Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail"
Results 1301-1350 of 1,357 sorted by relevance
We lodged at Monroe’s in Marlborough on Wednesday night, at Hithcocks in Brookfield Thursday night, at David Bulls in Hartford Fryday night and at Lovejoys in Stratford last night. I have been to hear Sound orthodox Calvinism from M r Stebbins this morning. At Hartford I Saw M r Adets Note in Folio to our Secretary of State, and I find it an Instrument well calculated to reconcile me to...
I have Thoughts of sending you a Nest of Letters like a nest of Basketts; tho I suspect the latter would be a more genteel and acceptable Present to a Lady. But in my present Circumstances I can much better afford the former than the latter. For, my own Discretion as well as the Prescriptions of the Faculty, prohibit any close Application of Mind to Books or Business—Amusement, Amusement is...
I have read the dispatches from the Envoys with as much astonishment as the Jacobins in congress heard them but not with those twinges of conscience which some of them must feel. those who by their false representations to that nation of the designs of the Government here & the spirit of the People in General, those who have known the truth & have ly’d to the publick, those who have been all...
I have been several times to your new house but I do feel such a want of my dear sisters smiling countinance that I do not know how to bear the house I go into the best Parlour & set my self down & view mrs Smith & the coll— this gives me some pleasure but I want to put little Jack in her arms I do wish to see & hug the little creature again that sweet archness in his countinance I shall never...
I rec d on Monday your two favours of 28. Feb. I am very glad you employed Pratt to cutt the Timber, for it is high time I had a Barn to shelter my Hay that the Cattle may not complain of it so much, as they do this Year, with Justice. I shall build only the shell this Year—Raise the Barn & Board & shingle it. The limed Manure upon the Hill I mean to have Spread upon the Grass Ground where it...
I believe you are indebted to me for a letter or two, but as your late loss has been my gain, it is more incumbent on me to attempt to compensate in some measure by my communications the absence of my Father. You have doubtless provided yourself with a comfortable supply of Winters Stores for a severe campaign, as there is reason to anticipate a long one— The Winter has but just commenced with...
Yours of the Tenth of June by Captain Barnes was brought to me Yesterday, which is only the second that I have yet received from you. The other is of 25 March. I have written to you, several Times, as often as I could, and hope they will arrive. I have put on board one ship, all the Articles in your Minute. By Captain Niles I have sent you a smal Present of Tea. By Captain Barnes, I will send...
We seem to be once more restored to some connection with our own Country; for six months after we left it, we might have been almost ignorant of its existence, but for the perpetual admonition of our own Hearts. A few days since I received from Hamburg, your favour of Feb y: 10 th. The third letter of yours that has reached me, and all within the course of three Weeks. Had you known of the...
I have a Letter partly written to you which was begun sometime ago, but as a new Seene has presented itself to my view, I will lay that aside, & ask my Sister to rejoice with me in the recovery of my Children, & Family from the Meassels, & on the birth of a fine little Daughter which was born the 2 d Day of March. She has little bones, & weighed nine pound— She is as plump as a partridge,...
your favor of the 6 th: Inst t: has been received— The expressions of tendeness & Maternal affection which it contains on my behalf, deserve a grateful return. It is true I commenced my career at the Bar, as the Prosecutor of a Female— The cause was of such a nature, that there was no necessity for personal or general remarks in the manner you allude to; I took occasion to remark to the Jury...
I know not the Time, when I have omitted to write you, so long. I have received but three Letters from you, since We parted, and these were short ones. Do you write by the Post? If you do there must have been some Legerdemain. The Post comes now constantly once a Week, and brings me News Papers, but no Letters. I have ventured to write by the Post, but whether my Letters are received or not, I...
I recd. yours of Jan. 10. Feby 21 and April the 8th And am obliged to you for your affectionate Letter of Condolance and also for the Intelligence conveyed in the several Letters. The State of our Country is uncomfortable, if not hazardous. The Scarcity (real I rather think than artificial) of Gold and Silver prompts People to seek a Remedy in Paper Money, already has Rhode Island issued...
