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In my last Letter to M r. Adams I inform’d Him of the Death of our beloved Uncle Smith— had we enjoyed his Life much longer, it would have been greatly desireable—but Heaven was kind in continuing that rich Blessing for so long a Time we have the utmost Assurance that He is happy tho’ We have lost one Source of our temporal Felicity— His Virtues may we imitate and with him share in a better...
I have just Sent away one Letter and shall now begin another to be ready for the next ship. Cousin John is not yet arriv’d. I hear of him upon the road. He has not quite done his duty. He should have written to one of his uncles at least as soon as he came on Shore, but I will not chide him without hearing his reasons, I feel inclin’d to be very partial to him. I have just heard that cousin...
I have been waiting above a week hopeing to have a Letter from my dear sister informing me of her safe arrival at newyork Before I can write said I—I think I must have a Letter— you left us so unwell that I have been anxious about you ever since— I have a thousand times wish’d you back again your Letter to Mr Adams dated at Hartford has in some measure reliev’d me— I hope before this that you...
I have received duly the honor of your letter, and am now to return you thanks for your condescension in having taken the first step for settling a correspondence which I so much desired; for I now consider it as settled and proceed accordingly. I have always found it best to remove obstacles first. I will do so therefore in the present case by telling you that I consider your boasts of the...
By Mr. Bourne, who was here last Week, I informed You that our commercial Affairs were arranged, that Mr. Adams Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jefferson were to carry on the Negotiations, that three Years would probably be requisite to compleat the Business, and that you may embark for Europe, without Delay, as there is not a possibility of any Departure from the Measures adopted by Congress. Mr....
I have wrote your Daughter on the Head of common Intelligence. As to political I hardly know how to give a summary of that; as relates to this Commonwealth however I think that altho the Legislature of the last Year deliberated long they at last concluded like the Representatives of a wise People and have taxed smartly. This will operate in a few Years to reduce their public Debt greatly. The...
Cousin Charles and I have stay’d at home from meeting to day, he to write to his Papa and I because I was fatigue’d with runing about Boston Street for two days to pick up a number of things for our Sons. Mr JQA wanted a winter wastcoat and mr charles a Gown and a Pair of Breeches and little Tom a surtout. He had his Brother charless last winter and uses it, this to Answer the purpose of a...
Friend, after Friend is severed from my Heart—I have lost many near, & dear Relatives, as well as kind Benefactors, since you left America. I know you will be much affected by hearing of the Death of our worthy & much lamented Uncle Smith.— You my Sister knew how bright the humane & christian Virtues shone in his Life, & cannot wonder if the Land mourns when the godly Man ceaseth, & so...
The System of Government reported by the late Continental Convention has afforded much Matter for Pens and Tongues— The Friends & opposers of it are distinguished by the Party names of Federalists & Antifederalists— These Names I suspect will continue as long as Whig & Tory— which of the Parties will carry their Point, is difficult to say— Many of the Advocates for the Constitution are...
Col. Jacob Davis not long since called upon me for the Payment of one of the Lots of Land in Vermont State which you recd. a Deed of and was not paid for, by his Brother Ebenr Davis whom he empowered for that Purpose. I accordingly paid it, he requested Interest from the Time the Deed was given, I did not conceive myself authorized to allow it as You did not give me any directions relative to...
Yours of July 19 th which either did, or was to have come in Callihan last Fall, I did not receive ’till the 6 th of March —where it had lain, or where Peabody got it from I cannot tell—but this I know, I am glad I have it, for it is a valuable acquisition to me, as rich, & precious Treasure, as all my dear Sisters Letters are— Your eldest Son made us a Visit of a few Days in March— He says he...
I wonder whether Mr. Shaw ever wrote you an account of the good woman who was so much offendid that you were not treated with more civillity when you went to see the King and Queen. “Why I hear they did not so much as ask them to set down, but keept them standing four hours without offering them any thing to eat or drink. I thought such great Folks knew what good manners was, better than to...
