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I enclose the Letter just received I cannot guess why it was written to me— MHi : Adams Papers.
I forgot when I closed my last to answer your question concerning my brothers baggage—He wishes it to be put into some safe place until it can be reshiped to New Orleans; to which place he intends returning as soon as his health is reestablished, unless he could exchange the situation he holds there for something which would be an occupation, one an equivalent in point of pecuniary matters...
Another Letter was yesterday brought me but it gave me no hopes of your return and I dare not flatter myself yet that you will obtain any answer more decisive to this last effort, than they have hitherto given upon any point. as I wrote you once before notwithstanding I am so anxious to see him you I could almost wish you might be detained untill the coming Spring, so fearful am I that this...
I am all impatience to hear from you, my beloved friend, and cannot concieve the reason, of your not having written from New York, according to your promise. there are some reports about that have occasioned me some much uneasiness and I wish very much to learn, that our friends there are all well , not a line having been recieved here. I have sent your Bank book, &c, as you desired, and have...
July 22 Major and Mrs. Jackson Mr Ewing and Mr. N. Biddle called on us, all of them talking of nothing but your rejoinder, which is thought even better of than the remarks—They told me to tell you that there was no dissenting voice on the subject, and Mr. R. was universally condemned—He is quite Kilt so dont disturb him, but let him get what rest he can under such circumstances—George Harrison...
I was so fortunate as to recieve your No 25 on Wednesday which was the day in course but as it was the first time I mention it as something extraordinary I shall certainly be very cautious as you request about your letters— I cannot help smiling at your affected difficulty about filling a sheet of Paper and were it possible that a compliment from your wife could have any value I should almost...
We have proceeded thus far on our journey as well and with as much pleasure as we could possibly have expected and the day I have passed at this place will ever be remember’d by me with gratitude and pleasure from the very polite and kind attention of the Governor and his Lady to whom Mr Harris gave me letters of recommendation they are a charming couple exact suited to please me as they are...
19 Sept My last I believe closed on this day; I will therefore continue the account of our proceedings—While we were at Table the Count and his daughter paid us a visit and left Cards—and in the Evening we received an invitation to a water party at four o’clock tomorrow afternoon; and to spend the Evening which we graciously accepted. After which we strolled to the burying ground, where Miss...
I enclose two letters my be loved friend which I request you will give to Adelaide I have not recieved your promissed letter I will not say that I anticipate much pleasure from its perusal as I think it is an answer to a letter I wrote you which has caused me much regret still to hear from you at all affords me so much real satisfaction. I anxiously await its arrival firmly convinced that you...
My last letter mentioned some good news which I had heard from America I thank God this has been confirm’d and a great deal beside which I had neither thought’s or hopes of I was in expation of your last Letter’s being filled with the particulars but the date from London was precisely the same and you could not recieve it untill two days later your next will however contain all this news and...
My health continues to mend rappidly and the prospect of soon rejoining you and my little darlings supports my spirits and enables me to bear the dreadful stroke that has befallen me with more fortitude than otherwise I fear I should have done— I can safely assure you that this misfortune was not caused by any imprudence on my part Dr. Weems is satisfied that the Child had been subject to...
Ere I touch upon the melancholy subject which at present occupies your mind; allow me to offer the most sincere congratulations on the return of this day, which I had intended to celebrate in common with our family, and the Members of the administration, as a testimony of regard—The event which has so recently occurred, which altho’ painful to the individual feelings of all who had the...
We have accomplished our journey thus far as well as I anticipated but my brother was so ill this morning I was fearful we should be obliged to remain at Baltimore for some days. As however he is better this Eveng he has determined to go on in the Stage and reach Philadelphia tomorrow morning—I shall therefore send the Carriage round to join us there— Our Stage party consists of Mr Pratt of P....
I recieved your last very kind letter two days since and return you many thanks for your verses the idea is extremely beautiful and I should be much delighted to see it dressed in some other form by you I do not admire the versification at present whatever you do write must be more grateful to me than the best piece that ever was penned— I followed the multitude today and went to pay my...
Your two last No 12 & 13 were delivered to me at the same time I presume the first had been detained at the Post Office and closely inspected and even the second was also examined but not detain’d As to Day was our Wedding day and the day on which the Emperor’s return to us Capital was celebrated I went to the Te Deum and spent my morning in praying for the success of your Mission. when I...
August 17 Mr. Cook called to inform me he intended to return to Washington tomorrow; and while he was sitting with me the Doctor again went through the operation on my brother again which was as in the former case attended with complete success. For two hours after he suffered great anguish, but I gave him a small dose of laudanum which soothed the irritation of his nerves; and he was much...
