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I have rec d from you one Letter and no more Since I left N. York. Your Electors appear like a large black Spot in a bright Circle of Unanimity which extends from N. H. to Maryland inclusively. Then the Region of Darkness begins again and extends I know not how far. A decided Reprehension from N. York and Virginia would very Sensibly affect me, if there were not most unequivocal Marks of a...
Our Patriots are so anxious lest Aristocracy should take root, that I wonder they do not eradicate all the seeds of it. instead of Addressing M r Speaker, they should address Freddy Mulenbourg— instead of talking of the Gentleman from Virginia they should quote Billy Giles &c &c &c The Purity of this Symplicity has always appeared among Insurgents. In Chaises and Bradfords Patriotick Efforts I...
The most recent intelligence we have from America is contained in your letter of June 30 & July 23. which arrived some days since, and gave me information unpleasant but not unexpected. I was convinced from a variety of reasons that all the engines of popular agitation would be played off against the ratification of the treaty signed by M r Jay, and I knew that some of its contents were such...
I had the Pleasure of receiving your favour of the 1 st. on Saturday night: by your Brother, who has been admitted this Term at the Supreme Court and is rising in Practice as well as in litterary fame. We cannot be too cautious in forming our Opinions of french affairs, and We ought to be still more Slow in discoursing on them. Our amiable and excellent Friend, the Baron is like many others,...
Upon my arrival at this place, about three weeks since, I received your kind letter of June 8 th: which was the first line, I have had from you these many months, and it needed not that circumstance to render it highly valuable. You do not however mention in it the receipt of several letters, which I have written you, and which I hope have not miscarried in the conveyance. Among the rest, that...
The Revolution in France is commonly Said to be without Example in the History of Mankind: But although there may be circumstances attending it, peculiar to itself, I cannot think it altogether unlike any Thing that has happened. The Revolution in England in the time of Charles the first has so many features in common with it, that I think the History of England from the Year 1625 to the Year...
Your Letter of the 22 d , alledging Business as an Apology for not writing gave me more Pleasure than a long Letter would have done. Business is always an Apology, for declining Pleasure or Amusement of any kind. I Sent you, by a late Post other Tryals, Geralds, Muirs and Margarots. Geralds is worth all the rest. M r Laing, the Council for Gerald is I Suppose the Same with Malcolm Laing Esq r...
I rec d this morning your favour of the 7 th and am glad that your State have not too much Complaisance for the restless Projects of old Aunt Nell. The peevish fretful old Creature has got, to day, a worse Compliment from the senate of this State, than she rec d even from the Massachusetts. They have not only rejected her vapoury humours but have proposed to her some other Amendments of the...
Your Letter of the 7 th relieved my Mind, from a great Anxiety and Depression on Account of my dear Daughter. My Apprehensions foreboded very melancholly Things from the Strange Accident, of which you apprised me— A strict Enquiry ought to be made into the Conduct of that Apothecary. The State of New York never behaved well— it has always been a fluctuating, injudicious selfish and...
I received last night your favor of the 19th. The letters from Mr Desdoity & Mr R B Forbes I shall inclose to the Secretary of State, the first to be determined according to law and usage and the last to be considered in its season. The scene of which you have been witness in the city must have been very solemn. I never could bear a city life in the summer, in the best seasons. Such an one as...
I wrote you on the 14 of February a letter, which I am informed you have received, but to which no answer from you has yet reached me. Nor have I since it was written received a line from you. I must again repeat the request that you would give me immediate information concerning the property which I have entrusted to you. I have also to request that you would not draw upon Messr: Willing of...
The Papers, furnish Us this Evening with more flowers of Jacobinical Rhetorick from New York. Crushing Monarchy Confusion to Aristocracy and Monarchy: a Brutus to Tyrants &c are Still not only panting in the Bosoms of the Guests at the new Civic Feast, but they must publish their Breathings to the World. It is so customary for the Members of the Corps Diplomatick, to make Ex officio...
on the Commencement of the new Year I wish you health, honour, Profit and Pleasure through the Course of it, and as many repetitions of these anniversaries as shall be for your own happiness and the benefit of your Friends and Connections in the World. Application and that alone will Secure you, under the Smiles of divine Providence the Blessings of Life. Make for me the Compliments of the...
I have received your Letter of December 30 th. — I approve of your caution and applaud your discretion. You ought nevertheless to reconoitre the Country round about you, like a good officer. Between you and me, I believe you to be Surrounded by a gang of sharpers, and I wish you to keep a good look Out, preserve your own honour; keep a clear Conscience and clean hands: but examine every Man...
Your Favour of April 19. I believe has not yet been acknowledged. The Extracts from the King of Prussia were very acceptable. Yesterday I received your favour of May 9 th.— You ask whether there might not exist Such an Equality in Society as the Democrats of this Day Seem to advocate? Yes my Son, there are many Such Societies, in the Forrests of America, called Indian Tribes. Yet among these...
