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A fat Sleekheaded young Gentleman was here last Week or the Week before who told me he knew you, that you were well that you had a good share of Business: that your disposition was so amiable that People were fond of throwing Business into your hands &c— All this was Musick in my Ears— I know not his name but am told he is a Limb of the Law in your City. According to Peter Pindar Business is...
I rec d this morning your favour of the 7 th and am glad that your State have not too much Complaisance for the restless Projects of old Aunt Nell. The peevish fretful old Creature has got, to day, a worse Compliment from the senate of this State, than she rec d even from the Massachusetts. They have not only rejected her vapoury humours but have proposed to her some other Amendments of the...
I rec d. yesterday your favour of the 18 by the Post M r Van Persyn, whom you mention as the Bearer I have neither Seen nor heard of. My Conclusion is that he is not yet come on. I should be very glad to See him and receive the Letters he brought for me. My Friendship for M r Luzac will be motive enough to do him all the Service in my Power. The Disposition of The H. of R. is very firm not to...
I believe I never have acknowledged the Rec t of your favour of March 21.— In Dexter and Ames We lost the Lyre of Aphion in our H. of R. and Jaring Discords have led Mydas astray ever since. The Rout before us is very thorny and very rugged and very Steep and what is worse than all the End of it is far behind the Hill, out of our sight, and may be more dangerous and impracticable than any Part...
I have yours of the 22 d. M r Van Persyn I shall be glad to see whenever it Suits his convenience to come to Philadelphia. I can Say little of favourable Symptoms. The Waggon is fast in the Mire, up to the Axletree and unable to move forwards or backwards. Whether the People will draw us out or not, and Whether We shall advance or retreat I know not. The Passengers are unable to help...
Your favour of January 6 th: was received by our brother Thomas at the Hague, and by him forwarded a few days ago to me. He has been very ill during a great part of this last Winter; at first with an attack from his old Enemy the Rheumatism, and afterwards with a bilious intermittent fever, but by his last Letters he appears in a great measure to have recovered, and I hope by this time he has...
I returned here ten days ago from England and have this day received your letter of April 24. th: brought by M r: Rutgers. He is at Amsterdam, and when he comes this way it will give me much pleasure to see him. It gives me the most heartfelt satisfaction to be informed of the prosperous situation in which you are placed; of your present happiness, and future pleasing prospects, and you will...
I have received your letter of September 7 th: with the account current, which as you observe, though not altogethe mercantile in point of form is fully intelligible and satisfactory. As I shall as soon as it is in my power authorise you to make another draught on my account, I shall remind you of two directions contained in my former letters and from which it is my wish that you will in no...
It is a long time since I have had the pleasure to receive any letter from you. I suppose you spend so much time in dandling your offspring that you have none left to think of Collaterals. But what makes me most impatient is that you do not send us even the Newspapers until they are six months old. Here have arrived since the beginning of the Summer twenty or thirty vessels from New York...
I have received with great Pleasure your kind Letter of 28 th. I think M r Sands’s Plan for the Education of his Nephew is judicious. But I Should not advise him to Send him to Europe, So very early. If he remains in America two or three Years, undergoes his Examination and is admitted to the Bar it will be early enough to go to Europe. By your Representation M r Joshua Sands has been your...
I received Your kind congratulatory Letter upon the new year. accept My thank for the filial regard and affection with which they are expresst. it is the will of Providene to place me in a very conspicious station. it shall be my endeavour so to conduct in it, as to excite neither envy ill will or Jealousy. as shakspear expresses it, I would bear my Honours meekly fully sensible that I can say...
I have this day been obliged to take a serious and painful measure in the removal of the Collector of Newyork, and I wish you to give me your opinion concerning a successor— The office is important and lucrative, Walker has been named to me. What think you of him? I must and will have a good Federalist, one who will not prostitute his office, to a Foreign faction, or a domestic one,— I am &c a...
Upon my arrival at this place, about three weeks since, I received your kind letter of June 8 th: which was the first line, I have had from you these many months, and it needed not that circumstance to render it highly valuable. You do not however mention in it the receipt of several letters, which I have written you, and which I hope have not miscarried in the conveyance. Among the rest, that...
I arrived here this Evening with your Mother and Cozen all in good health, and was Sorry to hear that you went from hence on Monday unwell. I hope you are better. If I go into Town in Ceremony I Should be glad of your Company with me in my Carriage. My Letters will, Some of them be directed to your Care, I Shall be glad to receive them as soon as possible. Can you Send them out by the Stage to...
I wrote you on the 25 of October & 29 of Dec r: 1796. & on the 14 th: of May & 1 st: of August of the last year. All these letters excepting that of 14 May, related to my affairs in your hands.— I have never received any answer whatever to either of them. That of 29 Dec r: I think must have miscarried, but I have long since received answers from other persons, to letters which went by the same...
The President of the United States left Philadelphia this morning without any previous notice. A parcel of Commissions are ready to be signed, & I now forward them to you requesting you to lay them before the President. The manner of his departure indicates that the knowledge of his journey should not be communicated. I am Sir, &c MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers.
I wrote you on the 14 of February a letter, which I am informed you have received, but to which no answer from you has yet reached me. Nor have I since it was written received a line from you. I must again repeat the request that you would give me immediate information concerning the property which I have entrusted to you. I have also to request that you would not draw upon Messr: Willing of...
I have given to our brother Thomas a general power of Attorney to transact all business on my behalf within the United States. I have therefore to request you to account with him for all my property in your hands amounting to four thousand dollars, and the interest upon that sum for more than two years as appears by your letters to me, and by information from Doctor Welsh that you have made no...
I received last night your favor of the 19th. The letters from Mr Desdoity & Mr R B Forbes I shall inclose to the Secretary of State, the first to be determined according to law and usage and the last to be considered in its season. The scene of which you have been witness in the city must have been very solemn. I never could bear a city life in the summer, in the best seasons. Such an one as...
I have written to Governor Jay, directly to Albany by the Post, and have given Mr Malcom as handsome a Recommendation as you can wish.—I hope his application will be successful.—Have you any News by your Hambourg Vessells from your Brothers or concerning either of them. Whether Mr Malcom obtains his Prayer or not, I hope he will be an invariable Friend of Governor Jay: for an Abler Man, or a...