I have a secret to Communicate to Your Prudence. The Defence by Camillus was written in Concert between Hamilton King and Jay. The Writings on the first ten Articles of the Treaty were written by Hamilton The rest by King, till they came to the question of the Constitutionality of the Treaty, which was discussed by Hamilton— Jay was to have written a concluding Peroration: but being always a...
Yesterday I had the long expected and much wish’d Pleasure of a Letter from you, of various Dates from the 2d. to the 10 March. This is the first Line I have received since I left you. I wrote you from Watertown I believe, relating my Feast at the Quarter Master General with the Coghnawaga Indians, and from Framingham, an Account of the ordnance there, and from New York I sent you a...
By one of the Newspapers I had the satisfaction to hear of your arrival at Boston, & have been anxiously enquiring for Letters at the post Office every evening. I wish to hear how you stand the warm weather, and the effect of your Journey. The object of this letter is more immediately for the purpose of requesting a decisive answer to the proposal made by M r. Bache of the House he has just...
The four Letters which your last favor of April 23. mentions to have been written to me, have been received in their regular order, though some of them were nearly five months old when they came to hand. Accept my best acknowledgements for your kindness in writing so often; to solicit a continuance of it from you, is useless, because I know you will omit no occasion of affording to your sons,...
This Town is a small one, not larger than Plymouth.—There are in it, two German Churches, the one Lutheran, the other Calvinistical. The Congregations are pretty numerous, and their Attendance upon public Worship is decent. It is remarkable that the Germans, wherever they are found, are carefull to maintain the public Worship, which is more than can be said of the other Denominations of...
I thank my dear M rs Adams for M rs Montagues observation, on the writings of shakespear which I received by Calihan. though every part of your letters always Give me pleasure I found a Certain Satisfaction peculiar in that paragraph in your last which Gives an intimation that you mean to return to America in The Spring. uncertain as all human events are I cannot but look forward & in a degree...
Your benevolence I know will excuse the particularity of this address, when you confide in the assurance of its proceeding from a sincere heart nourishing the most exalted sentiments of the virtue and sensibility of yours. Accept of my thanks for the reply to my note, I feel myself complimented by your confidence and beleive I am not capable of abusing it. I hope for an advocate in you, should...
It is some Time since I wrote you, and I have nothing, now, to write but Repetitions of Respect and Affection.—I am anxious to hear from you. I hope, the Family is better, and that your Grief for the great Loss We have all sustained is somewhat abated. I hope your Father and Sister Betcy, are well, tho they must be greatly afflicted. Give my Love to Betcy, and let her know that I feel, most...
After a most fatigueing journey I arrived on friday Evening. I travel’d all the first night, & arrived in Baltimore the next night at 9 o Clock, & sat off again at 3 the next morning. The roads as far as Wilmington were extremely bad, the rest were much better, and in this City they are quite settled. I found M rs. Cranch well, altho’ fatigued & worried with watching and attending my little...
How are you all this Morning? Sick, weak, faint, in Pain; or pretty well recovered? By this Time, you are well acquainted with the Small Pox. Pray how do you like it? We have no News. It is very hard that half a dozen or half a Score Armies cant supply Us, with News. We have a Famine, a perfect Dearth of this necessary Article. I am at this present Writing perplexed and plagued with two knotty...
I forwarded a Letter to You, Madam, yesterday by Capt. Barney, Commander of the Packet Washington, and this I expect will go by the Cicero, Capt. Hill. Have the Vessels done passing between Boston and Europe? I have received no Letters a long time from home, and I begin to grow a little impatient, especially since I have heard of my Father’s Misfortune. I have a half Story about the Matter,...
I am exceedingly oblig’d to Mrs. Adams for her condescention, in the communications she has made in the very kind billet, this day handed me, by Mr. Austin. I am sincerely pain’d at the disagreable intelligence from my Cousin! Poor unfortunate youth! I hope his life is not so near drawing to its close! Just as his conduct merited the approbation of the Judicious; when his freinds might flatter...
I have an opportunity by Captn. Beale, to write you a Line. We all arrived last Night in this City. It would take many Sheets of Paper, to give you a Description of the Reception, We found here. The Militia were all in Arms, and almost the whole City out to Meet us. The Tories are put to Flight here, as effectually as the Mandamus Council at Boston. They have associated, to stand by...
