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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 571-587 of 587 sorted by author
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If my dear friend Required only a very Long Letter to make it agreable I Could Easily Gratify her but I know There must be many more Requisits to make it pleasing to her taste. If you Measure by Lines I Can at once Comply, if by Sentiment I fear I shall fall short. But as Curiosity seems to be awake with Regard to the Company I keep and the Manner of spending my time I will Endeavour to...
I know my dear friend Mrs. Adams will be Glad to hear Her friend is in Better Health than when she Left Her. Hope I shall be able to Look Homewards some time Next Week. I Long for my own Retirement, and for the opportunity of seeing and Entertaining my Friend, at my own Habitation. But I know who talks sometimes of Fate. I suppose he means that providence has Its fixed Decrees to which Mortals...
A Lame Hand still prevents me the free use of Either the Nedle or the pen. Yet I take up the Latter and Attempt a Line or two just to Let my Dear Friend know that both myself and Family are in better Health than when she was at Plimouth. I Enclose a Number of papers which Came to hand yesterday from Philadelphia, with Directions to send them to the foot of Pens Hill when Read. I also send...
It is A Long time since I had the Happiness of hearing from my Braintree Friends. Dos my dear Mrs. Adams think I am Indebted a Letter. If she dos Let her Recollect A Moment and she will find she is mistaken. Or is she so wholly Engrossed with the Ideas of her own Happiness as to think Little of the absent. Why should I Interrupt for a moment if this is the Case, the Vivacity and Cheerfulness...
I need not tell you I was much disappointed in not having the pleasure of your Company yesterday and the advocate you Employed to appoligize assures me you were not less so. I promissed to Give it under my hand that to the best of my judgment he had obeyed your orders with great punctuallity. As soon as the Roads will permit I will call on you. Though as your Daughter left you this Morning...
I take up my pen this Morning to let my Friend know I have not yet seen Mr. S. Adams, but understand by Mr. Warren, That Thier is No Expectation in Congress that Your Mr. Adams will Return yet. There is a large Majority of that Body who highly Esteem Him and wish his Continuance in Europe, have an Eye upon him if proposals of accomodation should be made as best qualifyed to Negotiate a peace...
Most sincerly do I Congratulate My Friend on her Restoration to Health after pain, peril and Disappointment. May she Long be spared to her Family and Friends, And be happy in Domestic Life, Though the political sky Looks Dark and Lowry and the Convulsions of War! shake the Lower Creation. You ask My opinion with Regard to affairs in the North. All I Can say is I am Mortifyed and Chagrind at...
I Intended writing my Friend Mrs. Adams when Mr. Thaxter Returned but dare say he Gave you a satisfactory Reason why I did not, since which many matters have taken up my time. The Bussy and the Gloomy scenes have Alternately played before me and Commanded my Attention almost Ever since I left your house with a Heart full of anxiety. I saw my Father no more as my Foreboding Heart presaged. He...
Is my Dear Mrs. Adams too Much Engagd with Company, is her Family sick, or is she inattentive to What Gives pleasure to her Friend, that I have not heard a Word from her since I Left the Capital. How dos my Dear Charles do. I Long to hear if that sweet boy is perfectly Recovered. I felt Great pain in Leaving him so Ill, but as I hear nothing since Conclude he must be better. Has Naby her...
I had the honor of receiving your Letter the last Week handed Me by Mr. Cranch ; accompanied with your Letters for Mr. Adams Which I shall take particular pleasure in Conveying safe.—I shant here Attempt to Discribe my Gratitude to you for your Good Wishes and friendly advice to Me, In which I should fall so far short of what I would wish to express that it would neither give me the...
When I was at Braintree I mentioned to you that I was pretty certain I had a letter from Mr. Adams to you, among my papers which I left behind at N. York and that when my trunk arrived I would carefully examine it and send it to you. I have done so, but without success. I therefore conclude if there was one, the Goths have taken it. We hear there is a Vessel arrived at Boston from Amsterdam;...
For above a fortnight past I have been meditating a visit to Braintree but some unlucky occurrence or other turned up and disappointed me, and now I am certain I shall not be able within a fortnight, owing to some matters in agitation which will not be finished before that time, and are of such a nature that made me wish to see you at this time more particularly. I must explain myself by...
Yesterday I received your very obliging Letter and return you many thanks for your willingness to serve my interest. Some of my friends seemed to wish as I did to have some testimony of how I stood in Mr. Adams’ opinion through you. I prefered it to giving them such letters of his as I had in my hands. However your answer not arriving in time I gave President Willard four letters of Mr....
Mr. Adams gave me real Pleasure when he told me it was in my Power to render any Service to himself or his Family, therefore any Apology from you was needless. The fluctuating or rather the Ebbing State of our paper Medium is such that to exchange More Silver than you may want for a fortnights Use, may be prejudicial—and oftentimes a better bargain may be made with the Silver than any other...
Mr. Cranch deliver’d me your Letter with the five french Guineaus which at the Insurance Office I endeavord to hawk to the Money Voyagers. I found 30 for 1 the most they wou’d offer. Mr. Billy who has purchased much hard Money told me he had offerd him 200 hard Dollars the Day before at that Rate. I have no Doubt that 33 and 35 had been given but the late Reports of a Loan being establishd by...
I am directed by the Corporation to advise you, that the Hon. Mr. Adams, in his Letter favoured by the Hon. A. Lee, informed them, “that you would deliver five Volumes of M. Court de Gébelin’s Monde Primitif with the L’Histoire natural de la Parole for our Library.” M. Gebelin has been pleased to enrich our public Library with that very learned Work. And as Mr. Adams had the five first Volumes...
Near the dusk of last Evening, I was Honored with your Favor, by the hand of the amiable Master Charles Adams, but was unhappy in not having a light ready to know the Contents. The Young Gentleman Seeming in hast, having Company in waiting, prevented my detaining Him. I regret my not having His Company to lodge and the Young Ladies who were with Him, as it would have greatly amusd me in my...