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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I received last night your favour of the fourth, with the Letter inclosed Although I am not able to conjecture, in what manner it can possibly be of any consequence to any one, to prove that in the Year 1777 I argued a cause with Mr Lowell for Col Doane at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, before Judge Brackett, yet as Judge Bourne considers it material to him, I have no hesitation in certifying...
I ought, before now, to have acknowledged the Receipt of your favours and even now I can do no more than acknowledge them, for what Subject have I for a Letter? Shall I Send you diagrams of my Grounds, which the fine Weather of November and December has enabled me me to plough, for Corn, Potatoes, Barley Clover and Timothy? But what a Miniature picture of a Lilliputian Plantation, would Six...
The 11th. of September is reckoned among the happiest days of my Life. The Navy Officers who composed the late Court Martial on Capt. Little came out to visit me, with Mr Shaw who brought me your favor of the 4th dated at Philadelphia, informing me of your arrival on that day with my Daughter and Grandson in as good health as could be expected—You do not expressly say whether you intend to...
Livy in his 42. Book and chapters 29 and thirty, as an introduction of his History of the War between the Romans and Perseus King of Macedonia, says that all the Kings and States of Europe and Asia had their Attention fixed upon those two powerfull Nations upon the Point of engaging in War. He first explains the Views of the Kings Eumenes, Prusias, Ariarathes, Antiochus, Ptolomy, Massinissa,...
Your luminous Letter of the 27th of Feb. and 6. March are is before me. Was this an homogenious Nation under a consolidated Government, the Provision in the Constitution of Massachusetts would be Sufficient. But in a Confederation like ours there is danger. In Holland they have thought unanimity necessary in all most every Thing. Under our old Confederation, a Concurrence of nine States out of...
Many Thanks for your favor of the Eleventh. It is very odd, but no less true that I not only never Saw, Mr Bentley, but I never heard of his fame or name, till I read his Election as Chaplain in a Newspaper. Since that time I have heard much, and among other things that he is an intimate Friend of James Winthrop the Judge. Mr Bowdoins appointment is the best, the President has made in this...
I have not written to you, though I have received two kind Letters from you, Since your departure, giving me very pleasing accounts of your comforts in your Travels. Soon after you left Us, I took the resolution instead of Sending George to Atkinson by the Stage or any other accidental and precarious conveyance to convey him myself. Accordingly We Set out, your Mother your Son and myself, and...
I thank you for my Letter from N.Y and the Pamplet inclosed. Commodore Morris’s Defence contains Information which appears to be wanted by our President and all his Ministers, by his senators and Representatives, by his Officers and Men of his Navy, and by the commercial Citizens of our Country. To be sure to protect the Commerce and Seamen in the Atlantic and Mediterranean and blockade...
Your favour of Decr. 24. was received in the regular course of the Mail and in good order. It refreshes me to See that you write in good Spirits. Your Family and private Friends must console you, under all your humiliations in public Life. For fifteen years, i.e from the year 1760 to 1775 I was in the Valley, the dark Valley of Grief Gloom and disappointment; Unalterably devoted to Principles...
Knowing very well by too long Experience the nature of your Employment, I wish you to understand that I never expect or desire any answers to my Letters except when I expressly request Information, more than a bare Acknowledgment of the Recipt of them. I Say this however upon a very patriotic and Self denying Principle because every Line from you is a cordial to my Spirit. Mr John Smith of...
As I know you hold a higher Rank in the intellectual Scale and a more estimable Situation in the moral Gradations of the Universe than Admiral Nelson, I know of no reason why I should not borrow his Fathers Epithets and for once or twice bestow them upon you. I, who perhaps ought to be indifferent to all Things in this World, and certainly Should conscientiously resign all Men Measures and...
