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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Your letter of the 6th and the enclosures, arrived safe last evening. I was a little surprized at your appearing so angry at the observations made in my letter. I merely meant to insinuate that by now & then addressing her particularly in conversation, and leading her to partake of it, she would feel herself highly flatter’d. this my testy friend was all I required, and you must really think...
The extreme anxiety you appear to suffer, my best friend, causes me great uneasiness; you have alarmed yourself unnecessarily for George, his cough appears to have affected his Lungs considerably, but he has no fever, his appetite is good, and his spirits equally so, he does not lose flesh. Dr. Welsh reccomended his not being exposed to the air, because the weather was excessively severe, and...
I have regularly received the Journals and Documents you have been So good as to inclose and two Short Letters for which I thank you. I have recd also the Economica of Mr Blodget for which I pray you to thank him. It is I presume a work of merit and Utility. I have not been able as yet to attend to it very carefully. I have not written to you before, because I had nothing to write, unless it...
I have impatiently waited for letters, my best friend, having recieved none, since last Thursday I sincerely lament, having mentioned Georges Cough. which though it still continues, will I fervently hope, not be attended with any bad consequences. I take every possible precaution to prevent it, and by Dr. Welsh’s advice, do not suffer him to go out of the House, unless the weather is very...
To offer you, the kindest wishes of the season, my best friend, is almost unnecessary; my happiness, & felicity, in this world, is so interwoven with yours, that I fondly believe, the one cannot be sensible of a joy, or a pain, which is not sincerely participated by the other. To say that I hope each revolving year, may produce additional felicity, is poorly to express describe my feelings;...
Your letters of 17th 18th 19th were brought me on Friday, the information they contain’d, must plead my apology, my best friend, for not writing immediately, but the Shock was so great, I felt totally incapacitated for the exertion, which it required. Your Mother & Father came to see us yesterday, having hear’d of our loss. Alas my beloved friend, three times in the last twelve months, as it...
The trial of Mr. Selfridge begun on Tuesday last and finished on Friday. I attended nearly the whole time and as it may be some time before the trial will be published, it may be interesting to you to learn some of the particulars from a Spectator. The evidence on the part of the Defendant was opened by Mr: Gore in a very handsome style and the law as applicable to the facts which he expected...
Th: Jefferson requests the favour of Mr. Adams to dine with him on Wednesday the 31st . at half after three, The favour of an answer is asked. MHi : Adams Papers.
I last evening recieved your almost unkind letter which was brought me by your brother & Mr Shaw the latter came to town to attend Selfridges trial which I understand commenced yesterday he looks very well and says our friends in Quincy are all in good health I have not seen them since my residence in Town Caleb is so bad a driver they cannot send for us I am really hurt at the stile of your...
I this morning recieved your favor of the 12 which afforded me the satisfaction of knowing that you were well & regret very sincerely the strange remissness of the Mails for which I can no way account— I made my first payment to Mr. Gulliver as you directed. Mr. Shaw inform’d me to day he should bring me the money from Mr. Bradford in the course of a Week he is so much occupied in attending...
I am rejoiced my best friend to find by your last that you have at length recieved one of my letters your anxiety must have been great but I flatter myself that you know me too well to have suspected me of negligence I every hour feel your absence more, sensibly and shall most heartily happy when the period arrives which is to restore you to us three long months must yet elapse before I can...
I have just recieved your letter of the 5, my beloved friend, and can only lament, that the extreme irregularity of the Mails, should have caused you unnecessary anxiety. I have written to you twice, and trust ere this, your mind is perfectly at ease on our account. I am sorry however, to be obliged to tell you, that George has a very bad Cough, and that I am very unwell with a Sore Throat,...
The enclosed Letter from my Son mentions a Law Case that was Reported in the National Intelligencer. As you take that Paper I would thank you to look it up for me, as it may be of use in the Suit now depending. I am, with Compliments to Mrs. Adams, your obliged Friend and Uncle— Please to return my Son’s Letter. MHi : Adams Papers.
I am all impatience to hear from you, my beloved friend, and cannot concieve the reason, of your not having written from New York, according to your promise. there are some reports about that have occasioned me some much uneasiness and I wish very much to learn, that our friends there are all well , not a line having been recieved here. I have sent your Bank book, &c, as you desired, and have...
As I know no subject is half so agreeable to you as the Children, I hasten to write you, that they are well, that George attends pretty steadily to his french, though with some reluctance, and John goes to school and is very anxious to overtake George in French, that Papa may bring him a horse. the School Mistress is much delighted with John, she is Cousin to Miss Hanah Adams Mr. T Greenleaf...
I arrived here yesterday after a very fatiguing journey but find my health tolerably good Your Sister is in charming health and spirits and I think looks better than I ever saw her Capt Hull on his arrival here recieved new orders and is uncertain about going on to Newport however as Mrs Smith insists on our staying here untill after Commencement I hope we shall if he should not proceed be...
