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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I am this day honoured with your favor of the 20th. and an opportunity offering to acknolege it immediately, I do not fail to embrace it. I thank you for the intelligence it contains. You refered me to Mr. Adams for news; but he gives me none; so that I hope you will be so good as to keep that office in your own hands. I get little from any other quarter since the derangement of the French...
Expecting Baron Polnitz to call every moment, I have only time to acknolege the receipt of your favor of Nov. 24. and to answer you on the subject of the bill for 319 livres drawn by Mr. Adams in favor of Mr. Bonfeild. I had never heard of it before, and Mr. Barclay calling on me this morning I asked of him if he knew any thing of it. He says that such a bill was presented to him, and he...
I am almost affraid you do not love me so well as I hoped you did— If you had have known how much you dissappointed me, & my Friends here, in not making us a visit, your benevolence would have induced my Brother, & you, to have surmountd every Obstacle— If I had not felt too great a tenderness for the Parent , I would have told you that your Son was here very Sick, & had alarming Complaints—...
A thousand thanks to you, my dear Madam, for your kind attention to my little daughter. Her distresses I am sure must have been troublesome to you: but I know your goodness will forgive her, and forgive me too for having brought them on you. Petit now comes for her. By this time she will have learned again to love the hand that feeds and comforts her, and have formed an attachment to you. She...
I embrace the Oppertunity by Mr. Guild, of informing You, that Mr. Adams was well the 27th. of July, and that by a Letter to the Minister of France of the 29th, the Dutch Negotiation with the British was finished, by which one great Obstacle to the definitive Treaty is removed. Inclosed is an Extract of an official Letter from Doctor F—to Mr. Livingston Secretary of foreign affairs dated July...
I have the happiness to inform you that we are again settled, in Charleston, we had a Passage of seven weeks, it was as you may suppose, disagreeable, it blew a heavy gale for ten days, & the patience of every person on Board, was exhausted, except our little Boy, who is both, by Sea, & Land, an excellent traveller. When we left London, you intended a visit to Bath, I hope nothing happened to...
I had the happiness of receiving yesterday my daughter in perfect health. among the first things she informed me of was her promise to you, that after she should have been here a little while she would go back to pay you a visit of four or five days. she had taken nothing into her calculation but the feelings of her own heart which beat warmly with gratitude to you. she had fared very well on...
M rs: Copley presents Compliments to M rs: Adams: would have called uppon her this Morning, but that she thinks it must at this time be inconvenient to M rs: Adams: will be very happy if it is consistant with M rs: Adams’s engagements to have the pleasure of her company at Tea in George street before she leaves London: (but least she should not have that pleasure) takes leave to say that her...
By Mr. Cutting I have an opportunity of acknoleging the receipt of your favor of Sep. 10th. inclosing one for my daughter Polly. When she received it she flushed, she whitened, she flushed again, and in short was in such a flutter of joy that she could scarcely open it. This faithful history of her sensibility towards you must stand in lieu of her thanks which she has promised me she will...
s 1785. June 2. To paid Petit 173. 8 Aug. 17. To pd mr Garvey’s bill 96. 16. 6 Nov. To cash by Colo. Smith. 768. 0. 0 1786. Jan. 5. To pd Barin for Suortout de dessert & figures &c 264.
Expecting Baron Polnitz to call every moment, I have only time to acknolege the receipt of your favor of Nov. 24. and to answer you on the subject of the bill for 319 livres drawn by Mr. Adams in favor of Mr. Bonfeild. I had never heard of it before, and Mr. Barclay calling on me this morning I asked of him if he knew any thing of it. He says that such a bill was presented to him, and he...
Very well, Madam; this fine house of the Comte de Rouhaut, spacious Gardens, Courts &c. have seemingly banished from your thoughts humble Basinghall Street . I say seemingly, since I am not willing to believe it really so. Don’t you remember you told me once you wished me to write you, and that you would duly acknowledge my letters? This was, however, when we were in different Quarters of the...
I had the happiness of receiving yesterday my daughter in perfect health. Among the first things she informed me of was her promise to you, that after she should have been here a little while she would go back to pay you a visit of four or five days. She had taken nothing into her calculation but the feelings of her own heart which beat warmly with gratitude to you. She had fared very well on...
