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This Morning I received yours of the 26th. Ult. It is the first I have received from you, and except one from Gen. Palmer of the 28th. it is the first I have received from our State. Yours made me very happy. Dont be uneasy about my Waiter. He behaves very well to me, and he has not the least Appearance of a Spy or a Deserter. He has not Curiosity, nor Activity nor sense enough for such a...
Yesterday, I had the Pleasure of dining with Mr. Purveyance. There are two Gentlemen of this Name in Baltimore, Samuel and Robert, eminent Merchants, and in Partnership. We had a brillant Company, the two Mrs. Purveyances, the two Mrs. Lees, the Ladies of the two Colonels R ichard H enry and F rancis , Mrs. H ancock and Miss Katy Quincy , and a young Lady that belongs to the Family. If this...
For once I have followed the Example of my Friend, and have Long delayed a Reply to her Letter. And though I Cannot Complain of my Eyes as an Excuse, yet I have other Weaknesses to plead that are more than a Ballence, and to say Nothing of the Intelectual system, the Weakness of my Constitution, the Febleness of my Limbs, and the pains in my spirits , for several months past is sufficient to...
I am returned in tolerable Health to this Town—have received but one Letter from you since I left you, that which you sent by Mr. Rice. If you send Letters to Coll. Warren, or your Unkle Smith, they will be conveyed, with safety. I hope the Post Office will be upon a better footing soon. An Army is gathering in the Jerseys. They have frequent Skirmishes, and the Enemy generally come off second...
The President who is just arrived from Baltimore, came in a few Minutes ago and delivered me, yours of Feb. 8, which he found at Susquehannah River, on its way to Baltimore. It gives me great Pleasure to find that you have received so many Letters from me, altho I knew they contained nothing of importance. I feel a Restraint in Writing like that which you complain of, and am determined to go...
Yours of Feb. 12. received this day. I have begged a Bundle of Newspapers, to inclose. They contain some Intelligence. I am pretty well, after all my fatiguing Journeys. The C ongre ss are in as good a Temper as ever I knew them—more spirited and determined than ever. The Southern Battallions are not full. But are in a good Way. Rejoice to learn that Measures are taking to send along the...
Congress has been sitting several Days and proceeding upon Business. I have been in Town above a Week and have spent much of my Time, in making Inquiries after the cheapest Places in Town for Board and stabling. I have at last removed my Horses from a stable at six and six Pence a Night, to another at three dollars a Week each. So that for the future I am to pay only six dollars a Week for Hay...
The Spring advances, very rapidly, and all Nature will soon be cloathed in her gayest Robes. The green Grass, which begins to shew itself, here, and there, revives in my longing Imagination my little Farm, and its dear Inhabitants. What Pleasures has not this vile War deprived me of? I want to wander, in my Meadows, to ramble over my Mountains, and to sit in Solitude, or with her who has all...
The Post now comes regularly, once a Week, and brings me the Boston News Papers, but no Letters from Penns Hill or its Environs. How do you do? Anxious, faint, melancholly? Chear up—dont be distressed. We shall see many good days yet, I hope. I derive a secret Pleasure from a Circumstance which I suppose at present occasions the most of your Apprehensions. I wish I could know more...
“A Plott! a Plott! an horrid Plott, Mr. A.” says my Barber, this Morning.—“It must be a Plott 1. because there is British Gold in it. 2. because there is a Woman in it. 3. because there is a Jew in it. 4. because I dont know what to make of it.” The Barber means, that a Villain was taken up, and examined Yesterday, who appears by his own Confession to have been employd by Lord Howe and Jo....
I know not the Time, when I have omitted to write you, so long. I have received but three Letters from you, since We parted, and these were short ones. Do you write by the Post? If you do there must have been some Legerdemain. The Post comes now constantly once a Week, and brings me News Papers, but no Letters. I have ventured to write by the Post, but whether my Letters are received or not, I...
Yesterdays Post brought me your kind Favour of March 8. 9. 10, with a Letter inclosed for from each of my Sons. But where is my Daughters Letter? That is missing. I regret the Loss of it much. You think I dont write Politicks enough! Indeed I have a surfeit of them. But I shall give you now and then a Taste, since you have such a Goust for them. By a Letter of 17. Jany. Dr. Franklin, Mr. Deane...
As you seem so inquisitive about Politicks, I will indulge you so far (indulge, I say, observe that Word indulge! I suppose you will say it ought to have been oblige) as to send you a little more News from abroad. As foreign Affairs are now become more interesting to Us than ever, I dare say your political Curiosity has extended itself e’er this all over Europe. The Agent of the King of...
You have had many Rumours, propagated among you, which I suppose you know not how to account for. One was, that Congress, the last Summer, had tied the Hands of General Washington, and would not let him fight, particularly on the White Plains. This Report was totally groundless.—Another was, that at last Congress untied the General, and then he instantly fought and conquered at Trenton. This...
This Evening Major Ward deliverd me Yours of 23d. of March.—It is a great Pleasure to me to learn that your Flour has arrived. I begin to have some opinion of my good Fortune. If I could have been certain, of the Vessells escaping the many Snares in her Way, I would have sent a dozen Barrells. The Act, my dear, that you were so fond of will do no good. Legislatures cannot effect...