Notwithstanding the unconquerable aversion I ever had to writing I cannot forbear taking up my Pen, to Congratulate my dear Neice on the new year, and to thank her for her favour by the Welcome hand of my Nephew, who is return’d I hope uncorupted, I do not wonder you wisht to keep him with you, I think he is very agreable. Your Journal and Letters to your friends have ever afforded me great...
Your esteemed Favor of July 22d did not come to hand untill Capt Callahan had arrived 12 Days, for which and its Contents accept our Thanks. I shall see Dr Tufts and attend to the Directions of the Note. I am sorry to reflect that the Conclusions drawn in my last to you were so erroneous they were founded upon an opinion of Virtue which I am now convinced is in suficiently possessed by the...
It is a long time since I wrote you last, but I am perfectly weary of making apologies. I have no doubt but my friends will forgive me, when they recollect the causes which have prevented me from informing them frequently of those trivial events, which the partiality of friendship alone can render interesting. When I was last in Boston, which was about two months ago, I wrote a few hasty lines...
You will percieve by the date of this that I am at H——: last thursday I arrived here. My Visit is to Miss White. She has spent the Summer in Boston, and has been attempting to learn Musick, like myself. She has brought her instrument to H—— and sent me an invitation to come and pass a few months with her, and learn of her Master, who is a Man acquaintd with Musick, but not with much beside. He...
If you have reciev’d our Letters by Capn Callahan you will be in Some measure prepair’d for the accounts which Capn Folger will bring you of the Rebellion which exists in this state. It had arisen to such a height that it was necessary to oppose it by force of arms. We are always in this country to do things in an extraordinary many manner . The militia were call’d for, but there was not a...
Long e’er this time I hope my dear Sister and Cousin have sat their Feet upon the British shore, and been made happy by the sight of their long absent Friends. Your mind must have been greatly agitated as you drew near the place where you expected to meet them, uncertain as you were whether the first inteligence would produce you the most exquisite pleasure, or the most Poignant distress. I...
Not one line from my dear Sister have I reciev’d sinc last September. What can be the reason? I hope the letters we have written to you are all come safe to your Hands and that you have had no great expence in geting them. We have done all we could to prevent it. John Cranch tells us of a large Pacquit coming from the Hague by the English Ambassador which Mr. Elworthy sent to you. I hope one...
It is mortifying to me, to be again obliged to offer an excuse, for not having written more frequently to you, and to my father however conscious I may be, of its having been out of my Power, yet the Idea, of your suspecting me of neglecting you, worries me very much. But it has been and still is absolutely necessary for me, to apply myself with unremitting attention to my studies. About ten...
I wrote you a few hasty lines, from Boston the Monday before Commencement, inclosing two news-papers which Mr Jinks was to carry, I went to Cambridge that afternoon: I heard in the evening that Calahan had arrived. I never hear of a ships arrival from London, but what I feel a mixture of pain with the pleasure, ’till we have got the Letters— I always tremble when they are opened. I never felt...
Come home my Sister, that Braintree may have some of its old inhabitants residing in it. Could you look in upon it, you would sigh over some of its desirted mansions. General Palmers Family mov’d last week to charlestown. They came here in a violent Snow-Storm; they had sent away all their Provision and had nothing to eat. The next day they Set off in much better Spirits than I expected. The...
I have just heard that Scot is to sail tomorrow. I cannot let a vessel go without a few Lines when I know of it. I have a letter began at home for you, but I cannot get it Soon enough to go by this conveyence. The children have Letters for you and their Cousin but they must all wait for the next vessel. I have had so much company lately that it has been impossible to write as we would have...
I have received duly the honor of your letter, and am now to return you thanks for your condescension in having taken the first step for settling a correspondence which I so much desired; for I now consider it as settled and proceed accordingly. I have always found it best to remove obstacles first. I will do so therefore in the present case by telling you that I consider your boasts of the...