Mr Gurney having called on me yesterday, to give notice that he should quit your house next quarter day, and that he wished to settle with you as soon as possible, I have thought it best to write you my beloved friend, he having expressed a desire to leave it immediately, which I did not think you would approved; he mention’d not having it in his power to pay you at present, but will give you...
I had left off writing entirely from the idea that you would have left England Ghent befor a Letter of mine could reach but from all the accounts which we here recieve I find that it is possible you may remain at Ghent half the Winter therefore I have resolved to write again and trust to chance for the return of my Letters in case you should be on your way— I have moved into Town and made...
I have this moment recieved your kind letter my best friend it has removed a load of anxiety from my heart which was becoming almost insupportable I wrote you yesterday that I was well to day I am even better as my mind is at ease your letter laid two days in the Cambridge post office which accounts for the unusual delay— The Death of Col. Wythe was attended with the most horrid circumstances...
I yesterday wrote to you in answer to your Letter and as I suppose it will be agreeable to you to hear from the family frequently I write again to day— Last night there was a Town meeting called in honour of your fathers memory which was immesely crowded and at which Mr. Rush and Governor Barber distinguished themselves very handsomely—It was the wish of these Gentlemen to combine the events...
16 Wrote two Letters in the morning and amused myself with reading Miss Porters new Novel—Mary being much better we went again to see Mrs. Sergeant who detained us to Tea—Was introduced to Mr. Phew and his Son the latter of whom is a woe begone widower who is very desirous of being sent as Secretary of Legation with some of our Ministers abroad—He has never allowed his hair to be Cut since the...
Your letters Profiles & Money have arrived safe for which I return my thanks It is true I felt severely disappointed at not finding yours among them but I endeavour’d to console myself with the transporting idea of soon possessing the dear original and every regret vanished in the sweet anticipation of our approaching meeting— I wrote you that you might possibly be at a Wedding & in the course...
19 June—Although we have no variety to amuse us or nor any striking incidents to relate I must resort to my old practice of journalizing; and will begin, as I know your anxiety on the subject by stating, that I am a great deal better and resuming my usual tone of spirits—We all met at breakfast in a more social manner than common, and Mr Porterfield who is the quiz of the party was...
We arrived here yesterday morning after a rapid tho’ not remarkably pleasant journey from French Town at ten o’clock and by dint of absolute starving my brother accomplished his journey but in a state of complete exhaustion— We immediately sent for Dr. Physick who finds his case a dreadful one, though we trust not hopeless—His decision was prompt as to the necessity of a painful operation; but...
June 25. Johnson went to Town and on mountain mounting his Horse; the Beast trod on his foot and hurt him very much— 26 He went to see Mr. Caruthers who was too ill to admit him—He is beginning to feel the effect of the Water which promises to be very salutary, and is in high spirits at the appointment of Dr. Watkins; I am very glad of it but could not help exclaiming poor Frye! He is also...
August 19 Notwithstand the budget just sent, there is still some thing left to be said in answer to some observations of yours concerning place hunters—As you say they certainly do wish to live in your thoughts ; but their pride is hurt when you suffer this to appear in your manner —Men often do things which however they feel ashamed of doing; or in other words they cannot bear to be made...
I am rejoiced my best friend to find by your last that you have at length recieved one of my letters your anxiety must have been great but I flatter myself that you know me too well to have suspected me of negligence I every hour feel your absence more, sensibly and shall most heartily happy when the period arrives which is to restore you to us three long months must yet elapse before I can...
I recieved your very kind letter and was rejoiced to hear that you had arrived safe at New York as I was a little apprehensive Patty might occasion you some trouble on the road. I am extremely glad she performed her journey so well. It is painful to me to renew the subject of our last letters but I cannot suffer you to suppose that I remained here from choice had I had the slightest prospect...
In the first place I will inform you, as I know how very particular you are, that I have received No 9 and 10 with its enclosures, the last of which I have sent to your old friend the good Revd: Pere, by Mr Smith ten minutes after its reception this morning at 10 oclock. In the next place you will observe that I have number’d my letter and that you are indebted to me two numbers. my first was...
21 Sept Still at Borden Town methinks I hear you say? “I hope my dear your head is not quite turned by all the fine things you meet?” I answer I hope not, but almost fear to ask myself the question—My last I believe informed you of the party at Mont Point Breeze. This Eveng the Count and his family spent here with Mrs. Hopkinson; and we laboured hard to amuse them, and I fear did not atchieve...