House Barn and Land 10 Acres 2000 } 6500 108. House Barns and Land bought of my Brother with the Additn 3000 House & Land bought of Wm Vesey 1500 24 Place formerly Deacon Belchers 2250 6 Six Acres formerly Col Quincys 700 9 Nine Acres of Pasture on Penns Hill— 270
I have regularly received the Journals and Documents you have been So good as to inclose and two Short Letters for which I thank you. I have recd also the Economica of Mr Blodget for which I pray you to thank him. It is I presume a work of merit and Utility. I have not been able as yet to attend to it very carefully. I have not written to you before, because I had nothing to write, unless it...
We feel, my dear Sir the Want of your Society on sundays and hope the Weather and Roads will soon bless us with it. Never at the Age of 18 when I was a great Reader and Admirer of Tragedies did I take more pleasure in them, than I have lately in Reading La Harps and of Corneille Racine Voltaire Moliere La Fontaine &c did not mean to express a Wish that you should make a serious study of Greek...
I received your favour of the 24 of Jan. this morning. I must repeat to you that I neither expect nor desire that you should answer my Letters. I write for my own Amusement and on a Supposition at the same time that a little diversion from your Studies and Labours might give a little pleasure. Neither you nor the Gentlemen who commonly vote with you, ought to discard your concern relative to...
In Answer to your Letter of the 27 of January I request you to make Provision for Advancing me, by Mr Shaw one thousand one hundred and twenty five dollars and fifty Cents, or thereabout, which is the amount of an Obligation I owe to Miss Thaxter, or if you choose and I think there is but one remaining due to that Family. Your Mother has written you on the Subject of Caucus’s. I am not of her...
I am all impatience to hear from you, my beloved friend, and cannot concieve the reason, of your not having written from New York, according to your promise. there are some reports about that have occasioned me some much uneasiness and I wish very much to learn, that our friends there are all well , not a line having been recieved here. I have sent your Bank book, &c, as you desired, and have...
I enclose two letters my be loved friend which I request you will give to Adelaide I have not recieved your promissed letter I will not say that I anticipate much pleasure from its perusal as I think it is an answer to a letter I wrote you which has caused me much regret still to hear from you at all affords me so much real satisfaction. I anxiously await its arrival firmly convinced that you...
My health continues to mend rappidly and the prospect of soon rejoining you and my little darlings supports my spirits and enables me to bear the dreadful stroke that has befallen me with more fortitude than otherwise I fear I should have done— I can safely assure you that this misfortune was not caused by any imprudence on my part Dr. Weems is satisfied that the Child had been subject to...
I recieved your last very kind letter two days since and return you many thanks for your verses the idea is extremely beautiful and I should be much delighted to see it dressed in some other form by you I do not admire the versification at present whatever you do write must be more grateful to me than the best piece that ever was penned— I followed the multitude today and went to pay my...
Mr Gurney having called on me yesterday, to give notice that he should quit your house next quarter day, and that he wished to settle with you as soon as possible, I have thought it best to write you my beloved friend, he having expressed a desire to leave it immediately, which I did not think you would approved; he mention’d not having it in his power to pay you at present, but will give you...
I have this moment recieved your kind letter my best friend it has removed a load of anxiety from my heart which was becoming almost insupportable I wrote you yesterday that I was well to day I am even better as my mind is at ease your letter laid two days in the Cambridge post office which accounts for the unusual delay— The Death of Col. Wythe was attended with the most horrid circumstances...
Your letters Profiles & Money have arrived safe for which I return my thanks It is true I felt severely disappointed at not finding yours among them but I endeavour’d to console myself with the transporting idea of soon possessing the dear original and every regret vanished in the sweet anticipation of our approaching meeting— I wrote you that you might possibly be at a Wedding & in the course...
I am rejoiced my best friend to find by your last that you have at length recieved one of my letters your anxiety must have been great but I flatter myself that you know me too well to have suspected me of negligence I every hour feel your absence more, sensibly and shall most heartily happy when the period arrives which is to restore you to us three long months must yet elapse before I can...
I recieved your very kind letter and was rejoiced to hear that you had arrived safe at New York as I was a little apprehensive Patty might occasion you some trouble on the road. I am extremely glad she performed her journey so well. It is painful to me to renew the subject of our last letters but I cannot suffer you to suppose that I remained here from choice had I had the slightest prospect...
