least Cause. The Connection between...
I believe this is your Birth day, may you have many returns of this Period, encreasing in wisdom knowledge wealth and happiness at every Aniversary. it is a long time since I wrote to you, yet I have not been unmindfull of you I am anxious for your welfare, and Solicitious for your success in Buisness. you must expect however to advance slowly at first and must call to your aid Patience and...
I congratulate you upon your having setled yourself thus far, and am pleasd to find you so well accommodated. you have a good office, a Good Library, and an agreable Family to reside in. be patient and persevering. you will get Buisness in time, and when you feel disposed to find fault with your stars, bethink yourself how preferable your situation to that of many others, and tho a state of...
I received with great Pleasure your Letter of the 9 of August, inclosing a Receipt from Mr Parsons for one hundred Pounds lawful Money, which you paid him in the month of August, Second day, in full for your Tuition as a Clerk in his office for the term of three Years. I learned, with Pleasure also, that on the 9 th of August you took Possession of an office in my house, where I wish you more...
yesterday mr Howard arrived here and brought me Letters from your Brother Thomas, and one from you to Charles— I was rejoiced to find that he was on his way here, as the delay had been the source of a good deal of uneasiness. I am fully of your mind with regard to Thomas, and know that if he studies Law it will be a force to his inclinations. the want of capital I Suppose is one great...
I received by your Brother on fryday last your kind Letter; he did not get here, oweing to contrary winds untill the tenth. he appears to think of the Law, but I fear it is rather from necessity than inclination, and because he finds that his Father is fond of having him study it, and that he does not See any opening in any other buisness. I shall be better able to judge when your Father...
Since my return from Philadelphia where I have been to get Lodgings, against the meeting of Congress, your Mamma has shewn me your Letter: and I consent you Should keep the Horse for the present.— My Brother may Supply you with hay, as far as your occasion for it may go. Can nothing be done to make my Estate at Boston and Braintree more productive? The House where you are is at a miserable...
I wrote you before to day: but I forgot to say Several Things.— Have you ever attended a Town Meeting? You may there learn the Ways of Men, and penetrate Several Characters which otherwise You would not know. There are Several Objects of Enquiry, which I would point out to your consideration without making any noise or parade about them. 1. The State of Parties in Religion, Government Manners,...
I have received and read with great Pleasure, your modest Sensible, judicious and discreet Letter of the 31. of Sept r. The Town of Boston is at present unhappily divided into political Parties, and neither Party I presume has tried Experiments enough upon you to discover to which Side you belong. You might very easily induce either Side to make much of you, by becoming a zealot for it: but my...
Upon my return from Law Society this evening I found my father in my room with a letter in his hand from you to me. He asked me to see what you had written concerning your downfall. Upon opening the letter I soon found what he alluded to, but could find no marks of any downfall That you should have been somewhat confused upon your first exertion was by no means a matter of astonishment to any...
The Note from Piemont, I would not have Sued by any means. Hopkins’s Pretentions I have no Idea of. I Suppose an account with him may be found in my Ledger, But I can Say nothing upon memory. Piemont ought to make out his Account— He says I had a Bar Wig and a Bob Wig of him. If so he should make out his Account and if they amount to as much as the Note, there is an End of the Business. If...
perhaps a few lines from my own Hand may serve to put you more at your ease than an account of my Health from any other person. I have indeed had a very severe sickness in which both Body and mind sufferd, and the care which devolved upon me in consequence of my being in the midst of Removal I found too much for me. the least buisness put me into such a Tremour as would prevent my getting any...
I received your letter of the 29 th Ult o by the last post. The reflections which it raises in my mind are by much too interesting to afford me great pleasure. The anxious path you are now pursuing must soon be trodden by me. A prospect is before me not less clouded than yours and the faint ray of my abilities will not be able so soon to dispel the gloom which obscures the day. I have not the...
