Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 212 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Within the course of the last week, I have had the pleasure to receive your favors of the 20th: 27th: & 30th: of December, number’s 19-20-21. of the Series, which wants only No 18 to be complete. The interest, which your letters never fail to excite, has been abundantly testified by the eagerness, with which subscriptions to the Port folio, have been sent forward, from every part of the...
Your Letter of march the 10th is before me; your Brother informs me that he has one of April. It is true my dear Son, that I have read with much interest, and Sincere pleasure, your Letters to your Brother Thomas, and with many others, have been highly entertaind with your journey into Silicia. Whilst those letters convey usefull information, to the Merchant, the Mechanic, and the Farmer, they...
I have just received from the Department of State your favor of February 24th: enclosing No 26. of the series. My last number, goes by duplicate to England, under cover to Mr: King; with that, you will receive a particular acknowledgment of all the letters received from you, for three months past, and I cannot but hope, that you may find one of the copies, either at Hamburg or in London, prior...
The 11th. of September is reckoned among the happiest days of my Life. The Navy Officers who composed the late Court Martial on Capt. Little came out to visit me, with Mr Shaw who brought me your favor of the 4th dated at Philadelphia, informing me of your arrival on that day with my Daughter and Grandson in as good health as could be expected—You do not expressly say whether you intend to...
Welcome, welcome, my dear Son to your native Land after a seven years absence from it. God be praised that you and Louissa, and my dear John George &c have arrived in Safety, but I have trembled for you, least the extreem Heat you must have experienced Since your arrival should be too much for you all. The Sudden change we have experienced of no less than 30 degrees, is equally trying to weak...
I was so much fatigued from my journey that I found it impossible to write by Whitcomb he will tell you how very much the poor baby suffered and I hope it will be an inducement for you to come and fetch us as I really feel that George will be almost too great a charge for me alone he has quite recovered his fatigue and looks as well as ever the meeting with my friends was almost too much for...
I should have answered your very affectionate letter by this days post had I not been confined by one of my fits of the cramps &c. which owing to the fatigue of my journey and the unusual agitation of my spirits was attended with a considerable degree of fever I am however much better today and should be perfectly well if it was not for my hands which are extremely painful it is a return of...
I wait with the utmost impatience for a letter from you as I am extremely anxious to hear of your safe arrival and likewise to know something about your future plans as it regards my return home I have recieved a very polite invitation from your mother to Quincey but as I am very desirous of bringing one of my sisters home with me I have hesitated about the answer I will candidly own to you...
I recieved your very kind letter late last night and hasten to answer it although I have already written by this post. You need be under no apprehension about your dear Boy as it is impossible for a child to be in better health and the terrible eruption proved to be nothing more than bug bites he has taken his weaning like a little hero and continues to grow very stout and hearty I talk to him...
I write you a few lines merely to mention that George is perfectly well and that I am almost tired of our seperation and extremely anxious to see you. I must draw upon you for the sum of twenty dollars as I have been obliged to purchace mourning on account of the death of Mrs. Hellen the Mother of Nancy’s husband the family all very anxious to see you papas not at all well. Adieu believe me /...
I have just now received your favor of the 28th. ult. with the enclosures; Dennie stepp’d in a moment after, and I gave him the fables, for which he thanks you. He desires me to add, that as he cannot expect, from your present, unsettled State, you will have much time to bestow in producing original matter, he will be grateful for any thing you may send him, from your stock on hand. I was...
I am really fearful you may suppose I have not attended to your request regarding the House which you seem’d disposed to purchase; but believe me my dear Sir I have constantly had it in mind & have made several attemps to conclude the Business with the Proprietor, but as yet without any success—The truth is, the Man does not know his own mind; one day he will sell & another he will not; He now...
