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The President of the United States left Philadelphia this morning without any previous notice. A parcel of Commissions are ready to be signed, & I now forward them to you requesting you to lay them before the President. The manner of his departure indicates that the knowledge of his journey should not be communicated. I am Sir, &c MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers.
I have rec d from you one Letter and no more Since I left N. York. Your Electors appear like a large black Spot in a bright Circle of Unanimity which extends from N. H. to Maryland inclusively. Then the Region of Darkness begins again and extends I know not how far. A decided Reprehension from N. York and Virginia would very Sensibly affect me, if there were not most unequivocal Marks of a...
Our Patriots are so anxious lest Aristocracy should take root, that I wonder they do not eradicate all the seeds of it. instead of Addressing M r Speaker, they should address Freddy Mulenbourg— instead of talking of the Gentleman from Virginia they should quote Billy Giles &c &c &c The Purity of this Symplicity has always appeared among Insurgents. In Chaises and Bradfords Patriotick Efforts I...
I must write you a few lines by this opportunity, altho tis a long time since I had the pleasure of hearing from you by your own Hands. You used to be fond of writing and have been very good since your absence. Letters are always valuable from those we Love, if they con­ tain nothing but an account of their Health. I cannot but reflect with thankfullness to the Great Preserver of my dear...
I received last night your favor of the 19th. The letters from Mr Desdoity & Mr R B Forbes I shall inclose to the Secretary of State, the first to be determined according to law and usage and the last to be considered in its season. The scene of which you have been witness in the city must have been very solemn. I never could bear a city life in the summer, in the best seasons. Such an one as...
I wrote you on the 14 of February a letter, which I am informed you have received, but to which no answer from you has yet reached me. Nor have I since it was written received a line from you. I must again repeat the request that you would give me immediate information concerning the property which I have entrusted to you. I have also to request that you would not draw upon Messr: Willing of...
on the Commencement of the new Year I wish you health, honour, Profit and Pleasure through the Course of it, and as many repetitions of these anniversaries as shall be for your own happiness and the benefit of your Friends and Connections in the World. Application and that alone will Secure you, under the Smiles of divine Providence the Blessings of Life. Make for me the Compliments of the...
I congratulate you on your Admission to the Bar and your taking Possession of an Office in So good a Part of the Town, and I would not advise you to exhange it for any other, without an absolute necessity. There is a great Advantage to a Lawyer in being always to be found in the Same place. I wish you as much Success as you can desire and all the Pleasure and Profit from your Practice in a...
I am sometimes affraid my dear Boy that you will be spoilt by being a favorite. Praise is a Dangerous Sweet unless properly tempered. If it does not make you arrogant, assuming and self sufficient, but on the contrary fires your Breast with Emulation to become still more worthy and engageing, it may not opperate to your Disadvantage. But if ever you feel your Little Bosom swell with pride and...
I thank you for your Kind Letter of the 9th. of April, and congratulate you on the admission of your Brother, which must add much to your happiness. Thomas I suppose will join you in the fall, my Heart will be often with my treasure, at the University. My friends in their Letters give me favourable accounts of all my sons and of my Nephew Mr. Cranch, Your Characters are fair take care to keep...
I am happy to hear of your safe arrival tho not at the port, I wished to hear you were. You will however have a more extensive opportunity of seeing that part of the world, if you travel by land to France. I wrote you largely by Mr. Austin which I hope you have received. A very soar hand prevents my writing many things which I have in my mind, and which will be committed to paper as soon as I...
I wish you to take of Berry and Rogers as handsome a set of my Defence as you can find and packet them up handsomely and address them to The Reverend Joseph Priestley D. D. London, and send them by your Brother and Sister Smith. That Philosopher has made them so many Compliments in conversation as well as one in print; and as his sett was probably destroyed by the Rioters at Birmingham, I...
The Nature, Designs, rise, Progress, present State future Operations and successes of “Selfcreated Societies,[”] are likely to become Objects of interesting Enquiry and should be critically Studied by a Lawyer. We know something of the History of them in France. The fruits of them in Geneva you will see in the Pamphlet inclosed which was written by D’Ivernois. The fruits of them in Scotland,...
I rec d. yesterday your favour of the 18 by the Post M r Van Persyn, whom you mention as the Bearer I have neither Seen nor heard of. My Conclusion is that he is not yet come on. I should be very glad to See him and receive the Letters he brought for me. My Friendship for M r Luzac will be motive enough to do him all the Service in my Power. The Disposition of The H. of R. is very firm not to...
What! are my venerable Old Friend Gates, and my respectable old Acquaintance Osgood, and my intimate Connection W. S. Smith, about becoming Town Meeting Men and to aid the Democratical Societies, the Constitutional Societies and the Jacobinical Clubbs, in their Attempts to overawe the Government of their Country? or is the Object to divide the People into Parties? or to force Us into a War...
