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We are lodged in our old Chamber at Amsterdam, and Sleep as soundly as if there were not a dozen houses plundered every night. The two nights before the last were very Seditious. last night was quiet, and the Precautions which Secured the Peace then, will be continued, so t[hat] all will be still.— dont be anxious for Us, nor believe half the Reports that will be circulated. Such Events are...
I rec d. Yesterday your kind favour of the 11 th. I have not been able lately to write you so much as I wished. The President has appointed M r Jay to go to England as Envoy Extraordinary, in hopes that Satisfaction may be obtained for the Injuries done us in the Capture of our Vessells. I have no very Sanguine hopes of his Success, but if any Man can Succeed I presume he is as likely as any....
I have sent you Things from Bilbao, by Captain Babson, and a small present by the M. de la Fayette, another by Mr. Lee, another by Mr. Wharton, and shall send another by Mr. Brown, another by Mr. Izard, and perhaps another by the Viscount de Noailles, and the Alliance will bring you and your Neighbours, what you and they wrote for. I intend to tax every Gentleman who goes from here, towards...
I had Yesterday the Pleasure of yours of January 5. I will Send, to M r Adams a Check upon the Branch Bank for two hundred Dollars as soon as I can get Thomas to transact the Business for me. I am glad to find that you have had Applications for the Farms— I wish you to hear them all and enquire their Characters and Circumstances We are all of Us here, very much concerned for Cheesman. he has...
I wish the new Year may be the happiest of your Life. Last Night I had a Visit from D r Rush, whose Tongue ran for an hour.— So many Compliments, so many old Anecdotes. To be Sure, My Election he Said, he had vast pleasure in assuring me Since it had been made certain had given vast Satisfaction in this City and State. Even those who had voted for another had a great Affection for me. M r...
Lee is at York, and We have requested a Battalion of Philadelphian Associators, together with a Regiment of Jersey Minute Men, to march to his Assistance. Lord Sterling was there before with his Regiment, so that there will be about 1000 Men with Lee from Connecticutt, about 600 with Ld. Sterling from the Jerseys, one Battalion of about 720 Minute Men from Jersey and one of the same No. from...
Yesterday I came to Senate as usual on a monday morning pleasing my Imagination and my heart with the hope and Expectation of a Letter from—my dearest Friend. No Letter for The Vice President Says Mathers! All Day in bad humour—dirty Weather—wet walking—nothing good—nothing right. The poor Post Offices did not escape—it was some blunder—some carlessness of theirs—in Philadelphia—New York or...
We have lived thro the Heat, and Toil, and Confusion of this Week. We have tried three of the Kennebeck Proprietors Actions and have been fortunate enough to obtain them all. Mr. Bowdoins great Case with Lord Edgcumbe, and Dr. Gardiners great Cause with William Tyng the sherriff of this County particularly. There are about 60 or 70 Actions now remaining on the Dockett, and When we shall get...
I received to day, together, your Favours of the 31 st December 1796 and 1. Jan. 1797 Our H. of R. boasts that We are the most enlightened People in the World: but We behave like the most ignorant Babies, in a thousand Instances. We have been destroying all Terror of Crimes and are becoming the Victims of them. We have been destroying all Attachment and Obligation to Country and are Sold in...
Yesterday by Major Osgood I had the Pleasure of a Letter from Mr. Palmer, in which he kindly informed me of your and the Familys Welfare. This is the first Intelligence I have had from Braintree since I left it—not a Line from you. Am sorry to learn that Braintree People are alarmed—hope they will not be attacked. Want to know the Particulars—how they have been threatned &c. Thomas is made a...
Since the Certainty has arrived of the very honourable Reelection of our Friend M r Smith of S. Carolina, the wiser Part of the Community have been the more anxious for that of M r Ames. The Orrery from Boston, which arrived Yesterday has excited great Expectations, that the District in which Boston is placed, will not disgrace itself by disgracing Sound Principles and independent Conduct in...
Yesterday I attended the Dedication of a Temple. The Presbyterian Congregation in Market Street, have taken down their old Meeting House, and erected a new one, in the Same Place, much larger higher, more light, airy and elegant. They assembled in it for the first time, Yesterday, when D r Ewing preached in the Morning and D r Blair in the Afternoon. I recollected with Pleasure upon this...
as soon as your Letter informed Us that M rs Brisler could not come without her husband I sent him off, in two hours, the day before Yesterday, i.e Monday. There has been Such a snow storm ever since that he must have had a bad Journey to N. York— Whether he will wait there for a Wind for Rhode Island or take the stage I know not but hope he will get home before you come away. This days Post...
I had a most charming Packett from you and my young Correspondents, to day. I am very happy, to learn that you have done such great Things in the Way of paying Debts. I know not what would become of me, and mine, if I had not such a Friend to take Care of my Interests in my Absence. You will have Patience with me this Time, I hope, for this Time will be the last. I shall stay out this Year, if...
