Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail"
Results 1-10 of 1,550 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I received yesterday your letter and package by Capt. White, and have received the account of the last resolution of the house to disband the army. I think the jacobins have now reason to exult, at out-manœuvering the federalists, as it appears they do upon every occasion. The federalists deserve every thing that will happen to them for their apathy. The next thing I expect to hear is that...
I received last Evening your Letter of the 3 d inst— I began to think you had almost forgotten me. now and then I hear from you by persons who have seen you— they tell me that you appear to enjoy your health the weather grows so severe that I am almost discourage from thinking of quiting my own fire side. M r Smith does not find it convenient at present to Leave his official and private...
Yesterday afternoon Mr. V——handed me your letter. I am sorry that you were prevented from communicating your farther sentiments, as I wished to know them fully. I presume you do not propose the question, “whether I would consent to your leaving this country without me,” with an intention of being influenced by my reply, if you did, I confess I should not know what to determine. I had rather go...
I wrote you a hasty letter from New-York, just to acknowledge the receipt of yours, No. 5, the week before last; since which I have not heard from you, nor have I had an opportunity to write. * * * * * * * Pennsylvania has already appointed her Senators, who are Mr. Morris and a Mr. McLain. Poor —— is, then, disappointed; for he went home to make interest for himself, as it was said. There are...
Receiv’d of M rs Adams one hundred dollars in Payment for a Portrait painted by me RC ( Adams Papers ). For Stuart’s portrait of AA , see Descriptive List of Illustrations, No. 6, above.
I rose this morning with a fair prospect of landing before night, but alas, we are immersed in fogs and darkness. We have been within a few hours sail of New-York, for several days; but fogs, calms, and contrary winds, have deprived us of the happiness of seeing our native land; it is a most mortifying situation. I hope you have not known from experience to what a degree it is teasing; but...
I have this moment received your Letter of the 26 th and having a Leasure moment I embrace it to reply to it— it seems to renew my spirits to get a Letter from you—and they very frequently require the aid of such incidents as arrise from Communicated friendship to keep them up—for I find it very solitary— I have no inclination to go out, and except to M rs King I have not made any visits out...
It is with very great pleasure that I address you, my dear mamma, from this place again. You will be as agreeably surprised as our friends here were, the evening before the last, to see us, and find us safe at New-York; for our arrival was wholly unexpected to them. We avoided informing our friends of our intentions, knowing that their anxious solicitude for our safety would render them...
I received, on Wednesday last, from the hands of Mr. T——, your letter, No. 4, of August 25th. He was so obliging as to call with it himself, in company with Mr. King. * * * Mr. George Storer came out last evening to pass Sunday with us, and by him I propose to forward my letter. He is very civil in forwarding letters for me, and is disposed to be sociable; I am glad that he is pleased with his...
I am in such a situation that I cannot see the way clear for you to come on, till some resolution is passed in the House.— You will be as ready as you can, and I will write you the Moment to come on . any Thing is done.— I will resign my office rather than bring you here to be miserable. Yours eternally RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “M rs Adams / Braintree.”