I have found the posts belonging to the Bed and would have sent them down by the Horse cart, but William is not yet well enough to go. the Snow prevented mr Bates from going, the day he intended and the week is now so far advanced that he has thought best to stay till Monday when he will attend you, and the cart shall then take in the Bed posts & his tools. rs Greenleaf sent me word, that the...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Adams and incloses a letter just recd. from Mr. Randolph in answer to the letter from Mr. Adams, lately forwarded in one from Mr. M. to Mr. R. RC and enclosure ( MHi : Adams Papers). RC docketed by Adams. For enclosure, see n. 1. Edmund Randolph to Adams, 9 Jan. 1802 (1 p.; cover marked by Randolph: “To be read by the secretary of state”; docketed by...
I have been confined, with a cold for three weeks and the family have been generally affected in the same way: We have not heard from yours for some time. I long to see you all: but the Weather and the roads will keep us, at a distance I fear for some days if not weeks. I have read Seven Volumes of De la Harpe in course, and the last Seven I have run through and searched but cannot find what I...
We feel, my dear Sir the Want of your Society on sundays and hope the Weather and Roads will soon bless us with it. Never at the Age of 18 when I was a great Reader and Admirer of Tragedies did I take more pleasure in them, than I have lately in Reading La Harps and of Corneille Racine Voltaire Moliere La Fontaine &c did not mean to express a Wish that you should make a serious study of Greek...
I received last night your favour of the fourth, with the Letter inclosed Although I am not able to conjecture, in what manner it can possibly be of any consequence to any one, to prove that in the Year 1777 I argued a cause with Mr Lowell for Col Doane at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, before Judge Brackett, yet as Judge Bourne considers it material to him, I have no hesitation in certifying...
I have your favor of the 11th: informing me of your having sent me the Massachusetts laws & the translation from Bülow. also that you are a Suffolk Senator; whereupon I tender my congratulations. The feds’ will be glad to use your name and talents, so long as they can give them a lift; I am willing however to give them the credit of intending you a compliment, on this occasion; the triumph is...
In consequence of the death of my revered Father, it has become my duty to inform you, that by his Will, you are appointed an Executor to the Estate, conjointly with Mr. Hellen & myself. The distressing situation, in which the Family is placed, by this mournful event, is such as I must at present wave a delineation of The knowledge you have of the perplexed state of his property, will fully...
I received, at Norristown, while attending a County Court, your favor of the 25th: ult: with an enclosure for Old-school, which is already delivered to him. He is thankful for it, as well as for the translation of Bülow, which you will perceive he has begun to publish. The concluding sentence of the Editor’s introduction will excite your smile, as being the first instance, wherein he has...
General Forest has kindly given in the letter I inclose, his opinion on the doubt you suggest relative to the practicability of your joining in the execution of my Fathers Will. My ignorance of the testamentary laws of the State would not permit me to hazard the expression of any on this subject, & left me no other choice, than that of appealing for information to a friend, on whose experience...
Your favor of the 13th: came to hand, this morning. I had imagined the cause of your not writing so frequently and acquiesced in my own privation for the sake of the gratification of other people. I should not however forget, how large a portion of delight I received from your closet labors, and though you have a becoming modesty on the occasion, I presume you would not blush, if some civil...
I have at length the pleasure to inform you that Mr: Hellen will administer solely on my Father’s Estate. Several circumstances conspired against an early decision, or I should have done myself the honor of acknowledgeing ere this the receipt of your much esteemed favor of the 27 Ultimo. At the time I requested your opinion on the propriety of my undertaking the Execution of the Will, I was...
I received yesterday your cover dated the 30th: ult: enclosing a packet for our friend Oldschool, which made his heart right glad, and he begs a further supply, which may be addressed to him directly, or under cover to me, until I inform you of my determination to evacuate this place. I am to Set out tomorrow morning for the little excursion, which I mentioned to you in my last, and in my...
Mr: Walter who had been in the City Several days, while I was absent, called at my dwelling & left your favor of the 5th: instt: yesterday. I am sorry, that he proceeded to Washington without my Seeing him, but he promises me this pleasure on his return. I have now returned to my old haunts for the Season, and though we cannot yet boast of perfect health in the City, there is reason to...
