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Mr. Winthrop, Mr. Quincy and I came this Morning from York, before Breakfast, 15 Miles, in order to hear my learned Friend Hemmenway. Mr. Quincy brought me a Letter from Williams, in which he lets me know that you and the Family were well. This is very refreshing News. We went to Meeting at Wells and had the Pleasure of hearing My Friend, upon “Be not Partaker’s in other Mens Sins: Keep...
The Riding has been so hard and rough, and the Weather so cold that We have not been able to push farther than this Place. My little Colt has performed very well hitherto, and I think will carry me through the Journey, very pleasantly. Our Spirits have been cheered, by two or three Pieces of good News, which Commissary Trumble who is now with me, tells us, he saw Yesterday in a Letter from G...
The Disappointment you mention was not intended, but quite accidental. A Gentleman, for whom I had much Esteem, Mr. Daniel Leonard of Norton, was so good as to offer to keep the sabbath with me at Braintree—a favour that would have been very agreable if it had not detained me from the most agreable of all Company, to me, in this world, and a favour that will I know be sufficient with you to...
When I left Paris, the 8 March, I expected to have been at Home before this Day and have done my Utmost to get to sea, but the Embarrassements and Disappointments I have met with, have been many, very many. I have however in the Course of them had a fine Opportunity of seeing Nantes, L’orient and Brest, as well as the intermediate Country. By the gracious Invitation of the King, I am now to...
I shall inclose with this, some Letters between Randolph and Hammond which will shew you how quarelsome they are. Poor Fellows! They both desire Peace, but think themselves obliged to wrangle for their Countries. It is fashionable to charge Wars upon Kings: but I think Le Peuple souvereign is as inflamable, and as proud and at the Same time less systematick, uniform & united: so that it is not...
Yesterday Morning I took a Walk, into Arch Street, to see Mr. Peele’s Painters Room. Peele is from Maryland, a tender, soft, affectionate Creature. . . . He shewed me a large Picture containing a Group of Figures, which upon Inquiry I found were his Family. His Mother, and his Wifes Mother, himself and his Wife, his Brothers and sisters, and his Children, Sons and Daughters all young. There...
I have paid Turner, his Wages up to this day, and settled all Accounts with him. Besides which I have given him £3:2s:od. L.M. towards his Expences home. When he arrives he is to produce his Account to you, of the Expences of his Journey. See that he produces Receipts from the Tavern Keepers. Dont pay a Farthing, but what he produces a Receipt for. I am glad he is going, for between you and me...
I have been so diligent on the Road and so much interrupted by Company at the Taverns that this is the first time I have been able to get an opportunity to write to you. We arrived at this house last night (Saturday) Shall rest here to day and go into N. York tomorrow.— at Hartford, the Manufacturers presented me with a Piece of Broadcloth, for a Suit of Cloaths. at N. Haven the Corporation...
This is one of my red Letter Days. It is the Anniversary of the Signature of the Declaration of an Armistice between The U.S. and G. Britain, in 1783.— There are Several of these Days in my Calandar, which I recollect as they pass in review, but which nobody else remembers. And indeed it is no otherwise worth my while to remember them than to render an Ejaculation of Gratitude to Providence...
I have nothing to write you at this moment but Scandal, and that about one of our Connections and Acquaintances, in whose Character and Fortunes Several of our near Relations and kind Friends are deeply interested for which Reason I write in Confidence and pray that Calumny if it is such may not be propagated from me nor in my name. It is reported here in Company of senators and others of...
I am now Settled.— The first night I went to a M r Alders, opposite to M r Binghams, but not liking the circumstance of living in an English Family an Upholsterer lately emigrated and not admiring the Rooms, I removed last night to Francis’s Hotel in 4 th. Street, between Market and Chesnut Streets. Here I Shall be at School with a Society of Patriotic Members of Congress who are all, virtuous...
By the Post of Yesterday I received your kind Letter of the 4 th. of this month, and, by it, was relieved from a great Anxiety on Account of your health and that of Louisa. The News from the orchard is also very pleasant, I wish I could hear as good News from Hancocks Meadow. A Covering would keep it warm But I leave all to your better Judgment. No senate Yet.— M rs Morris by her son has...
I told you, in a former Letter, that I lodged at Gen. Roberdeau’s. This Gentleman is of French Extraction, his Father was a rich Planter of the Island of St. Christophers, where my Friend was born, and where he has or had an Estate. He has large Property in England, in Virginia, in Philadelphia, in York Town and in various other Parts of Pensilvania. He has also large Property in our American...
A Gentleman, Mr. Boardman of Newbury Port, is going, and by him I send you a few Lines. In England nothing is talked of, but Admiral Keppell, whom they are daily trying by a Court Martial. His Defence, I suppose is our security, viz. the shattered Condition of their Navy. They are almost ripe for cutting each others Throats to all Appearance, yet they are about sending Reinforcements to...
I believe I shall set off for Paris next Fryday. Mr. Thaxter and Mr. Storer will go with me. The Treaty of Commerce and the Convention respecting recaptures were Signed on the 8 of this Month, and they go by this and Several other Opportunities. I hope they will give Satisfaction. Mr. Jay writes me that on the 28 of Septr. that the Day before Mr. Oswald received a Commission to treat with the...