I recieved your letter my best friend the day before yesterday which afforded me much pleasure as it assured me of your safe arrival at home I know not but it appear’d to me that your letter were not in good spirits when you last wrote you do not say you are well and I fear the fatigue of your journey has proved injurious rather than serviceable beneficial I had 20 Cents to pay Postage for...
I was so much fatigued from my journey that I found it impossible to write by Whitcomb he will tell you how very much the poor baby suffered and I hope it will be an inducement for you to come and fetch us as I really feel that George will be almost too great a charge for me alone he has quite recovered his fatigue and looks as well as ever the meeting with my friends was almost too much for...
I should have answered your very affectionate letter by this days post had I not been confined by one of my fits of the cramps &c. which owing to the fatigue of my journey and the unusual agitation of my spirits was attended with a considerable degree of fever I am however much better today and should be perfectly well if it was not for my hands which are extremely painful it is a return of...
At length I am able to answer your kind letter of the sixteenth our dear Baby has been extremely ill the last three or four days cutting teeth he was so bad yesterday we were considerably alarmed but I thank God he is much better to day and two of the teeth are through I never in my life saw a Child suffer so much I hope he will not have any more untill the cold weather sets in— The Alert is...
Last night I recieved your kind favour of the 19th & 22d I was sure the melancholy circumstance which so lately took place would occasion great consternation in your part of the World It is indeed most dreadful & I think every one who values his life should be extremely careful how he expresses his sentiments on almost any subject particularly at this moment when people appear to be on the...
I recieved your Kind favour of the 24th Yesterday morning never did a letter prove more welcome as I had suffer’d a great degree of anxiety at not hearing from you it is three weeks since the date of your last and I was very apprehensive your had been prevented from writing by indisposition I am wretched if you do not write me once a week at least to inform of your health—It is perhaps fancy...
Tomorrow week being the 1st. March I presume this must be the last letter I address to you at Washington supposing you will set off on your journey home the earliest opportunity after the Session closes— I yesterday recieved your favor of the 9th. and was rejoiced to find that you supported the extreme severity of the Cold with so much philosophy Poor Quincy, what would he have done here when...
I last night recieved your letters of the 10 and 13 together and the extreme satisfaction of learning that your long silence was not caused by any new misfortune and that your health and that of our dear children was good. Your mother and, Sister Smith both wrote me last week who writes in better spirits than I expected. I am not surprizedat any thing Yrujo does. He has every reason to think...
To offer you, the kindest wishes of the season, my best friend, is almost unnecessary; my happiness, & felicity, in this world, is so interwoven with yours, that I fondly believe, the one cannot be sensible of a joy, or a pain, which is not sincerely participated by the other. To say that I hope each revolving year, may produce additional felicity, is poorly to express describe my feelings;...
I wait with the utmost impatience for a letter from you as I am extremely anxious to hear of your safe arrival and likewise to know something about your future plans as it regards my return home I have recieved a very polite invitation from your mother to Quincey but as I am very desirous of bringing one of my sisters home with me I have hesitated about the answer I will candidly own to you...
We return’d to Town yesterday morning which was one of the most bitter Cold I ever experienced but fortunately were not frozen The Children bore the ride better than I expected though George could not refrain from tears nothing contributed so much towards producing a free circulation as the sight of Mr. Shaw with a letter from you my beloved friend written apparently in great spirits and...
I arrived here yesterday after a very fatiguing journey but find my health tolerably good Your Sister is in charming health and spirits and I think looks better than I ever saw her Capt Hull on his arrival here recieved new orders and is uncertain about going on to Newport however as Mrs Smith insists on our staying here untill after Commencement I hope we shall if he should not proceed be...
I have impatiently waited for letters, my best friend, having recieved none, since last Thursday I sincerely lament, having mentioned Georges Cough. which though it still continues, will I fervently hope, not be attended with any bad consequences. I take every possible precaution to prevent it, and by Dr. Welsh’s advice, do not suffer him to go out of the House, unless the weather is very...
