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Yesterday afternoon Mr. V——handed me your letter. I am sorry that you were prevented from communicating your farther sentiments, as I wished to know them fully. I presume you do not propose the question, “whether I would consent to your leaving this country without me,” with an intention of being influenced by my reply, if you did, I confess I should not know what to determine. I had rather go...
I wrote you a hasty letter from New-York, just to acknowledge the receipt of yours, No. 5, the week before last; since which I have not heard from you, nor have I had an opportunity to write. * * * * * * * Pennsylvania has already appointed her Senators, who are Mr. Morris and a Mr. McLain. Poor —— is, then, disappointed; for he went home to make interest for himself, as it was said. There are...
I rose this morning with a fair prospect of landing before night, but alas, we are immersed in fogs and darkness. We have been within a few hours sail of New-York, for several days; but fogs, calms, and contrary winds, have deprived us of the happiness of seeing our native land; it is a most mortifying situation. I hope you have not known from experience to what a degree it is teasing; but...
I received, on Wednesday last, from the hands of Mr. T——, your letter, No. 4, of August 25th. He was so obliging as to call with it himself, in company with Mr. King. * * * Mr. George Storer came out last evening to pass Sunday with us, and by him I propose to forward my letter. He is very civil in forwarding letters for me, and is disposed to be sociable; I am glad that he is pleased with his...
It is now the 7th. of July, the 18th. day Since we Saw You Quit our shores to seek a happier Climate. We perceived the Active passing as we went up to Publick worship, there we did not forget to ask favour for our friends (who had commited themselves to the Variable Elements) of him who alone Governeth. Our fondest wishes have been granted as far was we can yet know; a happier season for the...
We are anxiously expecting, by the arrival of every post, to hear of your safety and health. I begin to be very impatient to hear of an event in which I am so much interested. I fear that you have been detained in England longer than you expected, perhaps, by the receipt of the letters Col. Smith forwarded from Bath to my father. Mr. Jay was very much surprised that the gentlemen to whom he...
[ Paris, 7 Jan. 1787. Recorded in SJL under this date. Not found; but see Mrs. Adams’ reply, 29 Jan. 1787.]
We came to town last evening to dine (by invitation) this day, with the President of Congress, and this morning I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 6th. * * * * I am very sorry to hear that you have had so much sickness and so many other perplexities to encounter, since your return; it increases my desire to be with you, to assist you all in my power. I hope you will escape...
After a Passage of two days, against contrary Winds, and a terrible Jolt through the Mud, from Helvoet, I arrived here this day, in good health and not bad Spirits. The Princes Birth day is on Saturday: so that I shall not be able to take Leave before Monday, and if I go to Amsterdam afterwards, I shall not be able to leave that City before Wednesday or Thursday: so that I fear you cannot...
We have received from Congress a Resolution by which We are to be impowered to negotiate a Treaty of Commerce with G. B. My self Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay. This will detain me in Europe this Winter. If this Letter arrives in Season, that you can come to me this Fall with Miss Nabby, I shall be Supreamly happy to see you. But Still Things are so unsettled in Congress that you may expect to...
I have past through the Ceremonies of taking Leave of the States General, the Prince and Princess &c to the Satisfaction of all Parties—and have been feasted at Court, and all that.— made my Compliments to the Prince on the 8. of March his Birth Day, and to the Princess at her Drawing Room &c &c &c. and should have been in London at this hour if you had not have laid a Plott, which has brought...
I heartily rejoice to hear of Your safe arrival; pray make My best respects acceptable to Mr. Adams, Miss Nabby, and Your Son. I can write but little, being very weak, confined by lameness, about 8 Weeks, but am growing better; this day, I was carried out and put into a Chaise (the first time of being out) and rid out on the Farm; but I hope to go to Connecticut, next Month. They at Mr....
Most Sincerely do I congrattulate you, Madam, and your amiable Daughter upon your Safe arrival at the wished for Port: my busy imagination persued you through the whole of your voyage untill it Saw you Safely and joyfully Landed upon the British Shores. I doubt not but long before this, you have been made happy, in meeting with Mr. Adams your long absent Friend. May Heaven reward him for the...