Yours of 26 March came by this days Post. Am happy to hear you have received so many Letters from me. You need not fear Writing in your cautious Way by the Post, which is now well regulated. But if your Letters should be intercepted, they would do no Harm. The F armer turns out to be the Man, that I have seen him to be, these two Years. He is in total Neglect and Disgrace here. I am sorry for...
Enclosed with this you have a Correspondence, between the two Generals, concerning the Cartell for the Exchange of Prisoners. Washington is in the Right, and has maintained his Argument with a Delicacy, and a Dignity, which do him much Honour. He has hinted, at the flagitious Conduct of the two Howes, towards their Prisoners, in so plain and clear a manner, that he cannot be misunderstood; but...
I have spent an Hour, this Morning, in the Congregation of the dead. I took a Walk into the Potters Field, a burying Ground between the new stone Prison, and the Hospital, and I never in my whole Life was affected with so much Melancholly. The Graves of the soldiers, who have been buryed, in this Ground, from the Hospital and bettering House, during the Course of the last Summer, Fall, and...
We are waiting with some Impatience to hear of the Arrival of some of the Massachusetts Troops at Head Q uarte rs. The Lassitude and Torpor, that has seized our New Englandmen, is to me, very surprizing. Something will happen I believe, to arrouse them from their Lethargy. If they dont go and crush that little Nest of Hornetts at Newport, I shall think them dead to all Sense of Honour, Virtue,...
We have now an ample Representation from N. York. It consists of Six Delegates, and they are to all Appearance, as high, as decisive, and as determined, as any Men ever were, or can be. There is a new Hand, a Mr. Duer, who is a very fine fellow—a Man of sense, Spirit and Activity, and is exceeded by no Man in Zeal. Mr. Duane and Mr. Phillip Livingston, are apparently, as determined as any Men...
The Post brought me two Letters from you, this Morning, one of the 7th. instant, and one before. You seem to be in fine Spirits—I rejoice at it. General Gates has commanded in Philadelphia, untill about a Fortnight ago, he went to Ticonderoga, where he is to command all Summer. Schuyler is here, where he now commands. We are crouding along Soldiers to the General, as fast as they get well of...
My Barber has just left the Chamber. The following curious Dialogue was the Amusement, during the gay Moments of Shaving. Well, Burn, what is the Lye of the day?—Sir, Mr. just told me, that a Privateer from Baltimore, has taken two valuable Prizes, with Sixteen Guns each. I can scarcely believe it.—Have you heard of the Success of the Rattlesnake of Philadelphia, and the Sturdy Beggar of...
I have been lately more remiss, than usual in Writing to you. There has been a great Dearth of News. Nothing from England, nothing from France, Spain, or any other Part of Europe, nothing from the West Indies. Nothing from Howe, and his Banditti, nothing from General Washington. There are various Conjectures that Lord How is dead, sick, or gone to England, as the Proclamations run in the Name...
Your Favours of Ap. 2 and Ap. 7. I have received. The inclosed Evening Post, will give you, some Idea, of the Humanity of the present Race of Brittons. —My Barber, whom I quote as often as ever I did any Authority, says “he has read Histories of Cruelty; and he has read Romances of Cruelty: But the Cruelty of the British exceeds all that he ever read.” For my own Part, I think We cannot dwell...
There is a Clock Calm, at this Time, in the political and military Hemispheres. The Surface is smooth and the Air serene. Not a Breath, nor a Wave. No News, nor Noise. Nothing would promote our Cause more, than Howes March to this Town. Nothing quickens and determines People so much, as a little Smart.—The Germans, who are numerous and wealthy in this state and who have very imperfect Ideas of...
This days Post brought me yours of 17th. inst. and Miss Nabbys obliging Favour of the 16. This young Lady writes a very pretty Hand, and expresses her Thoughts with great Propriety. I shall hardly excuse Miss from writing to me, so long as I have done, now I find she can write so well. I shall carefully preserve her Letter and if she neglects to write me frequently I shall consider this Letter...
We have a fine Piece of News this Morning of the March of 2000 of the Enemy, and destroying a fine Magazine there—and the stupid sordid cowardly torified Country People let them pass without Opposition. All New England is petrified, with Astonishment, Horror, and Despair, I believe in my Conscience. They behave worse than any Part of the Continent. Even in N. Jersy 2000 Men could not have...
This is King Tammany’s Day. Tammany was an Indian King, of this Part of the Continent, when Mr. Penn first came here. His Court was in this Town. He was friendly to Mr. Penn and very serviceable to him. He lived here among the first settlers for some Time and untill old Age and at last was burnt. Some say he lived here with Mr. Penn when he first came here, and upon Mr. Pens Return he heard of...
We have promoted Arnold, one Step this day, for his Vigilance, Activity, and Bravery, in the late Affair at Connecticutt. —We shall make Huntingdon a Brigadier, I hope. We shall sleep in a whole Skin for some Time I think in Philadelphia, at least untill a strong Reinforcement arrives. I want to learn, where Sir William Erskine with his Two Thousand Men, went after his Exploit at...
Inclosed with this you have an Evening Post, containing some of the tender Mercies of the Barbarians to their Prisoners. If there is a Man, Woman or Child in America, who can read these Depositions, without Resentment, and Horror, that Person has no soul or a very wicked one. Their Treatment of Prisoners, last Year added to an Act of Parliament, which they have made to enable them to send...