I am equally pleased with your Letter of the Ninth of May and the very Delicate Friendly Motives which Induced you to Write it. Whilst I Continue to regard your Amiable Daughter, the Esteem of her Parents, independent of their Merit, will be ever dear to me: and whilst the human Mind is ever most Anxious for what it holds most Dear, I shall have my “Apprehensions” and feel gratefull toward...
Agreably to the intimation in the note I had the pleasure to address you from the Inn —we reached Harwich the next morning by eight, where Cap t Flynn soon recognized his Excellency and congratulated himself on the prospect of once more conveying him to Holland. Yet he did not forget politely to regret that M rs Adams was now absent and cou’d not therefore join in “his triumph nor partake the...
M r. Du err , as you pronounce it, and my Wife seem to think alike as to the Powers of an Ambassadress when placed as an Helpmate to the Ambassador. M r D. had an Idea of an handsome Face M rs. L thought only of the Good Sense of the Lady. If this is ambiguous , y r. best Friend can make it plain so far as relates to Du err . As to M rs. L I will show her to you in a Minute, just as She...
Your Letter March 24th. by Capt Cushing, with the Apron, came safe to Hand 2 Days after his Arrival at Boston. Lyde, and Cushing got in the same Day. Mrs Hays Baggage could not be broke till she came from Newyork, so that I did not get that Token, and Expression of your Love, and kindness, till a fortnight after. I cannot think what is become of a Letter I sent you last November, giving you an...
An anxiety to preserve a consistancy of Character in the opinion of Mrs. Adams (in whose favourable sentiments I feel myself more and more interested) induces me to say, that I have some reason to believe, that the late Connection, which appeared an insurmountable Obstacle to the accomplishment of the Wish nearest my heart—exists no longer. And from the opinion I have of the Lady, I am...
The last Week has indeed been a Week of Joy to me— We have “eat our Bread with gladness, & drank our Wine with merry Hearts—” My dear Nephews have done themselves, & their Friends honour by their publick Performances— And Mr Shaw, & myself shared in a very particular manner, the general satisfaction, & Festivity of the Day— William Cranch had a Dissertation shewing the Utillity, & necessity of...
I have been honoured with your two letters of Octob. 19. and 25. by Mr. Fox and Doctor Rodgers since the date of my last. I am to thank you for your state of Stanhope’s case. It has enabled me to speak of that transaction with a confidence of which I should otherwise have been deprived by the different state of it in the public papers and the want of information from America. I have even...
How good you are my dear Aunt, to favour me so often with your charming Letters, you cannot think how proud I am of them. I read them very often. I hope I shall even be the better for the instructions contained in them, and catch some of that warm regard for honour and virtue which shows itself in every sentence. What an idea do you give us of high life in Europe. Is it possible that beings...
I have omitted writing sooner to you in expectation that Colõ Smith would have taken this in his route: but receiving now information from him that he embarks from Lisbon, I avail myself of the opportunity by mr̃ Payne of thanking you for the disbursements you were so kind as to make for my daughter in London, and of stating to you our accounts as follows. £ s d Disbursements of mrs Adams as...
I have omitted writing sooner to you in expectation that Colo. Smith would have taken this in his route: but receiving now information from him that he embarks from Lisbon, I avail myself of the opportunity by Mr. Payne of thanking you for the disbursements you were so kind as to make for my daughter in London, and of stating to you our accounts as follows. £  s  d Disbursements of Mrs. Adams...
I received Yours, last Friday just as We were siting down to dinner, favoured by Mr. Ludden. We mortified our bodily appetite for a few moments, for the sake of gratifying our mental—and I assure you we found it an agreeable Repast, notwithstanding it informed us of your Reheumatism for which we are sorry, Tommy and I more espicially. I confess it was not written in the spirit, and humour of a...
What in the name of wonder can you be doing on your side the Atlantic? We hear no more of you than if you were in the regions above the Moon. It is not to be long so I hope, for we are become very impatient now for news. Here, we seem to be almost at a stand, as it were; waiting for good tidings from afar. I fancy the case is much the same with you. With this I send you some newspapers, which...