I had the Honor of Receiving a letter from you yesterday— we have had such—Boysterous weather Since your Departur from here that for 6 day s. I had the Pilot on board, & he Would not ventur to moove the Ship: but She is Now in the Downes & will be at Portsmouth the first fair wind: I Shall proceed from here so as to get to Portsmouth before the Ship so that my Departure from here will in some...
Yours of Jany. 10 to Mr. Robbins, he shewed me this Moment and informs Me, he goes on Board on Monday. I regret that I have had no earlier Knowledge of this young Gentleman. My son and I have been here, this fortnight, and have been very civilly and obligingly treated, by some private Gentlemen. But this Government? It is a fine Country; but it is undone by Prosperity. It has the Vertigo in...
Understanding by my sister Elworthy, that your Excellency complains of having read yourself out of books, I am tempted to send you down the latest publication that I can find promises amusement enough to justify me; and accordingly I have to intreat your excellency’s acceptance of “Costigan’s view of society and manners in Portugal.” I was just now in hopes to have gratified your excellency...
We have Seen Magnificence, Elegance and Taste enough to excite an Inclination to see more. We conclude to go to Birmingham, per­ haps to the Leasowes, and in that Case shall not have the Pleasure to see you, till Sunday or Monday. Love to my dear Nabby, and to Coll Smith. He will be so good as to give this account of Us, if any Questions are asked. Yours forever RC ( NhD .) JA and Thomas...
Your favour without a Date, just now received and Mr. Jeffersons Arrival, a Month sooner than he expected, have indeed changed my Plan. Stay where you are, and amuse yourself, by Seeing what you can, untill you See me. I will be with you in Eight Days at farthest, and sooner, if possible. I will cross from Helvoet sluis to Harwich, by the Packet of the day after tomorrow if I can. If this is...
I have rec d your favours of the 3 and 13 th and have opened that to our Son, who has been absent from me these 3 Weeks at Newbury, where I Suppose he is very well.— I am as anxious as you are about your coming home. There are but two Ways. 1. if Coll Smith can bring you and his Family with you, will be the more obliging and agreable. 2. if he cannot, I must send your eldest son, with a Coach...
Mr Brand Hollis presents his compliments to Mrs Adams and desires her acceptance of two medals one on the execution of the counts Egmont and Horne two Dutch Patriots contrary to faith-given! The other on the Murder of the first Prince of Orange Base acts of a Tyrant! Three common wealth coins to record, what England once was. Mrs Adams had the only copy of the right hand of Fellowship which...
Mr. Thaxter is arrived with the Definitive Treaty and I have the pleasure of receiving a number of letters from Mr. Adams. I think it will be Indispensably necessary to continue him in Europe, and shall therefore use my best endeavours for this purpose; but can form no Idea of what will be the determenation of Congress on the Occasion, as the Representation of the present year will be very...
If I have failed in my duty untill now, I will differe no longer from emploring my pardon for my neglegence, and to shew you at the same time the sentiments of my perfect remembrance of the many politeness you and your good family have always shown me; and of the perfect esteem, with which I profess myself. I cannot however differe any longer having heard that your husband and family quits...
The anxious Sentiments of a Parent which You have manifested in the close of Your last Letter, I have read with a sympathetic Feeling. It would give me singular Pleasure to have it in my Power to give you such Information as would entirely set your Mind at Ease. I had hopes that Time would have produced such Evidence, as would have removed Doubt. I scarcely know what to say. If the Character...
Your favor of the 7th. was put into my hands the last night and as I received at the same time dispatches from Mr. Adams which occasion a great deal to be done for Congress to be sent by the Mr. Fitzhughs who set out tomorrow morning for Philadelphia as Mr. Preston the bearer of this does for London, I have only time to thank you for your kind attention to my commission and your offer of new...
How dos my dear M rs Adams like the City of New york: its manners & amusements as it may probably be her future residence I hope she found every thing prefectly agreable— shall I hope before you fix in that distant abode that you will make us an Visit at Plimouth: to such a traveler the journey can be nothing. and since that M rs Adams, friendship is unimpaired: I should think (judging from my...
