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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy"
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Having received a very elegant Lace Cap from the Ladies of the Lace school at Newport I write to request that you will do what you think proper while there as to the expression of thanks and the real admiration which the extreme beauty of the work deserves—as it is really equal to the finest European Lace—We leave Boston tomorrow morning and expect to be at New York on Friday night— Give my...
I send this enclosure and add a few lines to state that I shall leave this place on Wednesday for Washington and hope to find Letters from you in New York—We shall go by the way of Hudson and Poughkeepsy— Yours Ever MHi : Adams Papers.
I intended writing to you yesterday but was prevented by a feverish indisposition which I believe was occasioned by the Water—I am much better to day, and hasten to inform you of our movements with which you have not been able to keep pace because they have been so variable— At Mrs. de Wints I was constantly sick during my stay, and appeared to be growing worse every hour—I found afterwards it...
I have been so very sick the last day or two it has been impossible for me to write you I am still very much indisposed but intend to proceed to Albany this Evening in the Steam Boat I believe my illness is occasioned by the keeness of the air which has reproduced most of the symptoms of the last Summers complaint The weather is however much warmer to day and I hope I shall soon be better in...
We have arrived safely here after a tolerably pleasant journey and a very pleasant visit at Borden Town although poor Mrs. Hopkinson was sick the greatest part of the time—I sent Charles on to secure me apartments and Mr Biddle accompanied me to this City in the Steam Boat from Washington—but our passage was boisterous and disagreeable— Charles King informed me last night that he had forwarded...
I was so much hurried when I wrote to you from New York that I am afraid you could scarcely read the scrawl—We left that City yesterday Morning and arrived here at about seven o clock last Evening—Mrs de Wint is much better than she has been and I find her looking very well— In consequence of Mr Kings having enclosed your Letters to me under cover to yourself at New York I have been much...
Having just received a letter from John I wish to know if you are desirous that I should come on before the affairs are settled as I have no interest in the concerns and as I am aware of the difficulties incident to the settlement I think it will be better for me to have nothing to do with it as it is impossible for me to steer clear of breakers however I may wish it I shall proceed to New...
From the earnestness of my last Letter I am much afraid that you may think as is often the case with my friends that it proceeded from ill temper—It was most assuredly not with such a motive or in such a disposition that it was written It sprung from the feeling of anxiety which the extreme difficulty of your situation produced and under the idea that Mr Quincy had relinquished his charge...
I yesterday sat down to answer your last Letter, and wrote two, neither of which I have sent, as the nature of my feelings were was such that their expression could not have been agreeable—Altho’ still under it unpleasant impressions, and knowing that neither my opinions or feelings will ought avail, I consider myself in duty bound to write, lest you should misinterpret my silence and deem it...
I did not write you yesterday because I was so much fatigued I was obliged to lie down as soon as I returned from the Capitol—The services were tolerable in the manner peculiar to both the Gentlemen who officiated, and were a happy specimen of the tame and the bombastic—Mr. Port’s prayer was handsomely made for you; and I think the Doctor had a leaning to the Sage of Quincy, which appeared...
This day has brought me an invitation in form to attend at the Capitol tomorrow to witness the ceremonies and I am told that I must go—I shall therefore attend and all the members of the family will attend with me— Mr. Wirt declines the uniting the two characters in the Oration on the plea of not having known your father personally and his Patrick Henry having proved a failure from the same...
I yesterday wrote to you in answer to your Letter and as I suppose it will be agreeable to you to hear from the family frequently I write again to day— Last night there was a Town meeting called in honour of your fathers memory which was immesely crowded and at which Mr. Rush and Governor Barber distinguished themselves very handsomely—It was the wish of these Gentlemen to combine the events...
Ere I touch upon the melancholy subject which at present occupies your mind; allow me to offer the most sincere congratulations on the return of this day, which I had intended to celebrate in common with our family, and the Members of the administration, as a testimony of regard—The event which has so recently occurred, which altho’ painful to the individual feelings of all who had the...
13 July— After I closed my Letter and just as we were sitting down to supper in came Mr John and to my great astonishment in a Hack—He tells me that one of our Horses gave out at Middletown and he was obliged to leave him there with the Coachman to take care of him as he would not be able to move for some days.—He looks remarkably well and is in high spirits—Miss Lewis continued very ill all...
11 July. This day we celebrated and drank the health of my best friend accompanied by every good wish for his future happiness Dr Watson and several Gentlemen dined with us but I did not mention your name to them or give publicity to the occasion—Our company encreases fast we have a Mrs. Dawson Mrs. Lyons an old Lady who came ninety Miles on horseback and a Mr. Baily from Newington Pensylvania...