Your Letter of the 23d. has made me the happiest Man upon Earth. I am twenty Years younger than I was Yesterday. It is a cruel Mortification to me that I cannot go to meet you in London, but there are a Variety of Reasons decisive against it, which I will communicate to you here. Meantime, I Send you a son who is the greatest Traveller, of his Age, and without Partiality, I think as promising...
The three Letters which Mrs. Adams honoured me with were received at Paris, and should have been answered, had an oppertunity offered. Permit me to pass an encomium on that prudence which dictates silence on painful Subjects, and to assure her while honour guides my actions and is my ruling star thro’ Life—I shall alway’s endeavour to appear as if I had taken the deepest draught from the...
This being the day on which, according to my calculation, my daughter would be crossing the channel, I had calculated the course from Dover to Calais and was watching the wind when your favour of the 6 th. was put into my hands. that of June 27. had been received four days ago. I perceived that that had happened which I had apprehended, that your goodness had so attached her to you that her...
Indeed my ever honoured Aunt I should have been much disapointed if my Cousin had not brought me a letter from you. Your pen Madam is never so far exhausted that every sentence that falls from it does not yeild pleasure or instruction. In your letters indeed those qualities are so happily blended that we cannot take from the one without distroying the other. I hope before this you have heard...
I am never happier than when I am performing good offices for good people; and the most friendly office one can perform is to make worthy characters acquainted with one another. The good things of this life are scattered so sparingly in our way that we must glean them up as we go. Yourself and Madame de Corny then must avail yourselves of the short time she will remain in London to make each...
It is an ill wind blows no body any good owing to that I received your favor with the greatest sense of gratitude & love for the distinguishd regard you have always showed me which is returned & cherished with increasing interest I was sensible how much you avoided an explanation as to your departure & I was equally unwilling to enquire. I shall always rejoice to hear from you & esteem it...
Being without any of your Favors unanswered I take the Liberty to write this in Advance. The State of some Counties having been tumultuous to this Time notwithstanding the lenient Measures of Government has induced the supreme Executive to order a Military Force into the County of Worcester under Genl Lincoln; I should blush for my Country was I not sensible that it is not uncommon under more...
I do indeed rejoice with you all upon the happy event which took place in mr smiths Family before your arrival I hope my Neices health is perfectly restor’d that the young gentlemen are both very well—& that you may soon return accompany’d by Coll n. smith whom I wish much to see— you must not think of comeing in the stage. It would be highly improper upon every account— we receiv’d your...
I was most sensibly pleased, with the Sight of the Dutch Liberty medal which you was so obliging as to send me. I know not how to deprive you of it but in compliance with your commands and from the manner in which you express yourself. Assuredly it shall have an interesting, place in my cabinet sacred to Freedom amidst the american medals. If you and Mr Adams will come down to the Hide, you...
Since I had the Pleasure of addressing You, nothing of Importance has occurred in the Concerns of our Friend excepting a Letter from Mr. Jay, wherein he with great Candour and good Sense has endeavoured to do Justice to Mr. Adams’ Character, and recommended him as the most suitable person to represent the united States at the Court of London; declaring at the same Time in the most positive...
you put too much value on trifles which are only small marks of real regard & affection to you & yours. I have always conceived it to be more difficult to give than receive. as the sense of obligation sets heavy on minds inflated with riches or pride & not capable of enlarged ideas or of the pleasing sensations which arise from mutual gifts & good offices abstracted from their intrinsick...
I was honoured with your letter of Aug. 21. by Mr. Smith who arrived here on the 29th. I am sorry you did not repeat the commission you had favoured me with by Mr. Short as the present would have been an excellent opportunity of sending the articles you wished for. As Mr. Short’s return may yet be delayed, will you be so good as to write me by post what articles you desired, lest I should not...