I have given to our brother Thomas a general power of Attorney to transact all business on my behalf within the United States. I have therefore to request you to account with him for all my property in your hands amounting to four thousand dollars, and the interest upon that sum for more than two years as appears by your letters to me, and by information from Doctor Welsh that you have made no...
I believe I never have acknowledged the Rec t of your favour of March 21.— In Dexter and Ames We lost the Lyre of Aphion in our H. of R. and Jaring Discords have led Mydas astray ever since. The Rout before us is very thorny and very rugged and very Steep and what is worse than all the End of it is far behind the Hill, out of our sight, and may be more dangerous and impracticable than any Part...
I have been thinking of a subject for a letter to you, & I can find none more agreable than that which is the constant employment of my thoughts, I mean the French Language, & as you will very soon begin the same study, it will be profitable to you as well as to myself, to sketch a little plan for the more easy & effectual acquisition, of so elegant & useful accomplishment, as that of reading,...
Your Letter of Yesterdays Date has given me much Pleasure. I recognize in it, my own son. Your Language to the Gentleman was manly and your sentiments independent. Col. Smiths Aberrations from the true system of his Country have given me great Uneasiness. You must let me know in Confidence, the Name of the Gentleman. Every Citizen has a right to think, speak and Act for himself in his own...
A fat Sleekheaded young Gentleman was here last Week or the Week before who told me he knew you, that you were well that you had a good share of Business: that your disposition was so amiable that People were fond of throwing Business into your hands &c— All this was Musick in my Ears— I know not his name but am told he is a Limb of the Law in your City. According to Peter Pindar Business is...
A Letter from M r Jay of the 24. of November informs me, that he had rec d two Letters from your Brother in Holland, one of the 14 th. and another of the 20 th. the first at the Hague the last at Amsterdam, which inform’d him that your Brother had been presented to their High Mightinesses, and rec d and acknowledged by them, and that he had Afterwards had an Audience of the statholder. so that...
I have recieved with pleasure your letter of the 22d. of octr. and agree with you that the times are such as to make it difficult for a young Gentleman, to determine upon a Profession, yet there is no reason to be discouraged, The Prospect will brighten. I have so well grounded a Veneration for the Law, that I shall never discourage any of my sons from pursuing the study of it, if their Genius...
we being so far from one another that I cannot Leave my pen out of my hand & I hope that my Letters will not be troublesome to you Yesterday my Pappa received a number of news papers from america in one of which I read that you had got an account of doctor Franklins being asasinated but I beg you would not regard any of those Storys, of which I expect you will hear a great number give my duty...
I often envy you the pleasure you enjoy in being at a place where you with pleasure look around you upon the rugged rocks & homly pastures & what is of more Consequence you can Converse with Mamma Sister & brother these are pleasures that are not exceeded by all the gaiety & riches of europe. your buisiness & mine are upon the Same foundation to qualify ourselves to be useful members of...
How does my son after the fatigues of a voyage. A young adventurer indeed, how many times did you wish yourself by mammas fireside. But pappa wrote me that you made as good a sailor as your Brother, flatterd you a little I suppose, But I was very glad to hear you did so well. I hope before this time that you are safe landed possibly arrived at Paris and placed at school, where I hope you will...
I wrote you on the 25 of October & 29 of Dec r: 1796. & on the 14 th: of May & 1 st: of August of the last year. All these letters excepting that of 14 May, related to my affairs in your hands.— I have never received any answer whatever to either of them. That of 29 Dec r: I think must have miscarried, but I have long since received answers from other persons, to letters which went by the same...
I condole with you, under the mournful News of the Barons Palsy. I have long wondered that a Military Character so habituated to exercise should have neglected it so imprudently for so many Years. This Country is loosing in rapid Succession the Characters who were forward and active in the Revolution. M r Handcock, M r sherman M r Alsop, M r Witherspoon, M r Clark M r Lee, M r Gillon, and now...
I arrived here this Evening with your Mother and Cozen all in good health, and was Sorry to hear that you went from hence on Monday unwell. I hope you are better. If I go into Town in Ceremony I Should be glad of your Company with me in my Carriage. My Letters will, Some of them be directed to your Care, I Shall be glad to receive them as soon as possible. Can you Send them out by the Stage to...
How do you do?—I hope you are in fine Health and Spirits. What Subject do your Thoughts run upon these Times. You are a thoughtfull Child you know, always meditating upon some deep Thing or other. Your Sensibility is exquisite too. Pray how are your nice Feelings affected by the Times? Dont you wish for Peace—or do you wish to take a Part in the War? Have you heard of the ill Nature and...
I have this day been obliged to take a serious and painful measure in the removal of the Collector of Newyork, and I wish you to give me your opinion concerning a successor— The office is important and lucrative, Walker has been named to me. What think you of him? I must and will have a good Federalist, one who will not prostitute his office, to a Foreign faction, or a domestic one,— I am &c a...