July 9 I think I closed my last to you my best friend on Thursday I shall therefore continue to give you an account of our proceedings although I fear they do not prove very amusing. A short time after breakfast Mr. Rankin arrived and engaged apartments here for three or four weeks—I rode out with Mr. & Mrs. Justice in the morning and did not see him until dinner time—I perceived that our...
Your Letter is this moment brought me my dear John and I confess I was very much disappointed in not seeing you in propria personea as my last epistle was to be considered positive if your father did not go soon to Boston—I trust however that the one I last sent will induce you to start immediately— I had written thus far when it occurred to me that John would probably have left Washington...
Mr Crane brought me your Letter last Eveng from Bedford but although I was rejoiced to receive it I fancied either that you were not well or that your spirits were not so good as usual—I hope I was mistaken or that it was only a momentary depression occasioned by the heat— John writes that you have been unusually harrassed by business and I am glad to learn that the President is gone as I hope...
2 July I must continue journalizing for want of something better to do as the time hangs heavily on our hands and we must do something to guard against that all devouring complaint ennui—While we were riding with Mrs. Brewer we met a Carriage going to the Springs with a fresh supply of company—We went to the Chalebrate Spring about two miles from Bedford and drank some of the Water which is...
29th June—The Eveng was very dull and Mr Crane though in all probability a very good man has not the talent of conversation; or rather of that kind of talk which animates and amuses—Johnson is evidently much better but still thinks himself very bad—His complaints are half of them imaginary in consequence of living too much alone— 31 I believe I have gone back a day as I think I mentioned the...
June 25. Johnson went to Town and on mountain mounting his Horse; the Beast trod on his foot and hurt him very much— 26 He went to see Mr. Caruthers who was too ill to admit him—He is beginning to feel the effect of the Water which promises to be very salutary, and is in high spirits at the appointment of Dr. Watkins; I am very glad of it but could not help exclaiming poor Frye! He is also...
27 I sent to know if Mrs. Morgan would see me but it was so late when I received an answer that I could not go—We took a long walk. Mr Morgan is again worse and it is now thought the melancholy news scene will soon be closed— 28 Govr & Mrs. Findlay called with Capt Porter of Easton Pensylvania they sat an hour during which time the Govr was quite chatty and witty—Mr Porter asked if it was not...
June 24 I closed a sheet last Eveng. to send you and was quite low spirited at not hearing from you or John—This Morning Mary and myself were gratified by the receipt of your packet which gave us an excellent appetite for breakfast and contributed largely to her recovery—I hope George will acquit himself handsomely on the fourth as I am sure it would gratify his Grand father very much—I am...
22 Notwithstanding I have just closed a sheet I shall continue to write, as I know however trifling my subject; you will be pleased to see that I am sufficiently recovered to be amused or interested by the little occurences which pass around me— Yesterday was a day of incessant rain and we were shut up in the House the whole day of course obliged to seek amusement in whatever shape it might...
19 June—Although we have no variety to amuse us or nor any striking incidents to relate I must resort to my old practice of journalizing; and will begin, as I know your anxiety on the subject by stating, that I am a great deal better and resuming my usual tone of spirits—We all met at breakfast in a more social manner than common, and Mr Porterfield who is the quiz of the party was...
Johnson arrived last Eveng. and brought me your very kind Letter my best friend and I am truly grieved to learn that you were so anxious; more especially as I did not write until I arrived at this place, in consequence of having omitted to bring some paper for that purpose—As the Stage only goes three times a week, I took the earliest opportunity after taking possession of our appartments to...
I enclose a Letter from Mary to Mrs. Gelbot and at the same time have the pleasure to inform you that we are pretty well—Mr. Todd the M.C. has done me the honour to call on me with two other Gentlemen We have four invalids here besides ourselves all elderly men three Virginians and one from Carlisle—The life we lead is so quiet we have not a single incident to note excepting that yesterday was...
We have arrived safely at this place—after a very fatiguing and anxious journey on account of the roads which are worse than you can imagine— often created apprehensions for the safety of the Horses as the trial was almost beyond their strength— The Country through which we have passed is extremely beautiful but the Mountains, though high cannot compare with those of Silesia The Soil in the...
Having forgotten to order Georges bed to be removed into my dressing room I now write to ask you to tell Antoine to have it prepared and all his paraphernalia placed within his reach—He is much better to day after having had a very bad night and a great encrease of fever in consequence of too great excitement during the day which the Doctor says must be carefully avoided for some time to come...
Mr Young the Bar keeper visits Washington to day and I write a few lines to say that though George is doing well the inflamation of the Arm subsides so slowly it will not be possible to flex it for some days and our stay here I fear will be considerably lengthened—You must not be anxious as he is doing well but makes too many efforts to help himself which makes me tremble for the arm in future...