I am this day honoured with your favor of the 20th. and an opportunity offering to acknolege it immediately, I do not fail to embrace it. I thank you for the intelligence it contains. You refered me to Mr. Adams for news; but he gives me none; so that I hope you will be so good as to keep that office in your own hands. I get little from any other quarter since the derangement of the French...
Your favor of the 7th. was put into my hands the last night and as I received at the same time dispatches from Mr. Adams which occasion a great deal to be done for Congress to be sent by the Mr. Fitzhughs who set out tomorrow morning for Philadelphia as Mr. Preston the bearer of this does for London, I have only time to thank you for your kind attention to my commission and your offer of new...
I have time only to inform you that We are well, and to repeat my earnest Wish and Expectation to see you as soon as possible. Draw upon me for Whatever Money You want and it shall be paid at Sight. I have been invited by the Duke of Portland and Mr. Fox to See them and I have Seen them and Mr. Burke an d met a cordial Reception from all three. These would do right if they governed. But I am...
Thanks be to an ever watchful & kind Providence that has conducted my dear Brother, & Sister safely to their native Shore— With all the tender affections that ever warmed a Sisters Heart, I bid you welcome—welcome once more to America—welcome my dear Brother to a Land for which you have for many years toil’d & laboured— I have my dear Sister been exceedingly axious for these three weeks about...
I have been so diligent on the Road and so much interrupted by Company at the Taverns that this is the first time I have been able to get an opportunity to write to you. We arrived at this house last night (Saturday) Shall rest here to day and go into N. York tomorrow.— at Hartford, the Manufacturers presented me with a Piece of Broadcloth, for a Suit of Cloaths. at N. Haven the Corporation...
I am never happier than when I am performing good offices for good people; and the most friendly office one can perform is to make worthy characters acquainted with one another. The good things of this life are scattered so sparingly in our way that we must glean them up as we go. Yourself and Madame de Corny then must avail yourselves of the short time she will remain in London to make each...
I have this moment received your polite Invitation to dinner tomorrow, and am extremely sorry, that a severe Cold, which has confined me a day or two to the House, prevents my accepting it. I had engaged to dine in Company tomorrow if well enough, but could easily set aside the Engagement, if nothing else but that prevented. I should be very happy to see Mr. Shaw, and if I have not that...
We are lodged in our old Chamber at Amsterdam, and Sleep as soundly as if there were not a dozen houses plundered every night. The two nights before the last were very Seditious. last night was quiet, and the Precautions which Secured the Peace then, will be continued, so t[hat] all will be still.— dont be anxious for Us, nor believe half the Reports that will be circulated. Such Events are...
This moment returning from Mr Bridgen where I had been to deliver him a Letter to you, written this Morning I found your very agreable favour of the 23. Am very glad you are so well Situated, So much pleased with your Journey, and present Accommodation. Dont be solicitous about me. I shall do very well—if I am cold in the night, and an additional quantity of Bed Cloaths will not answer the...
Having humbly presumed to wait on you to solicit the honor of serving your Excellency’s Family with Cream and Milk, and had the honor to give you at the Hotel last Fryday, a Recommendation from his Excellency the Spanish Ambassador’s Steward, you was pleased to order me to wait at your House in Grosvenor Square Yesterday Morning with Cream and Milk, which I accordingly did; but may it please...
I should have addressed your excellency sooner, but that my mind, which is the weakest —(or, as I had rather settle your excellency’s idea of it, the most delicate )—thing in the world, has been for sometime suspended between the contrary fears—of trespassing upon your more important attentions, on the one hand, or against the obligations of gratitude & decorum, on the other: The last has,...
As I have been in Daily expectations of seeing London, I have defered answering your Letter, meaning to pay my respects in person. But seeing by the Papers Mr: Adams is just on the eve of his departure for Spain I have taken up my pen to request the favour of you to inform me whether you have heard from Mr: or Mrs: Warren since you wrote last, I still remain in the same situation I was then...
one line by my son inquires after the health of my Friend, at Braintree. do you begin to feel at home. & will you not after becoming a little Domesticateed in your native town think of an excursion to plimouth where you will find the same Friend, the same hospitality & undissembleed affection which in my opinion Gives the truest Zest to human life. you have seen all the Varietiy. & perhaps...