I wonder Sister Peabody Should trouble you about our Nephews concerns. the first Letter She wrote you She sent open for me to read. I had written her before desiring that mr Atwood would get all the Bills, his own, the Doctors & nursies with the funiral charges, & send them to mr Cranch with an account of what money Charles had by him. we Should then be able to write to his brother william...
We arrived here, last night, all alive, but all very near sick with violent Colds taken on the Road for Want of comfortable Accommodations. I was advised, on all Hands to come by Land rather than wait an uncertain Time for a passage by sea. But if I had known the Difficulties of travelling, in that part of Spain which I have passed through I think I should not have ventured upon the Journey....
The journey which I made to Paris, towards the last of April was performed so hastily, that it was out of my power to give you any satisfactory account of it from thence, and since my return, preparation for departure from Holland has engrossed most of my leisure hours, so that I have only found time to give an imperfect sketch to my Father of the most material occurrences of that tour. The...
I received your kind Letter, at New York, and it is not easy for you to imagine the Pleasure it has given me. I have not found a single Opportunity to write since I left Boston, excepting by the Post and I dont choose to write by that Conveyance, for fear of foul Play. But as We are now within forty two Miles of Philadelphia, I hope there to find some private Hand by which I can convey this....
I think, in some Letter I sent you, since I left Bethlehem, I promised you a more particular Account of that curious and remarkable Town. When We first came in sight of the Town, We found a Country better cultivated and more agreably diversified with Prospects of orchards and Fields, Groves and Meadows, Hills and Valleys, than any We had seen. When We came into the Town We were directed to a...
Yes my dear Sister I have thought it very long since I have receiv’d a Letter from you and thought it very Strange that you should not write me one line by the January Pacquit when mr cranch receiv’d one from mr Adams. You say you wrote but one Letter by it, but do not tell me who it was too none of your Friends here have receiv’d any, and mr King directed a number of other pioples to mr...
The Room which I thought would have been an Hospital or a Musaeum, has really proved a Den of Thieves, and a scene of Money Changers. More Persons have been with me about Business, since I shut up , than a few, and many more than I was glad to see, for it is a sort of Business that I get nothing by, but Vanity and Vexation of Spirit. If my Imprisonment had been in Consequence of Bankruptcy, I...
The Newspapers will inform you before this Letter reaches you that the Ratifications of the Treaty have been exchanged by M r Deas the Chargé d’Affairs under M r Pinkney. The President told me the orders were that if M r Adams did not arrive by a certain day this Business was to be done by another. Whether our Son will go over at all or not is to me uncertain. If he has lost a White Feather,...
We arrived at Captn. Cunninghams, about Twelve O’Clock and sent our Compliments to Dr. Perkins. The Courrier returned with Answer that the Dr. was determined to inoculate no more without a Preparation preevious to Inoculation. That We should have written to him and have received Directions from him, and Medicine, before We came into Town. I was surprized and chagrined. I wrote, instantly, a...
I am directed by the Corporation to advise you, that the Hon. Mr. Adams, in his Letter favoured by the Hon. A. Lee, informed them, “that you would deliver five Volumes of M. Court de Gébelin’s Monde Primitif with the L’Histoire natural de la Parole for our Library.” M. Gebelin has been pleased to enrich our public Library with that very learned Work. And as Mr. Adams had the five first Volumes...
Although I have written so largly to you by the last vessels that Saild I cannot bear to let another go without a few Lines. I have not yet receiv’d your Letters by Charles Storer. He is not come to Boston. I am anxious to receive them. I want to know what it is, whether any thing in particular has happen’d to make my Neice take such a determin’d part with regard to a certain Gentleman. He is...
Dryden, whom I have always loved to read now and then, because I learn something from him, informs me, if I did not know it before, that “it hath been observed in former times that none have been so greedy of Employments, and of managing the Publick, as they who have least deserved their Stations. But such only merit to be called Patriots, under whom We see their Country flourish. I have...
Yesterday We had a cool Day, the Wind Easterly and cloudy, this Morning there is a brisk northeast Wind and cool Rain, which restores Us, to some Comfort. A Number of People died here with excessive Heat, besides others, who fell Sacrifices to their own Imprudence in drinking cold Water. This Wind will oblige the Knight Errant and his Fleet, to go somewhere or other. We have had no...