Understanding that through the means of some improper and unjust Conduct in your Servants you have had reason to doubt the honesty of some of your Trades-people and as such have come to a determination of changing them. I beg leave to observe, that, truly sensible of my own Integrity throughout the whole time I have had the satisfaction of serving you, the very first moment that I heard of...
I wrote you Yesterday, that I had executed the Contract and should return to England by the Packet of Wednesday the Sixth of June. But as the Money Lenders, whether to make a mere Compliment to me, whether to shew their Patriotism, or whether from simple Caprice, made it an original Condition that my Name should be Subscribed to all the obligations, as it was in the first loan, instead of...
In my Acctt. sent Mr. Adams you will not find any large sums Credited for Your Farm. The Farm Acct. with Pratt I settled in April last, the whole Produce of Your half amounted (for the Year preceding) to £37. 5.11. This is accounted for in part in my last Acctt. part in this and the Remainder is discharged by Pratts Acct for Work, Rates and Sunds. debited Tho Pratt and J. Marsh. The Losses...
An unfortunate dislocation of my right wrist has for three months deprived me of the honor of writing to you. I begin now to use my pen a little, but it is in great pain, and I have no other use of my hand. The swelling has remained obstinately the same for two months past, and the joint, tho I beleive well set, does not become more flexible. I am strongly advised to go to some mineral waters...
This is the first Moment I have been able to Seize, in order to acquaint you of my Arrival and Situation. Governor Clinton The Mayor of New York, all the old officers of the Continental Government, and the Clergy, Magistrates and People, have Seemed to emulate the two houses of Congress, in shewing every respect to me and to my office.— For Particulars I must refer you to the public Papers....
I did not know till this moment that Coln. Franks would set out this evening, who has just Call’d on me for my Commands. I dare not detain him long, and cannot let him depart without a few lines to assure you of my attachment and best wishes. I am glad to find you are agreeably fixed and that you enjoy a good society which is certainly much superior to all the fashionable amusments of, this,...
An unfortunate dislocation of my right wrist has for three months deprived me of the honor of writing to you. I begin now to use my pen a little, but it is in great pain, and I have no other use of my hand. The swelling has remained obstinately the same for two months past, and the joint, tho I beleive well set, does not become more flexible. I am strongly advised to go to some mineral waters...
Mr Murray, whom I am glad to see out again will carry to Bath this Memorandum that We are all very well. He will arrive for what I know before Mr Bridgen. The Weath’s is very cold, but by a good fire and a good Walk I have not yet been obliged to recur to my Expedient of an immaculate Virgin Bottle of hot Water. I sent Yesterday—Packetts to Coll Smith from Paris. The News from Boston is very...
I expected to have received ere this some Letters either from Braintree or Boston; But excepting what I have collected from the Newspapers I have heard neither directly nor indirectly from either. Had any good opportunity for sending, presented itself I should have written, although the only topic of information, would have been concerning myself.— The sum total of my news is that since I...
I hope you have had a Pleasant Journey and are happy in your tour. I am, in a state of Phylosophic Solitude, that has hitherto been very tolerable, because I know my Treasures are not far off. But, as soon as the Novelty of it, wears off, and my occupation shall cease it will grow tedious enough. Dont hurry yourself however nor your Friends, but improve the opportunity to see, whatever you...
From the first of April to this time, I have been in constant and anxious Expectation of hearing of your Arrival in London. Your Letters encouraged me to hope and expect it, otherwise I should have been with you at Braintree before now. I still expect to hear of your arrival every moment, but as your last letters by Mr. Warren expressed a doubt, it is possible, even that this Letter may find...
We are now sailing up North River; and have met the french packet about 6 leagues from New York: she will sail to morrow morning; and has sent her boat on board, while we are at sail. I profit of the only minute instant I have to inform you, that after a tedious passage of 8 weeks, we expect by noon to be at New York. I have not even time to seal the Letter I have prepared for my Sister, and...