I am much concerned least you should feel an Addition to your Anxieties, from your having so seldom heard from me. But I pray you to dismiss all Concern about me. I am happier far than I was before the Adjournment. My Health is better, and Business and Conversation are much more to my Taste. The surprizing Intelligence We have in private Letters concerning the Director of the Hospital, has...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
The enclosed Newspapers will communicate to you, all the News I know. The Weather here begins to be very hot. Poor Mortals pant and sweat, under the burning Skies. Faint and feeble as children, We seem as if We were dissolving away. Yet We live along. The two Armies are now playing off their Arts. Each acts with great Caution. Howe is as much afraid of putting any Thing to Hazard as...
This moment returning from Mr Bridgen where I had been to deliver him a Letter to you, written this Morning I found your very agreable favour of the 23. Am very glad you are so well Situated, So much pleased with your Journey, and present Accommodation. Dont be solicitous about me. I shall do very well—if I am cold in the night, and an additional quantity of Bed Cloaths will not answer the...
I arrived here, last Evening, and have attended Mr. Strongs Meeting all this Day. I rode alone, all the Way to this Place. Here I found my worthy Brothers Hancock and Adams. Cushing, We hear, spends this Day at Windham, and has sent us Word that he will join us here, tomorrow.—Mr. Paine is here too.—All well. We have good Accounts from N. York and N. Ca rolina —very good. I have no Doubts now...
General Lincoln setts out Tomorrow, and I should not dare to let him go without a Love Letter to you. After a November December and January the fairest softest and finest that ever were known in this Place, The Month of February has been ushered in by a considerable Snow: but the Weather is again so fine that the sun will soon restore Us the naked ground: I should like it better in its White...
I rec d your favour of the 9 th. Yesterday. The Weather is now extream Cold. The River is frozen and a snow covers the Ground. If the Season is as sharp and at the Same time so fine with you, it will present a good Opportunity to cross the Mill Pond. It was judicious Advice and a prudent determination to cutt your Wood this Winter from the Mountain: and I hope you will pursue your Plan of...
Inclosed with this you have an Evening Post, containing some of the tender Mercies of the Barbarians to their Prisoners. If there is a Man, Woman or Child in America, who can read these Depositions, without Resentment, and Horror, that Person has no soul or a very wicked one. Their Treatment of Prisoners, last Year added to an Act of Parliament, which they have made to enable them to send...
Yesterday I had your favour of 16. M r Osgoods sermon has been printed here. I have heard M r Gardiner, hinted at as the Writer of the Jacobiniad— some think M r Paine himself writes it. I am sorry for M r Cleverlys Mortification and think the Cause of it might have been avoided. I am Still afraid I shall not be able to get away, so soon as I once hoped.— I will Spend as much time as I can...
We have no News here, except what We get from your Country. The Privateers act with great Spirit, and are blessed with remarkable Success. Some Merchant ships are arrived this Week from Maryland. They were first chased by Men of War, in attempting to get into Cheasapeak Bay—they run from them and attempted Delaware Bay— there they were chased again. Whereupon they again shifted their Course...
Have you seen a List of the Addressers of the late Governor? There is one abroad, with the Character, Profession or Occupation of each Person against his Name. I have never seen it but Judge Brown says, against the Name of Andrew Fanuil Phillips, is “Nothing,” and that Andrew when he first heard of it said, “Better be nothing with one Side, than every Thing with the other.”—This was witty and...
When a Man is seated, in the Midst of forty People some of whom are talking, and others whispering, it is not easy to think, what is proper to write. I shall send you the News-Papers, which will inform you, of public Affairs, and the particular Flickerings of Parties in this Colony. I am happy to learn from your Letter, that a Flame is at last raised among the People, for the Fortification of...
This Morning We crossed the North River at Poughkeepsie, on the Ice, after having ridden many Miles on the East side of it to find a proper Place. We landed at New Marlborough, and passed through that and Newborough Newburgh to New Windsor, where We dined. This Place is nearly opposite to Fish kill, and but little above the Highlands, where Fort Constitution and Fort Montgomery stand. The...
The Die is cast, and you must prepare yourself for honourable Tryals. I must wait to know whether Congress will do any Thing or not to furnish my House— if they do not I will have no House before next Fall. and then a very moderate one, with very moderate Furniture. The Prisoners from Algiers arrived Yesterday in this City, in good health and looking very well. Capt n. stevens is among them....
The Lyars Stick at nothing. The Paragraphs in the enclosed Paper, which respect me, are impudent Forgeries. So far from thinking that the French never meant to treat, I have been long of opinion that the English never meant to treat, and that the French, from the Sincerity of their Desire to treat, have given a too ready Attention to Maneuvres of the English which have been only insidious...
D r Blair has resigned and D r Green is our Chaplain, but Miss Blair is married to M r Roberdeau the Bearer of this Letter, son of my old Friend the General. There is an universal and respectful Inquiry after you and your health, and as general a respect and Attention shewn to me. The Savages who shoot from the Swamps and thickets, from the Brakes and Briars from the Mud and Dirt, are all...