I have received your favors of the 27th: ult: and 1st: currt; the latter enclosing your bill upon London, for £1000 St: and I have this day given it into a Broker’s hands, to be Sold. If the Sum had been divided into two bills for £500 each I could have Sold them myself: and should you draw again, it would ensure a more Speedy Sale, to have them thus divided. I am not sufficiently acquainted...
The Eastern Mail brought your letter of the 23d: this morning. The business part of it stands thus. Dr: Woodhouse has been in the habit of putting up chemical equipage at various prices, and when our friend Quincy wrote for one, last year I communicated the order to the Dr: Professor himself, who promised to attend to it. This promise, no doubt escaped his memory, as he has since been twice...
Your favors of the 4th: & 12th: curret: are received, the first enclosing a post note for $50, which is placed to your credit. The flour for my mother is ordered, but since the shutting of the river, by the ice, I apprehend it will not reach Boston, ‘till Spring. When the bill is presented I will pay it. The Chemical apparatus is so far advanced, that I believe it will be improper to retract,...
I received, yesterday, your favor of the 27th: ult: and thank you, for the wholesome admonitions, it contains. Your advice will always receive due attention, both from myself and our friend. When you shall have received and perused, the concluding numbers of the Port Folio, & taken with you the consideration of the extreme rapidity with which they were published, I think you will discover...
Since I am embarked in a very doubtful speculation, and I am ready to own, that I am by no means sanguine as to its success, yet as I am assured of your good will and best wishes towards the promotion of our interest, you must also indulge me in one request I have to make, which is to leave off croaking , which you know I never could endure, not because I could not appretiate the use and the...
I do not intend to write you very often, though I find it impossible to refrain altogether. Your last is of the 10th: instt: but a subsequent enclosure has been received, which gave great joy to our trusty and well-beloved O. liver O. ldschool A second sheet is wished, before the publication commences, lest the thread should be broken. As yet you will not expect any very brilliant account of...
House Barn and Land 10 Acres 2000 } 6500 108. House Barns and Land bought of my Brother with the Additn 3000 House & Land bought of Wm Vesey 1500 24 Place formerly Deacon Belchers 2250 6 Six Acres formerly Col Quincys 700 9 Nine Acres of Pasture on Penns Hill— 270
Your favor of the 20th: inst: came to hand yesterday, in the condition, which you have the cover here enclosed, except that the wax was not broken. By some means or other, the packet was sent on to Washington , and the name of J. Adams, on the back of it, must have excited the curiosity of some body, who from appearances, took the very excusable liberty, in this free country, to inspect its...
last Evenings Mail brought presented me your Welcome letter, announceing the pleasing intelligence of my dear Louisa’s of the Safety of My Beloved Child Permit me to offer my sincere Congratulation on this happy event the memorable day which gave him Birth to the little stranger is I hope a Presage to his own Independence, the greatest Blessing, (health Excepted) this World has the Power to...
I congratulate you upon the birth of another Son and the comfortable state of your wife’s health. My opinion of her grows more favorable in proportion to the increase of the male branch of her family, and by the time She is prepared to name her fourth boy I hope she will remember, that the joyless state of celibacy to which her husbands brother is condemned, should recommend him to the...
I duly received your favor of the 8th. inst. with the two last sheets of the Review. Your suggestion respecting the life of Florian came too late, as the paper was already put to press. I do not however think the circumstance of much consequence, since at almost any distance, of time the person, who opened the letter, might recollect when he saw it in print, when & how & where he had seen it...
Know all Men, by these Presents, that I John Adams of Quincy, in the County of Norfolk, in the State of Massachusetts, Esquire, in Consideration of Twelve thousand Eight hundred and Twelve dollars paid me by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk, and State aforesaid, the Receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge, do hereby give grant Sell and convey unto the Said John Quincy Adams...
I was happy to meet you this evening with your good family, and was returning from the Presidents where I had been to carry the ratification of the Louisiana Treaty it passed 24 yeas 7 Nays. I should have stopped but supposed your being detained in the cold would be no compliment. The jacobins are caballing & I expect will attack me tomorrow when I shall want the aid of all my friends. I hope...