Your kind Letter of the 15th. December came to me last week, and should I pretend to describe the innate Plesure I felt on the perusal, words would be wanting in the description. I most ardently wish to see you, and hope it will not be many years before I shall have that pleasure. I realy wish that those customs you speak of were indeed adopted here. I have more reason to wish it than many...
I should deserve, all the reproaches which my friends in America have made me if I neglected writing, by so good an Opportunity as the one that presents itself at this time. Mr. Thaxter who will deliver you this expects to sail for New-York in the course of this Month. He will probably carry the Definitive Treaty, (which was at last signed yesterday,) to Congress. So you will not receive this...
I reciev’d a few days since your Letter of Sepr. 12th and yesterday that of october the 12th and thank you most sincerly for them both. Your account of Holland entertaind me much. You must have improv’d your time well to have visited so many places and notic’d so much. The fatigue was too great for you. It was this that made you sick. I was rejoic’d to find your dissorder whatever it was for...
I have been waiting till I am out of all patience to hear that you are returnd to England. One or two vessels have sail’d for London without taking Letters for you. I did not know they were going till it was too late to write. I sent you a hasty line by Mr. Charles Bulfinch which I hope you receiv’d and to tell you the truth I have written you two letters Since, which I thought proper to...
I have not seen your Letter to Sister Cranch as yet, and cannot tell how you like your present Situation—the People—their Language— nor their manners. But I suppose all “is sweet” now the dear chosen Partner is by. I think I will not allow Cousin Nabby to be a proper Judge. She will pardon me I hope. She views things through an unpleasing medium—she neither feels, nor wishes to be interested...
Mr Lincoln has been here for several Days past— Tomorrow he intends to return to Hingham, & has offered to carry a Letter to either of my Sisters— I would not let so good an Opportunity pass, since I have often experienced how good, & how pleasant it was to receive a few Lines from a dear Friend, informing me of particular Circumstances which are interesting to them, whether it be of Joy, or...
I have sent one Letter on Board capt Cushing but it is so long since that unless I Write again you will not feel as if you had heard from me for a long time— Cousin JQA & Billy have been at home above a week. Cousin charles was here yesterday. he came to wait upon mrs Hilliard & Daughter— your Sons are all well We are busy prepairing for commencment for although we do so little by way of...
Accept my dear Sister a thousand thanks for your charming Journal, it is just Such an one as I wish’d, so particular that while reading it, I could not help fancying my self with you. We hoped as we had Such fine weather for six weeks after you Sail’d, that you would have had a quicker Passage than I find you had. You did not feel more joy when you set your feet upon the British Coast, than I...
So I see by the papers that Amelia has become Mrs: Smith , and this the 12th. of June. The news came by the way of Philadelphia, and the first intelligence I had was from our News-Papers. By Callahan, who is expected here every day from London, I hope it will be announced to us officially. Joy to her and to you all! May it be attended with every blessing and pleasure the sanguine wish can...
This Day is the Aniversary of Eleven Years since our dear Mother left us poor Pilgrims, to sojourn here a little longer upon Earth, while she (as we trust) went to spend an eternal Sabbath in the blissful regions of immortality. The anual return of those Days, upon which some beloved Friend has been taken from me, I devote more particularly to the recollection of their amiable Qualities, and...
I have not wrote you my dear Aunt for a long time, much too long I confess; and even now those motives which have prevented, continue in force: A barreness of Subject is of all preventives the most dissagreable and I find it is like to prevail and increase in me daily; motives however more powerful have overcome this; and I am induced to write—tho—I triffle. Love, gratitude and esteem, I feel;...
There is another vessel up which will sail soon. What I may have omited by this I shall write by that. Our uncle Quincy was well a few hours since is glad to see his Friends but cannot be perswaided out. Cousin Cotton remains the same he was, Flying from spray to spray without determining Where to chuse his Partner. If his Father should marry as he will certainly do as soon as he can get time...
The Roads have been so bad for several Weeks past, that there has been but little travelling, and it has been difficult to get a conveyance. I did not know when Cousin Charles sent his Letter. I intended to have written and conveyed them together, and to have thanked you most heartily, most tenderly for your excellent Care of Mr. Shaw, and for your ingenuity in managing his Case so exactly...