Having arrived thus far safely my best friend I write you a few lines merely to inform you that I have borne the journey much better than I could possibly have expected though I find myself unable to proceed as rappidly as I wished we arrived here this morning at two o clock Came by Water from Baltimore with 60 passengers in the Newcastle Packett all Irish just arrived in this Country We left...
I last night recieved your letters of the 10 and 13 together and the extreme satisfaction of learning that your long silence was not caused by any new misfortune and that your health and that of our dear children was good. Your mother and, Sister Smith both wrote me last week who writes in better spirits than I expected. I am not surprizedat any thing Yrujo does. He has every reason to think...
Accept my best beloved friend the sincere congratulations of your wife whose prayers are humbly offered to the author of all good for your happiness and to grant you many many happy returns of this day that it may be the last which we may pass in affliction and separated— This day poor little Archibald was consign’d to the earth close by our dear little babe and poor Boyd and his wife are in...
I sympathize with you in the loss you have sustained, and rejoice that the event did not prove fatal to the mother, as well as Child. Let me hear from you when you get a Letter from Washington. your affectionate MHi : Adams Papers.
I last night recieved your truely tender and kind letter words cannot describe the feelings with which I read it my heart swelled with gratitude and love and I almost ceased to think the stroke so bitter which proved to me how dear I am to your heart. Your plan is so perfectly agreeable that I beg you will take the house and if possible have it prepared and my Children with you by the time I...
I have this moment recieved your kind letter my best friend it has removed a load of anxiety from my heart which was becoming almost insupportable I wrote you yesterday that I was well to day I am even better as my mind is at ease your letter laid two days in the Cambridge post office which accounts for the unusual delay— The Death of Col. Wythe was attended with the most horrid circumstances...
My health continues to mend rappidly and the prospect of soon rejoining you and my little darlings supports my spirits and enables me to bear the dreadful stroke that has befallen me with more fortitude than otherwise I fear I should have done— I can safely assure you that this misfortune was not caused by any imprudence on my part Dr. Weems is satisfied that the Child had been subject to...
I still continue as well and better than we could reasonably expect my best beloved friend and shall write two or three lines merely to announce this I know to you pleasing intelligence. My milk as yet gives me no trouble and I hope I shall escape without the usual difficulties and I have had no fever whatever My time was a very bad one and lasted 20 hours Twelve hours more would have...
To hear from you and to write you are the greatest pleasures I am at present capable of enjoying and even this is in a great measure restricted by the almost total loss of the use of my thumb which I fear will yet teaze me three long weeks my sincere desire to prevent your feeling any uneasiness on my account urges me to use every possible exertion and I must rely on your indulgence for every...
Your kind letter and deed came safe to hand last evening and I immediately sent to beg Mr Cochran to come as Doctor Thornton was out of Town owing to a bad gust this gentleman disappointed me and I find by the Laws of the State here it is necessary to go before two Justices which I intend least there should be any objection hereafter I am no great judge but it appears to me that you have sold...
I write you a few lines although with difficulty having been for some days extremely ill and still remaining too unwell to be able to attend to anything my illness was I believe occasion’d by walking though a very small distance and nearly threaten’d a premature confinement I am so much better that I trust I have escaped the danger and make no doubt I shall get through very well your charming...
The pleasure I recieved on reading your account of our charming Children my best beloved friend you can more readily concieve than I describe I can believe that George grows like me but Johns round face and deep dimples must I think be infinitely more like his father who has ever been celebrated for this to me fascinating beauty the delight I feel at learning that they still talk of me is...
I am much disappointed at your Sisters not having accompanied you to Boston, having flatter’d myself with a hope that her society would have proven a great compensation for the loss of your wife and Children but I admire her resolution it was almost impossible for her to leave the Col. at so critical a period of his affairs—Mr. Hellen who is again in Baltimore return’d last Sunday and staid...
When Mr. Hall was here your Father told him that he would leave to you the adjustment of the shares in the cannal. the Sale of them was undoubtedly a great Sacrifice of property at their present valueSo was the payment of the assesments. but I hope it will prove for the best. Your Father says that he would have you take as of his Shares in the New England Insurence as will repay you what you...
I last night recieved your kind letter from Quincy but was much mortified at the very slight mention you make of the Children I expected you would have written very fully as to their growth and every alteration which has taken place since my departure and feel more than half disappointed at John’s not knowing you although it was unreasonable to expect he should. You can readily imagine with...
After a couple of days of anxious solicitude 1 last night recieved your very affectionate letter from New York which revived my half drooping spirits by affording me the delightful certainty of your being in health and having arrived thus far in safety— I am rejoiced to hear that the Col. still supports his misfortune with cheerfulness and sincerely wish he may yet find a more pleasing...
The Bearer of this Mr. Edward Dartnell will do Mr. Samuel G. Ogden and myself the honor of presenting to you our memorials, addressed to The Senate and House of Representatives, fully stating the circumstances, relative to General Miranda’s visit to the Caraccas, who sailed from this Port in the Ship Leander on the second day of February last,—a Copy is also addressed to Colo. Quincey of the...