Yesterday Morning I returned with Dr. F. and Mr. R. from Staten Island where We met L ord H owe and had about three Hours Conversation with him. The Result of this Interview, will do no disservice to Us. It is now plain that his L ordshi p has no Power, but what is given him in the Act of P arliament . His Commission authorises him to grant Pardons upon Submission, and to converse, confer,...
If I had received your Letter an hour sooner, I could have sent you an answer the same day, viz. Thursday, by Mr. Badcock who dined here, and would conveyed it as far as Milton Bridge himself. But having lost this Opportunity, I must send by the Post. But since you have signified your Request to Mr. Shaw only mediately, he thinks himself entitled to make use of the same Medium in giving an...
I beg you to inform M rs. Smith, that I have forwarded to M r M c. Connell enclosed in a Letter to Miss Margaret Smith the Picture she requested me to send and have rece d Information f m. D r. Crosby of M r. M c. Connell’s having rec d. my Letter— By M
I wrote you from Hartford, New York and once from Philadelphia: but have not yet had the Pleasure of a Letter from you Since I left home. The Night before last We had a deep Snow, which will probably extinguish all remaining apprehensions of Infection. We hear of no Sickness and all Seem at their Ease and without fear. The Presidents Speach will Shew you an Abundance of Serious Business which...
Why! this is very clever— Every Monday and every Thursday brings me regularly a Letter, which Softens the Tædium Vitæ The Ennui of Life, in this Wrangling disputacious Metropolis. So! We are to have a Quincy Academy! With all my Heart—I am willing to pay my Quota of the Expence. But Something more than a School House will be wanting for so desirable a Purpose. Oh that I had a Bosom to lean my...
We have a Turn of Weather as cold as any We have had through the whole Winter. The Violence of the North West Wind which has thrown down Chimneys and blown off Roofs in this City, We suppose has prevented the Eastern Mail from crossing the North River and deprived me of my Thursdays Letter as yet. I hope it will come to day. A Thousand and one Speeches have been made in the H. of Rep s. upon...
The enclosed will need your utmost candour, but as I am not able to write it over again being Still in very low health & kept so long upon Sal Vol. & Lavender that the Smell & taste of both is hateful to me & the sight of a Phial disagreable, I hope you will excuse it. The very kind Letter that I reciev’d from you when you was in France to which I fear you never reciev’d any reply; emboldens...
Yesterdays Post brought me your kind Favour of March 8. 9. 10, with a Letter inclosed for from each of my Sons. But where is my Daughters Letter? That is missing. I regret the Loss of it much. You think I dont write Politicks enough! Indeed I have a surfeit of them. But I shall give you now and then a Taste, since you have such a Goust for them. By a Letter of 17. Jany. Dr. Franklin, Mr. Deane...
I have within this Hour receiv’d your Letters by captain Bigelow and have also heard that cushing is not sail’d. He has one Letter on board for you already but tis not so long a one as I have generally sent you. The Subject was So melancholy that I could not mix any thing with it. I expected every hour that Cushing would sail and had not time to write more. I began to write you last night but...
I find that the Air of the Hague, and the Return of warm Weather, tho later than was ever known, is of great Service to my Health. I mount on Horseback every Morning, and riding is of Use to me. I have not escaped the “Influenza,” as they call it, which began in Russia and has been epidemical, in all Europe. Mr. Thaxter too has at last submitted to this all subduing Climate and had a Fever,...
The tender solicitude you have shewn for my health, demands the earliest return I can make—& it is greatly to my satisfaction that I can inform you of my recovery, so as to be about the house again— I tried all in my power, not to have my indisposition noticed—but I struggled in vain, for at last I was obliged to go to bed, & lie there for three days— I told William not to tell you how sick I...
I went Yesterday to hear D r Priestley, in the Philosophical Hall of the University and there I met unexpectedly with D r Euwing and D r Andross or Andrews. Euwing Seems paralytic and falling very fast. The Drift of the Discourse was to shew the Superiour moral Tendency of the Jewish and Christian Religions, to that of all the Pagan Rituals ancient and modern. The Weather is moderated. I hope...