Your Brother Charles arrived on Saturday night from New York and has dissipated some of the Gloom of the Family. Your Mother however Seems pretty well recovered from her Indisposition: and Your Brother Thomas, tho very weak is on the Recovery, as We hope. The rest of the Family is well. In a Letter to your mamma, you intimate an Inclination to make Us a Visit. Nothing I assure you would be...
I have received two Letters from you, since my arrival in this city. the sickness of your Brother Thomas must be my excuse for not sooner noticing the first, which I certainly should have done immediatly if your Father had not told me that he had written to you, and particularly answerd that part which proposed a visit to us. I certainly cannot have the least objection but should be most...
I fear that my receiving your letters so late may be some disadvantage to you. The information I shall now give you perhaps may reach you too late. By the last post I received your favor of the 14 th instant and this morning went into town for the one dated the 11 th which Harbach brought. The newspapers before this time must have informed you concerning some of the business you have written...
When I was at Bush Hill this Morning it was my intention to have requested your Company to dine tomorrow at the Presidents, by his desire; but as I did not see you at that time it slipped my recollection, and occasions you the trouble of this letter, which is to make the same request—to which you will be kind enough to give an Answer by the Servant. I am Dear Sir Your most Obedt Servt ALS ,...
owing to an accident your Letter of April 1 t did not reach us till the 14 th I have got the power compleated and inclose it to the dr. I hope your trunk & the Porter which accompanied it came safe to Hand. I put in an article or two upon the top of the Trunk which if any opportunity offers you may send to Braintree. the Porter was directed to the care of mr Smith but I did not as I ought...
we have reachd this place this day, but whether I shall be able to travel tomorrow is uncertain, for I am so unfortunate as to be attackd with the intermitting fever last night was so very ill that I had not the least expectation of being able to proceed on my journey, but to day I am better. I was taken last fryday in N york with it, and prevented sitting out as we intended on monday I am now...
I had not time to write to you before I left Braintree I was in so much trouble for your Aunt and Family, that I left home with a Heavy Heart indeed, nor can I look to Philadelphia with a much lighter one, for there mrs Brisler lies at the point of death with a fever, if living. I promised Lucy if any Letters should come from Gen ll Knox or mr Brisler after I left home that you should open...
Tis a very long time since I wrote to you, or heard from you I have been more engaged in company than is my choice but living in Town has necessarily devolved more of it upon us than heretofore, and tho we have not seen more than in reality we ought to considering our publick Character, yet it is much of an Egyptian task, and fall some times much heavier upon me than my state of health will...
Your Letter of the 4 th , has given me as much Pain by opening the Sceenes of Ambition in your neighbourhood as it has pleasure by the Elegance of its composition and the Intelligence with which it devellopes the Maneuvres of Parties and the Passions of Individuals. Another Drama at New York has been acted with equal Spirit and of more Importance. At Philadelphia too We have had our...
it has been oweing to the multiplicity of business that I have had upon my hands for a forghtnight past that I have omitted giving my Brother earlier information of our intended departure for Europe— we expect to sail in the course of this month— at first we intended going in the March Packett—but found it impossible to get ready we have therefore postponed our departure a few days untill the...
I had the pleasure to receive your kind Letter of the 18 th of May by Barnard and was much releived by being informed that our Mother was recovering her health as rapidly as could be expected— I feared from not having received a Single line from her; that she was not so well as my friends represented her to me we have had Letters from all my other friends except herself since our arrivall and...
As we have some skitish persons in the Family who are apprehensive of the small pox, and of every Body from your infected city, we shall not have the pleasure of your company, nor the office a visit from you this week. your cousin Lucy informd me to day that you had a letter from your sister. pray send it me or such extracts from it as will inform me how she does and the col and Boys. I am...
at 9 last night I arriv’d and this Morning have taken my Seat from whence I write this. I have just rec d yours of 22. Nov. with its Inclosure. I am told most confidently that all the Votes in N. Y. will be for Clinton and all the Votes in Pensilvania for me. I believe neither. If the People of the Union are capable of being influenced by Such Characters as Dallas and Edwards, I should be...