Supposing that you will be at Washington long enough to receive a letter from this place before your departure I shall venture to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 19th: ult: to inform you of the health of both your children, as also of your friends at Quincy, who are looking with pleasure for your return, and who hope the cause of your leaving your wife behind you will terminate in...
my son John graduates at this College the next Commencement—I am so occupied and shall continue so for some time to come, in the final arrangement of my affairs, that I shall not be able, and sufficiently composed, to give him the aid that he may require, in composing an English oration for him to deliver on that day— Will you do me the favour to write one on such a subject, as will instruct,...
By your letter of the 26th inst. just received, I am first informed of the appointment of Peter A Schenck, as Surveyor of this port. My enemies have long been struggling to remove me from this office. But I never supposed the President of the United States and Mr Madison capable of uniting with them for my destruction— If they had waited the public examination of the affair relative to the...
I was much pleased at receiving your Letter of March 14th. It was a much longer interval than had occured before, without receiving a line from you. but Mrs Quincys kindness in always mentioning you to my sister had relieved me from the fears that you might be sick. it is with Sincere Satisfaction that I learn from your own hand that your Health is much mended. When a Man enjoys good Health,...
I am informed that Mr. P. A Schenk is nominated as Surveyor of this port, and of course I am to be superceeded as is expressed in the public papers, for my secret connection with Genl. Miranda can it be possible that I am to be condemned unheard—Will my frinds in the Senate consent that I shall be sacrificed & my Wife and Children deprived of bread, to shelter men in higher station for their...
I fear your Father may have given you unnecessary anxiety; I told him at the time it was not best to mention an indisposition so slight as John’s was, but he said if he wrote; he must tell all. I had observed for several days about noon a high coulour in his cheeks, and at that time, he was unusually irritable, Some other Symptoms indicated a redundancy of Bile, which proved to be the case....
My Exordium must inform you that George is and has been a long time in perfect health. John has been as plump and gay and hardy and hearty as you could wish him, till yesterday when he looked a little paler or rather a little less ruddy than usual but he worked and played as usual all day: but this morning he discovered symptoms of qualms in his stomack and puked a little, but a Tea Spoonfull...
I begin my Letter by announcing the Health of your Children, that your mind and that of their Mothers may be at ease & “they cannot speak for themselves it is true,” but there are Mothers who are not less anxious for those who can speak for themselves; and it is with much pain that I learn from your Friends that your Health does not appear to have been mended by your journey, or change of...
In the first place, I must, in conformity with one of the rules ordained by you orators, endeavour to conciliate the affections of my reader, by quieting your Anxiety for your Children, which I can do with a good conscience by assuring you that George and John are in very good health and very fine Spirits. My Sheet would not hold the history of their Studies, their Sports and frolicks. In the...
The Mail of yesterday brought, me, the Documents and in the Evening I received from Boston your favour of the 14th. By the Journals of the Senate I see, that you have Work enough, to excuse you from private Correspondences. By all that I read in the Documents, Journals, and Newspapers, it seems to me that the reigning Principle is to crouch to france & Spain and be very terrible to Britain....
This is the first Snow which we have had of any concequence; and this promisses to be keep. It began last night and has continued increasing all day. It is now mid day, and the storm is cold and severe, the wind North. I cannot tell you how the Glass stands, for when I went in the absence of your Brother & Sister; to take an observation as I promissed, the window was frozen down So tight, that...
Th: Jefferson requests the favour of Mr. & Mrs. Adams. to dine with him on Saturday the 4th. Jany. at half after three. The favour of an answer is asked. MHi : Adams Papers.
I ought, before now, to have acknowledged the Receipt of your favours and even now I can do no more than acknowledge them, for what Subject have I for a Letter? Shall I Send you diagrams of my Grounds, which the fine Weather of November and December has enabled me me to plough, for Corn, Potatoes, Barley Clover and Timothy? But what a Miniature picture of a Lilliputian Plantation, would Six...
I began a Letter to you on the 10 of this Month left it unfinishd, and so it is like to remain, an old Letter being of no more value than an old almanack—for to know how things are, when absent from the Scene, is better than to learn how they were a week before. At that period I had not heard of your safe arrival at Washington. Since I have received two Letters, one dated the 29st Novbr and...
I hope before this reaches Washington you will have arrived there and found your friends well and happy. I have received of Delisle & Dexter the rents which were due amounting to three hundred and seventy dollars and have paid Mr. Thayer as you will see by the inclosed receipt three hundred & fifty adding to which twenty dollars received as the dividend leave in my possession forty dollars for...
Th: Jefferson request the favour of Mr Adams to dine with him on Monday the 9th. instant—Dinner will be on the table precisely at sun:set— The favour of an Answer is asked MHi : Adams Papers.
The reason that you did not receive a Letter from me when you arrived at Philadelphia, was oweing to my being so sick that I could not write. I got your Brother to write, but not so soon as I should, if I had been able. as soon as I could hold my pen I wrote you a few lines, since which I have received your Letter from Newyork; I have rejoiced in the fine weather which has followed you ever...