My heart has dictated many Letters to you since the recept of yours, but my time has been so wholy taken up in my famely, (haveing no Schoole to send my little tribe to) that not a moment could be spared even for so necessary and incumbant a Duty. Your kind letter was handed me by your Son, who I had long been most ardently wishing to see. He is indeed ten times welcome to this Section of the...
I reciv’d your September Letters a little while after I sent off my November ones, and a Feast they were to me. Mr. Storer inform’d us of your leaving England, any thing further was all conjecture. We have not had one chance of Sending to you this winter except by the way of Amsterdam last week: but as I thought you would get a Letter sooner from England, and Capn. Lyde was to sail soon, I...
I wrote to you about three weeks since thinking clallahan would sail immediatly but he is not yet gone & I find Folger will go before him—but my Letters will be old unless I add a short one now— I was not a little dissapointed by not receiving a Line by the Last vessel which arriv’d Doctor Tufts receiv’d one from you & he got it before those you sent by the way of new york He will tell you...
I had the pleasure of writing to Mr. Adams four or five days after your departure to acquaint you of your son’s safe arrival at l’Orient, and as I did not know your proper adress, I enclosed my letter to Mr. Clarke at Counsellor Brown’s, Chancery Lane, with very particular charge to wait on you immediately on your arrival. Mr. Clarke has not wrote to me since, and by Miss Adams’s note I am led...
I recd. yours of Jan. 10. Feby 21 and April the 8th And am obliged to you for your affectionate Letter of Condolance and also for the Intelligence conveyed in the several Letters. The State of our Country is uncomfortable, if not hazardous. The Scarcity (real I rather think than artificial) of Gold and Silver prompts People to seek a Remedy in Paper Money, already has Rhode Island issued...
I thank my dear M rs Adams for M rs Montagues observation, on the writings of shakespear which I received by Calihan. though every part of your letters always Give me pleasure I found a Certain Satisfaction peculiar in that paragraph in your last which Gives an intimation that you mean to return to America in The Spring. uncertain as all human events are I cannot but look forward & in a degree...
Your benevolence I know will excuse the particularity of this address, when you confide in the assurance of its proceeding from a sincere heart nourishing the most exalted sentiments of the virtue and sensibility of yours. Accept of my thanks for the reply to my note, I feel myself complimented by your confidence and beleive I am not capable of abusing it. I hope for an advocate in you, should...
Yes my dear Sister I have thought it very long since I have receiv’d a Letter from you and thought it very Strange that you should not write me one line by the January Pacquit when mr cranch receiv’d one from mr Adams. You say you wrote but one Letter by it, but do not tell me who it was too none of your Friends here have receiv’d any, and mr King directed a number of other pioples to mr...
Although I have written so largly to you by the last vessels that Saild I cannot bear to let another go without a few Lines. I have not yet receiv’d your Letters by Charles Storer. He is not come to Boston. I am anxious to receive them. I want to know what it is, whether any thing in particular has happen’d to make my Neice take such a determin’d part with regard to a certain Gentleman. He is...
I beg you to inform M rs. Smith, that I have forwarded to M r M c. Connell enclosed in a Letter to Miss Margaret Smith the Picture she requested me to send and have rece d Information f m. D r. Crosby of M r. M c. Connell’s having rec d. my Letter— By M
I have within this Hour receiv’d your Letters by captain Bigelow and have also heard that cushing is not sail’d. He has one Letter on board for you already but tis not so long a one as I have generally sent you. The Subject was So melancholy that I could not mix any thing with it. I expected every hour that Cushing would sail and had not time to write more. I began to write you last night but...
Your Son JQA is become a son of Harvard. He was admited last wednesday, and we are now prepairing him for House-keeping. He has a chamber with one of the Masters till commencment, then He and his Brother charles will live together if they can. The young Gentleman finds the Bed and Linnen. I have taken the Furniture for the Chamber from your House a few things were to be purchased at Boston....