This Letter will be delivered you, by M r Roberdeau a Son of General Roberdeau my ancient Friend, lately married to Miss Blair a Daughter of Doctor Blair, whom your Mamma knows. I pray you to Shew all the Civility to M r Roberdeau in your Power. invite him to Quincy with you to keep sunday with your Mamma and shew him Boston and Cambridge, Colledge Library Apparatus &c and give him all the...
Prince will bring this to you; the inclosed Letters I wish you to direct, the thin Paper, to your Father The other to Thomas; Prince is to return on thursday morg̃ by him send the papers and any Letters which you may have; if the weather should prove pleasent, I shall send a Horse for you on saturday. I have seen the dr since I wrote to you, and talkd with him about the meddow. he thinks that...
I rec d by the last post your favour of the 16. The Votes from New Hampshire to Maryland inclusively have been unanimous excepting the factious Voice of New York, and one D r Johnson of Conecocheague formerly a New Yorker a Particular Friend of M r Clinton and by his own confession under particular Obligations to him. Southward of Chesapeak all are for Clinton except S. C. I thank you for your...
I am again entertained by your kind Letter of the 22. Ult. The Intrigues of M r Clinton M r Burke M r Dallas M r Pierpoint Edwards, &c with Several Members of Congress from Virginia N. C. Georgia and Kentucky aided by Governor Hancock, have given a very odd cast to the Election: but they have Seperated the sheep from the Goats— There must be however more Employment for the Press in favour of...
The Public Papers will inform you that M r Jefferson has resigned and that M r Randolph is appointed Secretary of State. The Attorney General is not yet nominated. M r Lewis M r Lawrence M r Benson M r Gore, M r Potts &c have been mentioned in Conversation. The Motives to M r Jeffersons Resignation are not assigned, and are left open to the Conjectures of a Speculating World. I also am a...
Although your modesty would not inform Us, of your commencement as a Faneuil Hall Orator, it is impossible to conceal from the Public so important an Event, when there are 500 talkative noisy Witnesses of it, and accordingly it has come to me from an Eye and Ear Witness, as I suppose, your young Friend Breck. I rejoice that you have taken the Unpopular Side of the Questions concerning...
I have great Satisfaction in your Letter of the 10 th. The Breaking of the Bubble of Banks would be a Blessing if it could teach our People to beware of all other Bubbles. But I fear We shall have a Succession of them. I hope however at least they will teach you caution. “The Rivalries of our most conspicuous Characters” are such as human Nature produces under the Cultivation of such a...
I received the copies of your Oration by M r Atkinson for which I give you my own and the thanks of my friends Unwilling to trust my own partial judgment upon the performance I have endeavored to collect the opinions of those of my friends here who are most remarkable for their taste and my own ideas have been justified by the universal applause which has been bestowed upon your Oration. I...
Congress have rec d from the President all the Negotiations with France and England as well as those with the Indians. On Monday We expect those with Spain and all the Intelligence rec d respecting the Algerines. The whole forming a System of Information which Shews our dear Country to be in a critical Situation. So critical that the most sanguine are constrained to pauze and consider. The...
I inclose to you your Brothers Letter I should have Sent for you last saturday but I expected a snow storm. I suppose your Father has written to you. he is vex’d with the Printer for Publishing in three Numbers what ought all to have been in one. he says the writer of Columbus had better publish in a pamphlet by which a printer may get money, and as pamphlets are much in vogue at present....
I wish you to direct the inclosed Letter—to your Father I read Barnevelt in Mondays paper. it may be necessary to defend himself, but I look upon his opponent in a contemtable light, and that no honour or reputation is to be obtaind in a contest with him. I therefore wish to see Barnevelt close Your Father is really affraid that columbus may be inflated with vanity and too much emboldened. he...