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A kind note at the foot of mr Adams’s letter of July 15. reminds me of the duty of saluting you with friendship and respect; a duty long suspended by the unremitting labors of public engagement, and which ought to have been sooner revived, since I am become proprietor of my own time. and yet so it is, that in no course of life have I been ever more closely pressed by business than in the...
I have received your letter of the 1st. instant. Altho’ I have not learned that Mr. Adams has yet signified to the Department of State his wish to return from the Mission to St. Petersburg, it is sufficiently ascertained by your communication, as well as satisfactorily explained by the considerations suggested. I have accordingly desired the Secretary of State to let him understand that as it...
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieved, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it: perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. with those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive....
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. my charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796. I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
I have had the pleasure to receive your very kind letter of the 14 th of Feb. at Baltimore, for which I pray you to receive the grateful offerings of an honest heart. I should not have neglected answering it, till this late date, had I not been uncommonly occupied in business, and had nothing to tell you, but what I wrote to Mr. Adams, whose letters I presume you have seen Soon after you left...
I have a thousand times wish’d to express to you my gratitude for the attentions I received from you during your residence here; and most particularly, for your kindness to my dear mother and family during her late severe illness; but a consciousness of the inadequacy insufficiency of language to give a faithful representation of my feelings, has hitherto imposed upon me a silence which I fear...
Saturday night 9 O Clock and not before I rec d yours of 13 th. and the Letter to Thomas with it, brought here no doubt by mistake. I regret very much that you have not a Gentleman with you. The Skittish young Colt with you, is always timorous, but no harm will befall you or her I trust. The Weather and roads here, on Saturday Sunday and to day are the finest We have seen this year. The...
I have received your letters of the & 3 d : inst ts : and thank you for them— I shall agree with Fielding for the Coachee and attend to the conveniences you mention. I can suggest no method for your coming to this place, unless by taking a carriage from Washington, which might be sent back by Stage-horses. Barney, of Georgetown, would most probably contract with you for one— I am so fortunate...
It was with great Pleasure that I recognized the well known Hand writing, which it is so many years since I have seen. It was impossible not to avail myself of the Contents of the Note I found in the President’s Letter, in some prefatory Remarks which you will read in the Gazette, I have taken the Liberty to send you. Chagrined as I am with a late Event which has furnished so noble a Triumph...
Your kind letter of the 25 th : inst t : came by this day’s Mail. I have found a Coachee ready made, at Fielding’s for sale, which, with the alterations that can with ease & despatch be made, will, I think, answer your purpose exactly. The body of the Coachee is somewhat shorter & more in the form of a Coach, than that you have, but it is well put together & the wheels & carriage appear to be...
I have just clos’d a long Letter to sister Peabody from whom I reciev’d one last week— Tis the first I have written to her Since I was Sick She is well herself but mr Peabody has been More unwell than Since they were married ha Sore in his ear attended with great pain in his Neck he is better, & got out again— I hope you my dear Sister are well of your cold, but your troubles must be great...
Our Supreme Court being in session, has occupied my time so much as to prevent answering your favors of the 10 th : & 13 th : inst ts : I have seen M rs : Kirkham since I got your letter, and given her the fresh order; she will prepare the articles & I shall send them as soon as I can. I have applied to two Coachmakers to ascertain what you desired; neither of them have any ready made coachees...
With the most timid respect do I address M rs : Adams on a subject so interesting to me that I tremble while I write from a doubt of the propriety of the step, however solicitude for an affectionate Husband and our young family outweighs my scuples and prompts me to the measure. I must therefore rely upon the noble generosity of a character I have known and revered from my infancy, to pardon...
Not one word have I heard from my Dear Sister, since I left Boston, nor have I had any intelligence from Washington excepting what we have gathered by the News Papers, & those we have read with a peculiar degree of anxiety. My mind as well as the publicks, has been long held in painful suspense, nor do we yet know but that he , who has been the stability of Our Times, may again preside, &...
I last week receiv’d your first Letter from the city of Washington. I began to grow impatient not to receive one Line neither from you nor My Son, but last thursdays mail brought yours & one from him to his Father. I had heard of your arrival by mr Brislers Letter to his wife. but I wanted to hear your own account of your journey. I receiv’d your two Letters Written upon the road & thank you...