This being the day on which, according to my calculation, my daughter would be crossing the channel, I had calculated the course from Dover to Calais and was watching the wind when your favour of the 6th. was put into my hands. That of June 27. had been received four days ago. I perceived that that had happened which I had apprehended, that your goodness had so attached her to you that her...
I am, My dear Madam led by Various Motives to take My pen to Scribble a few lines at least by this conveyance. The first is that you May be Sensible of My readyness to Acknowledge the favur you have been pleased to shew Me in Answering My Short letter in such a descriptive Manner as to make it quite Needless for Me (to wish) to cross the line to become acquainted with the Mind the form the...
Tho’ it is probable you will hear of it from some other of your friends, yet as I know the interest my dear Mother had in your affections, and that you will not fail of sympathizing with us, I Could not avoid the opportunity by Mr Gardner of acquainting you with the loss of her, and am sorry that the first occasion I should have of writing you since your residence in England should be of such...
Not to acknowledge the many favours I have recieved from you, and the obligations they have laid me under, would be ingratitude in the greatest Degree. The only method now in my power of Cancelling those obligations is to acknowledge them & perhaps prevent your being dissappointed, should Callahan arrive before Folgier. For upon the supposition that Folgier would sail first, all the Letters...
I had the honour of writing you on the 21st. of June, but the letter being full of treason has waited a private conveiance. Since that date there has been received for you at Auteuil a cask of about 60. gallons of wine. I would have examined it’s quality and have ventured to decide on it’s disposal, but it is in a cask within a cask, and therefore cannot be got at but by operations which would...
When I wrote to You by Capt. Cushing informed You of my Fears with respect to Mrs. Tufts’s Illness. The Event which I then feared, has since taken Place. Heaven has executed its Will. The Partner of my Life is gone to Rest, She expired a bout 7 oClock on the 30th. of Octob. in the Evening, after a long and painful Sickness. Amidst the various Tryalls of Life, it is sometimes a Consolation that...
Suppose every proper Epithet to occupy these two upper Lines. Under them all I most cordially salute you. Once upon the Arrival of a Ship from France “you was too happy to find Time for answering Letters.” I do not now want any Answer. All I wish is that you may steal from yourself and one other a Minute for reading this short Scrawl. Your Benevolence and your Curiosity secure my Wish; and,...
The silk you desired was delivered to Mr. Parker a month ago, on the eve of his departure for England, as he supposed. He went however to Holland. Mr. Valnay is so kind as to take charge of that now, as also of the silk stockings. I doubt whether you may like the stockings on first appearance. But I will answer for their goodness, being woven expressly for me by the Hermits of Mont Calvaire...
M r: Lincoln, the bearer, is a young preacher, who belongs to Hingham; he is going home, and I cannot suffer the opportunity to pass unimproved; though I have little to say: except that I have been unwell: my nerves have been disordered, and the words of Henry have [. . .] obtruded themselves upon my mind, at the midnight hour. I came here last Saturday, and have such excellent care taken of...
It is with particular pleasure I communicate to you the joyfull news of M rs: Smiths safe delivery of a Son, which took place between seven & eight the last Evening, she was not the least indisposed untill six o’Clock & by ½ past seven all was well & tranquil, both continue composed and easy, but Nabby desires me to tell you that she is much disappointed, she had made the things, to adorn a...
A thousand thanks to you, my dear Madam, for your kind attention to my little daughter. her distresses I am sure must have been troublesome to you: but I know your goodness will forgive her, & forgive me too for having brought them on you. Petit now comes for her. by this time she will have learned again to love the hand that feeds & comforts her, and have formed an attachment to you. she will...
I have rec d yours of the 7. th — I have written you on every Post day. M r Jefferson is so anxious to obtain Money here to enable him to discharge some of the Most urgent demands upon the United States and preserve their Credit from Bankruptcy for two Years longer after which he thinks the new Gov’t will have Money in their Treasury from Taxes; that he has prevailed upon me to open a new...