I received your Letter from Providence and rejoiced in the favorable account you gave of your journey thus far, but a Letter Since received by your Sister dated at Newark gave us all much anxiety upon Mrs Adams’s account. We hope her disorder was only occasiond by over fatigue; and that a little rest would restore her. She is a veteran in journeying, and has frequently gone through what would...
I did not expect a very frequent correspondence with you when you left me; however interested we each of us feel in the happiness and prosperity of our Country, there is little hope that observation, upon the measures pursued, or anxiety for the event of them, would alter or amend them: The Group which composed the National Counsels as is certainly such an one, as has not heretofore been...
We have not a printer in Boston who gives us any of the debates in either house of Congress: I have seen the National intelligencer for a few weeks past, I there read the debate which I presume was the cause of dr Eustice writing to mr. Jos’ Hall the following, “You will probably have heard of the Bold an independant manner in which JQA. voted away from his party, having gained credit with us...
I have received under cover from you two letters for Mr Stokes, which I delivered as soon as received The inclosed letter Mrs. Whitcomb gave me yesterday—The letter from Russel & Cutler I transmit at this request Mr Russels request You will probably have seen Ben Russell’s paper of last Saturday, a scrap of which I now send you, containing an extract of a letter, pretending to be from...
I reached Boston on Saturday Evening the 10th: inst: and came out to Quincy on Sunday afternoon, with Cousin Shaw—Our parents are well; my Mother is wonderfully recovered, and seems to me to be as active & busy as ever about her family—this is a great comfort to me, and will help to render solitude in some measure supportable. . I feel, that there will be ample time to reflect on my future...
16 December 1803. “Having transmitted to Mr. King, the inquiry contained in your letter of , I have received the answer of which a copy is inclosed. The office of State possesses no further information on the particular point in question with the Committee.” RC ( DNA : RG 46, Foreign Relations, 8B-B2). 1 p.; printed in ASP American State Papers: Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the...
I received yesterday your favor of the 7th: instant in which you request information, respecting the claim of Mr. Engel against Jacob Mark & Co. of New York. I have already stated to you the circumstances in which the affairs of the house of Messrs. Marks were involved at the time I received Mr. Engel’s papers, and I employed Mr. S. B. Malcom of New York to investigate, as far as he was able,...
On my return last evening from Atkinson where I have passed the last eight days in company with your brother Thomas I had the pleasure to receive your letters of the 23 & 24 ult. with Mr. Tracy’s speech for which I am much obliged to you At present I have only time to say that Mr Stedman was the writer of the letter alluded to in mine of the 13th—Russel when he shew me the letter did not...
I am indebted to you for two Letters Since I wrote to you. Your Letter of december 22d. I thank you for, as well as the other; to me your conduct wanted not any justification or explanation. I am fully Satisfied that you have weighed every measure, looking much further into concequences than those who censure and condemn. Yet I like to have some reasons to give to those who feel anxious upon...
I attended the Commissiones on the 10th. inst. and arranged your business relative to the House of Bird, Savage & Bird—I consulted the attorney General of the United States, relative to the appointment of assignees, and joined him in voting for the same persons in your case, as he employed in the claim of the United States—I have also substituted Mr. M. L. Davis to attend to the business, he...
I am sorry to say that I write you from my Sick Chamber, where I have been confined for near a week with the Severest attack of the Rhumatism which I have experienced for many years in my Limbs. I hope it will not be very durable, but submission is my lesson, and patience my Study. We last Evening received the Port Folio containing the Character of your much Loved Friend. I read it with a...
Your favor of the 14th Instant I recd last Evg. The Act you inclos’d is one of the most extraordinary that ever was taken up by a Legislature to authorize the P of US. to deny the rights of hospitality to any Ship of Warr upon the evidence most probably of a few drunken Sailors. it is the opinion of those to whom I have shewn it that it will soon tend to involve us in a Maritime Warr with...