I rec d last night your Letter of the 11 th. Your Girls and M r shipley arrived in good health and Spirits. I shall Send the Charriot this morning to meet you. It would be a great pleasure to me to go in it, but I am so engaged in indispensable business that I know not how to leave it and another thing of some importance is your Son may take a seat with you & Suzan in the Charriot and that...
I have the great Happiness of informing you that M rs. Cranch remains better. Her Boyls, with which she was much troubled, are broke and have discharg’d matter that I hope will be salutary. She received your most kind and affectionate Letter from New Haven of the 2 d Inst t : We are glad to hear you got so far safe, and hope our great Preserver will be with you still, and keep you from every...
welcome thou best of women thou best of Sisters thou kindest of Friends the Soother of ever human woe to the city of Washington. welome to the best of men welcome to a Nephew & neice who Love honor, & respects you take their Sweet ofspring to your benevolent Bosom & say to thus would your Grandmama do if she could hold you in her arms.— I tremble I can scarcly hold my pen other must tell you...
We arrived here last night, or rather yesterday at one O Clock and here We dined and Slept. The Building is in a State to be habitable. And now We wish for your Company. The Account you give of the melancholly state of our dear Brother M r Cranch and his family is really distressing and must Severely afflict you. I most cordially Sympathize with you and them. I have Seen only M r Marshall and...
I have the happiness of informing you that your Sister Cranch, is much better than when you went away. Your Mantle has fallen on M rs. Black, who with a Sister’s tenderness has attended to the preparing of the Wine Whey, and doing every thing for her that the warmest Friendship can dictate. The rest of our Family are growing better but slowly. A young Man at M r : Jn o. Newcomb’s and the...
I have received your favors of the 10 th : & 12 th : inst ts : and am highly gratified by their contents; excepting the bill of health, which is less cheering than I could wish it might have been. I have been so occupied with attendance upon Courts and writing to my correspondents in Europe, during the last ten days, that I have not found time to write you; & the expectation of William’s...
By the post on the 9 th instant I intruded a hasty line upon you, upon a reference Tench Coxe had made to me upon the subject of M r Adam’s political principles. I wrote to M r Coxe on the same day to demand justice from him for the injury he had done me. His publication has been contradicted as far as it relates to me in several of our papers. Tomorrow an Avowal of what I wrote to you a few...
I now enclose you my Brother’s letter of July the 10 th : which I promised to transmit by this day’s Mail; but being anxious to see a considerable portion of it in print, & solicited by M r : Dennie to furnish him a copy for the Gazette of the U.S. of Monday next, I could not complete the copy in time for sending, so that I am apprehensive you will not receive it until after the President’s...
I have your favor of the 26 th : ult o : with an enclosure; with what I paid for the servant’s trunk & the cask of wine, the account is just balanced. I have not been called on for any more charges & imagine none are due— The wine I suppose to be a present from Our Consul M r : Willis. I am extremely grieved at the disaster, which has befallen my Cousin Boylston, & which, according to your...
Miss Palmer has given me hopes of your coming, & Mrs Smith to our Exhibition, & says, you say, you will be so good as to carry me home with her— We have a Ball the next night after Exhibition & I suppose my Boarders will not leave me till Friday— We have a charming harmonious family, & are as still, as could be supposed where there are so many Young ones— But if at this time You should see...
I take the liberty of addressing a few lines to you, knowing from the Friendship with which you have honord myself, and Family; that it will not be thought an intrusion by you, and I take leave Madam to assure you that it ever makes me happy to hear of your health, and of the welfare of yourself, and Family, and that this Circle in George street are much intrested at this time, for M r :...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 12 th :, this morning, enclosing a letter from my brother, for the perusal of which I thank you. It is a very long time, since I had any intelligence concerning him, and I feel anxious lest some of his letters or mine should have miscarried on the route. W. Shaw informs me, in his letter of the 11 th : that the State Department has letters dated...
This morning I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 12 th : inst t : and am happy to learn your safe arrival at the hospitable mansion, where I fervently hope, you and my Father, may enjoy days & years of tranquil life. For my own sake & for the sake of all my family, it would, I believe, be a happy circumstance, if there should be no further occasion for either of my parents leaving...
I rec d your favour of the 2 d by M r Dexter and this morning from M r Gerry an account of your health on the 4 th , which have relieved me from Some anxiety as I had rec d no Letter from you Since you were in N. York. I have seen many Cities and fine Places since you left me and particularly Mount Vernon. M rs Washington and her whole Family very kindly enquired after your health and all your...