Adams Papers
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John Adams to Abigail Adams, 1 January 1794

John Adams to Abigail Adams

Philadelphia January 1. 1794

My dearest Friend

I have taken a Sheet of Paper, only to wish you an happy new Year and many happy repetitions of this Aniversary.

I received yesterday a Letter, and Pacquet of his Liberty Papers and Pamphlets from Mr B. Hollis dated 18. Feb. 1793. Where it has been I cannot guess. He Sends his best Wishes to you and hopes you have recovered your health and Spirits.1

I Suppose Columbus has now done with G— I read his Number 5. yesterday.2 The Printers are all Poltroons or they would insert the whole in all their Papers; They are afraid of an Antifoederal Party and of a French Party now associated in one, and very powerful with many Readers of Newspapers. If Genet has by his Conduct made many of them afraid to avow their Attachment to him, they Still avoid giving him offence and will come out in his vindication whenever they think they may with Safety.

Cheesman is not arrived and Brisler is put to more Inconvenience than I am for want of our Trunk. It is feared he is lost, but I still hope he will be heard of, after some time.3 My Duty Love & Compliments where proper

yours this Year as last

J. A.

RC (Adams Papers); endorsed: “Janry 1 1794.”

1Thomas Brand Hollis wrote two letters to JA on 18 Feb. 1793 (both Adams Papers). The first gives Hollis’ analysis of the French Revolution and comments on the popular response to Thomas Paine’s writings in Britain. The second introduces to JA a dissenting minister moving to the United States.

2The fifth installment in JQA’s Columbus series attacking Edmond Genet and defending the revocation of the exequatur of Antoine Charbonnet Duplaine, French vice consul at Boston, appeared in the Boston Columbian Centinel, 21 December. See also vol. 9:469, which mistakenly describes Columbus as containing only four parts.

3For the fate of Capt. Samuel Chesman and his schooner, the General Heath, see vol. 9:493–494.

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