Yesterday, by the Post, I received yours of Septr. 25th., and it renewed a Grief and Anxiety, that was before almost removed from my Mind. Two days before I had the Pleasure of a very valuable Letter from Coll. Quincy, in which he kindly informed me that you and Our Family were so much better that you and my dear Nabby, had made a Visit at his House: and Mr. Williams, who brought the Letter...
It would give Pleasure to every Body your Way but the few, unfeeling Tories, to see what a Spirit prevails here. The Allarm which How was foolish enough to spread by his March out of Brunswick, raised the Militia of the Jersies universally, and in this City it united the Whiggs, to exert themselves under their new Militia Law, in such a Degree that nobody here was under any Apprehensions of...
This day I received yours of the first of March from Bilbao, with the Journals &c.—the Postage of this Packet, is prodigious. I would not Advise to send many Journals, or Newspapers, this Way, or by Holland, but cut out pieces of Newspapers, and give me an Account of any Thing particularly interesting in the Journals, in your Letters, by such Conveyances, and send large Packetts of Journals...
I have, this minute rec d your favour of the 22 d. The Report of the Presidents Resignation is probably designed to prevent the Rise of the Stocks: but the Insolence which appears every day in Baches and Freneaus Papers, proceeding from the Same Persons who are tired of abusing me, may be carried to a point that he will not bear. He has not been used to such threshing and his skin is thinner...
On Saturday I Saw our sons Letter to the Secretary of State. M r Randolph expressed his intire Satisfaction in it. Said “it was a justification of the Propriety of his appointment, a Presage of his future Usefulness: and well digested, well arranged and well connected.” a handsome Compliment. In this Letter he says M r Jay had shewn him the whole Negotiation with Britain— He Speaks very...
This is King Tammany’s Day. Tammany was an Indian King, of this Part of the Continent, when Mr. Penn first came here. His Court was in this Town. He was friendly to Mr. Penn and very serviceable to him. He lived here among the first settlers for some Time and untill old Age and at last was burnt. Some say he lived here with Mr. Penn when he first came here, and upon Mr. Pens Return he heard of...
Monsieur Chaumont has just informed me of a Vessell bound to Boston: but I am reduced to such a Moment of Time, that I can only inform you that I am well, and inclose a few Lines from Johnny, to let you know that he is so. I have ordered the Things you desired, to be sent you, but I will not yet say by what Conveyance, for fear of Accidents. If human Nature could be made happy by any Thing...
I thank you for presenting a Barrell of Flour to my Mother, and wish you to do every Thing for her Comfort, that lies in your Power. My Duty to her.— Ames is not here nor is any other Vessell bound to Boston. We shall send more Flour as soon as there is Opportunity. I am glad to hear that at length after 5 or 6 Years meditation you have made your Visit to M rs Miller and M rs Vezey. I am...
Mobs are the trite Topick of Declamation and Invective, among all the ministerial People, far and near. They are grown universally learned in the Nature, Tendency and Consequences of them, and very eloquent and pathetic in descanting upon them. They are Sources of all kinds of Evils, Vices, and Crimes, they say. They give Rise to Prophaneness, Intemperance, Thefts, Robberies, Murders, and...
Mr. Church setts off, tomorrow Morning. I have sent this Morning by Mr. William Winthrop, about half a dozen Letters containing Papers &c. Have nothing new to write. We have been very busily engaged for 4 or 5 days in procuring Assistance for Boston. Congress has at last voted three Additional Battallions for Boston and that the five old ones be filled up, and We shall send you a Major General...
After a March like that of Hannibal over the Alps We arrived last Night at this Place, Where We found the Utmost Difficulty to get Forage for our Horses, and Lodgings for ourselves, and at last were indebted to the Hospitality of a private Gentleman Coll. Brinkhoff Brinckerhoff , who very kindly cared for Us. We came from Hartford through Farmington, Southington, Waterbury, Woodbury, New...
I am lodged at M r Otis’s and am personally well accommodated: but I am So little pleased with living alone at any Lodgings, that this shall be the last time. You must come to me another Year or I will come to you. I am convinced if you were now here you would again be sick for the damp and chill is very penetrating. Next fall, I hope your health will be better. How the Election is gone I know...
I wrote you last Week and inclosed an order for 600. Let me know when you receive it. Although the Weather is the most beautiful I ever knew in December, the Time Seems longer to me, than ever any time did in America— The Business of Congress this session is Dulness Flatness and Insipidity itself. M r Cranch went off, on Fryday for Washington as he intended to go to Anapolis, I gave him a...
Your two Letters concerning Mr. T yler are never out of my Mind. He is of a very numerous Family and Connection in Boston who have long had great Influence in that Town and therefore if his Education has been regular to the Bar, as it must have been if he followed his Studies regularly, under two Such Masters as Mr. Dana and Mr. Angier, if he has been admitted and Sworn with the Consent and...
I think I have sometimes observed to you in Conversation, that upon examining the Biography of illustrious Men, you will generally find some Female about them in the Relation of Mother or Wife or Sister, to whose Instigation, a great Part of their Merit is to be ascribed. You will find a curious Example of this, in the Case of Aspasia, the Wife of Pericles. She was a Woman of the greatest...