Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 51-60 of 212 sorted by editorial placement
I have had the pleasure to receive several of your letters and have regularly delivered the inclosures as you requested. The bill which you inclosed I gave to Major Russel for publication his paper being first published after the receipt of your letter—The same bill had been published in the Palladium several days and however ruinous its provisions might be to the peace and commercial interest...
A letter of yours, aged three months and eight days, which has lain unobserved, during all this time in the cover of another letter in my pocket Book has just fallen out upon me, like Yorick’s sermon, from Stevinus, upon the Corporal where I was looking, not after “Prince Maurice’s sailing chariot,” but after something altogether as unlike the result of my search. It is never too late to be...
I send you the enclosed which I recieved two days since and should not have delayed so long had I not been in hourly expectation of hearing from you. The children are both pretty well. John is about more teeth and suffers a little with his gums but is as fat as ever, my own health is so indifferent I shall certainly wean him next month. I have not yet heard of an opportunity to send the Trunks...
I recieved your very kind letter and was rejoiced to hear that you had arrived safe at New York as I was a little apprehensive Patty might occasion you some trouble on the road. I am extremely glad she performed her journey so well. It is painful to me to renew the subject of our last letters but I cannot suffer you to suppose that I remained here from choice had I had the slightest prospect...
I recieved your letter my best friend the day before yesterday which afforded me much pleasure as it assured me of your safe arrival at home I know not but it appear’d to me that your letter were not in good spirits when you last wrote you do not say you are well and I fear the fatigue of your journey has proved injurious rather than serviceable beneficial I had 20 Cents to pay Postage for...
I write you again my beloved friend in the greatest anxiety to hear from you as I fear’d from your last letter that you were unwell since last Sunday I have not heard from you and though I cannot flatter myself you can devote more than one half hour in a week to me yet I no sooner recieve one letter than I anxiously look forward to the time in which I think it probable I may recieve another...
I recieved your Kind favour of the 24th Yesterday morning never did a letter prove more welcome as I had suffer’d a great degree of anxiety at not hearing from you it is three weeks since the date of your last and I was very apprehensive your had been prevented from writing by indisposition I am wretched if you do not write me once a week at least to inform of your health—It is perhaps fancy...
I recieved your favor of the 3d three days since it gave me real pleasure as you appear to be in good spirits and write much more cheerfully than you have done some time past— I was much surprized at the change you mention in Mrs. Whitcombs person she wrote Caroline she had been unwell but I did not think she had been seriously sick— I have just done reading Madame de Staal’s new Novel which...
I sieze the earliest opportunity of answering your very kind letter of the 9th which I did not recieve untill friday evening owing to a of violent Storm of Thunder and Lightning and the heaviest Rain ever Known in this part of the Country by which the roads have been so much injured that the Mail was delayed one day I never witness any thing like it Mrs. Hellen who continues in a very weak...
I recieved your very kind favors of the 14th 20th & 24th. on Friday & Saturday & Should certainly not have delayed answering them so long had I not been prevented by a severe attack of the Spasms attended with a considerable degree of Fever which have tormented me these three days. I am pretty well to day and certainly one should not complain as though the Spasms were very violent they were...