I recieved your very kind letter of the 3d on Sunday evening & was inexpressibly shocked at the melancholy news it contain’d. Poor Mrs: Sargent. I most sincerely sympathize with you my beloved friend in grief for her early death. Amiable & lovely as she was every one who has seen her must deplore her loss, but you my best friend who have known her so long and once loved her so well must indeed...
Having arrived thus far safely my best friend I write you a few lines merely to inform you that I have borne the journey much better than I could possibly have expected though I find myself unable to proceed as rappidly as I wished we arrived here this morning at two o clock Came by Water from Baltimore with 60 passengers in the Newcastle Packett all Irish just arrived in this Country We left...
I am much disappointed at your Sisters not having accompanied you to Boston, having flatter’d myself with a hope that her society would have proven a great compensation for the loss of your wife and Children but I admire her resolution it was almost impossible for her to leave the Col. at so critical a period of his affairs—Mr. Hellen who is again in Baltimore return’d last Sunday and staid...
The extreme anxiety you appear to suffer, my best friend, causes me great uneasiness; you have alarmed yourself unnecessarily for George, his cough appears to have affected his Lungs considerably, but he has no fever, his appetite is good, and his spirits equally so, he does not lose flesh. Dr. Welsh reccomended his not being exposed to the air, because the weather was excessively severe, and...
Assured that a few lines from me will be acceptable to my best beloved friend on his arrival I seize the earliest opportunity of enquiring after his health and giving the pleasing information of the return to health of our darling Children Poor Kitty is suffers severely for her imprudence she has a large Blister on her side and though not absolutely confined to her Bed it almost amounts to it...
I recieved your favor of the 12th last night and was very much greived to learn that you were so unwell do not I entreat you my beloved friend suffer yourself to despair our little darling has it is true been most allarmingly ill during the greatest part of the Summer but but I thank God he is perfectly recover’d and growing quite fat I thought I had taken the greatest precaution when writing...
I send you enclosed a couple of Profiles one of which I wish you to present to Mrs. Adams if you think they it will prove acceptable I am told mine is a very fine likeness and Caroline who likewise takes this opportunity of offering one to your mother has I think been equally fortunate the other you can keep or give to Mrs. Whitcomb if you do not want it they were taken by a Mr. Todd, a...
I send you enclosed the bill of Lading & Key of your Trunks which I suppose will have arrived in Boston when you recieve this letter— I drank tea the night before last at Mrs Pichons their little Boy is very sick P. is really recalled but does not quit this country untill next spring Mr. & Mrs. Bonaparte are gone but from what I heard a few evenings she is not likely to meet with a very...
As I know no subject is half so agreeable to you as the Children, I hasten to write you, that they are well, that George attends pretty steadily to his french, though with some reluctance, and John goes to school and is very anxious to overtake George in French, that Papa may bring him a horse. the School Mistress is much delighted with John, she is Cousin to Miss Hanah Adams Mr. T Greenleaf...
Your letter of the 6th and the enclosures, arrived safe last evening. I was a little surprized at your appearing so angry at the observations made in my letter. I merely meant to insinuate that by now & then addressing her particularly in conversation, and leading her to partake of it, she would feel herself highly flatter’d. this my testy friend was all I required, and you must really think...
I have not recieved a line from friend since you enclosed your very beautiful whom I permitted to read them pleaded so fervently for permission to publish them in his Anthology I could not withstand his entreaty and suffer’d him to have them, you will I am sure if this is a fault on my part excuse it for the goodness of the motive The Children are well, John has been to school to day. I ran...
I recieved your kind favor of the 31st on Friday Evening with the Bill enclosed for which I return you many thanks I am rejoiced to hear that you Garden affords you so much amusement and hope to find it in high order against next summer I think if you intend to make any alterations in the House as there is nobody at present residing there it would be better to have them done this Summer We...