Yesterday I received your kind and pleasing Letter of the 26, and am happy to hear of your and your Ladies health. I dont approve of your calling her Sally unless to herself in a Family Way. To other People especially in Writing you must call her Mr s Adams. Your Nephews and Neice I hope will have the Meazles favourably. it is a good age and a good Season: so that I think the family may be...
Last night I received your kind Letter of Sept r. 3 d and am sorry to find that your Books were not then arrived. Before this day I hope they are in your Office, and I should be glad if you would inform me whether they are or not. The early Part of my Life was Spent among them, and they have never been many Days together out of my thoughts; so that I have contracted an habitual Affection for...
I congratulate you on your Admission to the Bar and your taking Possession of an Office in So good a Part of the Town, and I would not advise you to exhange it for any other, without an absolute necessity. There is a great Advantage to a Lawyer in being always to be found in the Same place. I wish you as much Success as you can desire and all the Pleasure and Profit from your Practice in a...
I am delighted with your delicious little Letter of 14 th. —but was puzzled to guess where you got your Description of Lubberland or what do the French call it? Pays de Cocany or some such Word. Does he get this, says I, from Old Chauar, or Spencer, or from shakespear? Young M r Otis, turned me to the Passage in elegant Extracts— It is it seems from the Tempest, which was to me, once very...
As you Seem to wish to know my sentiments of M r Kents Lecture I will give you a few Hints to assist your own Reflections and Inquiries but as they may be liable to misconstruction and Misrepresentation, they must be in Confidence between you and me. I am much pleased with the Lecture, and esteem the Talents and Character of the Professor: indeed I wish you to consider whatever I may write...
I returned here ten days ago from England and have this day received your letter of April 24. th: brought by M r: Rutgers. He is at Amsterdam, and when he comes this way it will give me much pleasure to see him. It gives me the most heartfelt satisfaction to be informed of the prosperous situation in which you are placed; of your present happiness, and future pleasing prospects, and you will...
I am sometimes affraid my dear Boy that you will be spoilt by being a favorite. Praise is a Dangerous Sweet unless properly tempered. If it does not make you arrogant, assuming and self sufficient, but on the contrary fires your Breast with Emulation to become still more worthy and engageing, it may not opperate to your Disadvantage. But if ever you feel your Little Bosom swell with pride and...
I thank you for your Kind Letter of the 9th. of April, and congratulate you on the admission of your Brother, which must add much to your happiness. Thomas I suppose will join you in the fall, my Heart will be often with my treasure, at the University. My friends in their Letters give me favourable accounts of all my sons and of my Nephew Mr. Cranch, Your Characters are fair take care to keep...
I have received with great Pleasure your kind Letter of 28 th. I think M r Sands’s Plan for the Education of his Nephew is judicious. But I Should not advise him to Send him to Europe, So very early. If he remains in America two or three Years, undergoes his Examination and is admitted to the Bar it will be early enough to go to Europe. By your Representation M r Joshua Sands has been your...
Your Letter of the 9 th , gave me great Pleasure as it discovers a curiosity that is laudable and contains a very handsome Relation of political Events and Movements in New York of great Importance to that State and very interesting to the United States. The Writings which have excited your inquisitive disposition, were of Some importance in their day as they had Some Influence on the public...
Your Letter of September 3 d. advising your having drawn the preceding day, bills on me in favour of Daniel Ludlow & C o: for ƒ7,500. at thirty days sight, was received by our Brother Thomas at the Hague on the first of this month, and forwarded by him to me, at this place, where it reached me the next day. The bills though mentioned by you as accompanying the Letter, were not presented for...
It is a long time since I have had the pleasure to receive any letter from you. I suppose you spend so much time in dandling your offspring that you have none left to think of Collaterals. But what makes me most impatient is that you do not send us even the Newspapers until they are six months old. Here have arrived since the beginning of the Summer twenty or thirty vessels from New York...
I wish you to take of Berry and Rogers as handsome a set of my Defence as you can find and packet them up handsomely and address them to The Reverend Joseph Priestley D. D. London, and send them by your Brother and Sister Smith. That Philosopher has made them so many Compliments in conversation as well as one in print; and as his sett was probably destroyed by the Rioters at Birmingham, I...
The Nature, Designs, rise, Progress, present State future Operations and successes of “Selfcreated Societies,[”] are likely to become Objects of interesting Enquiry and should be critically Studied by a Lawyer. We know something of the History of them in France. The fruits of them in Geneva you will see in the Pamphlet inclosed which was written by D’Ivernois. The fruits of them in Scotland,...
I have to thank you for your favour of Dec r: 1 st: sent me a few days since by M r Van Rensselaar. It is the first direct communication we have had from any part of our own family, since we left our Country, and it was an article which wanted no stimulus of scarcity to make it valuable. Your political information was very acceptable, and I hope you will not fail to continue it by every future...