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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 61-90 of 248 sorted by editorial placement
I did not know till this moment that Coln. Franks would set out this evening, who has just Call’d on me for my Commands. I dare not detain him long, and cannot let him depart without a few lines to assure you of my attachment and best wishes. I am glad to find you are agreeably fixed and that you enjoy a good society which is certainly much superior to all the fashionable amusments of, this,...
My Papa came in this evening and brought a great Letter directed to Mama, superscrib’d by my Uncle Adams. Mama is at Braintree, we had no Letters to satisfy us. The Pacquet was laid upon the table. I took it up, examined the seal, and wanted much to get at the contents, then took the stocking, (which I was lining the Heel of for your Charles), and work’d upon it a little, all the time...
Your benevolence I know will excuse the particularity of this address, when you confide in the assurance of its proceeding from a sincere heart nourishing the most exalted sentiments of the virtue and sensibility of yours. Accept of my thanks for the reply to my note, I feel myself complimented by your confidence and beleive I am not capable of abusing it. I hope for an advocate in you, should...
The long looked for, the modest, the manly, the well accomplished Youth, is come at last. And had he needed any thing to have made him doubly welcome to our House, but his own agreeable Behaviour, the evident Credentials he bears in his Eyes, about his Mouth, and in the Shape of his Face of being the Son of my excellent, and much loved Brother and Sister, would alone have gained him a most...
Indeed my ever honoured Aunt I should have been much disapointed if my Cousin had not brought me a letter from you. Your pen Madam is never so far exhausted that every sentence that falls from it does not yeild pleasure or instruction. In your letters indeed those qualities are so happily blended that we cannot take from the one without distroying the other. I hope before this you have heard...
Mr. Short’s return the night before last availed me of your favour of Aug. 12. I immediately ordered the shoes you desired which will be ready tomorrow. I am not certain whether this will be in time for the departure of Mr. Barclay or of Colo. Franks, for it is not yet decided which of them goes to London. I have also procured for you three plateaux de dessert with a silvered ballustrade round...
I am afraid my dear Mamma, will accuse me again of neglect for not having written to her, since I left her, before now; several Circumstances have concurred to prevent me; and among the rest, the want of an opportunity to convey any Letters; the stagnation of commerce, has of late been so great; that no vessel since my arrival, at Boston has sailed from thence to any port in Great Britain, and...
I am equally pleased with your Letter of the Ninth of May and the very Delicate Friendly Motives which Induced you to Write it. Whilst I Continue to regard your Amiable Daughter, the Esteem of her Parents, independent of their Merit, will be ever dear to me: and whilst the human Mind is ever most Anxious for what it holds most Dear, I shall have my “Apprehensions” and feel gratefull toward...
You will percieve by the date of this that I am at H——: last thursday I arrived here. My Visit is to Miss White. She has spent the Summer in Boston, and has been attempting to learn Musick, like myself. She has brought her instrument to H—— and sent me an invitation to come and pass a few months with her, and learn of her Master, who is a Man acquaintd with Musick, but not with much beside. He...
Your favor of the 7th. was put into my hands the last night and as I received at the same time dispatches from Mr. Adams which occasion a great deal to be done for Congress to be sent by the Mr. Fitzhughs who set out tomorrow morning for Philadelphia as Mr. Preston the bearer of this does for London, I have only time to thank you for your kind attention to my commission and your offer of new...
The anxious Sentiments of a Parent which You have manifested in the close of Your last Letter, I have read with a sympathetic Feeling. It would give me singular Pleasure to have it in my Power to give you such Information as would entirely set your Mind at Ease. I had hopes that Time would have produced such Evidence, as would have removed Doubt. I scarcely know what to say. If the Character...
Your agreable Letter of May. 10. from Auteuil I received by your Son. His Absence You will feel and I do not wonder that you parted with him with Regret as his Ability to relieve his Parents from many Cares and Burdens must have been great. He is now pursuing his Studies with his Uncle Shaw, more especially in the Latin and Greek Languages. In other Respects he was qualified to have entered in...
I hope my dear Sister you have receiv’d the Letter You was looking for in Callahan. I think I did not send it till the next Ship Saild. I have put a very long letter aboard this Ship a month since, supposing she would sail in a few days. Last night I receiv’d your Letter of the i6th of august and am not a little surpriz’d at the contents. My dear Niece has acted with a Spirit worthy of her...
My heart has dictated many Letters to you since the recept of yours, but my time has been so wholy taken up in my famely, (haveing no Schoole to send my little tribe to) that not a moment could be spared even for so necessary and incumbant a Duty. Your kind letter was handed me by your Son, who I had long been most ardently wishing to see. He is indeed ten times welcome to this Section of the...
Your Son, My Dear Sister has been a Member of our Family for these five Weeks, almost three of those I suppose he will tell You, Mr. Shaw and I were absent upon our southern Journey. He came a Friday in Peabody’s Coach, and we began our Rout the next Monday. His Uncle spent Saturday in giving him Directions about his Studies, and what he could wish him to pursue till his Return. Greek seemed...
Although I have written so largly to you by the last vessels that Saild I cannot bear to let another go without a few Lines. I have not yet receiv’d your Letters by Charles Storer. He is not come to Boston. I am anxious to receive them. I want to know what it is, whether any thing in particular has happen’d to make my Neice take such a determin’d part with regard to a certain Gentleman. He is...
When I wrote to You by Capt. Cushing informed You of my Fears with respect to Mrs. Tufts’s Illness. The Event which I then feared, has since taken Place. Heaven has executed its Will. The Partner of my Life is gone to Rest, She expired a bout 7 oClock on the 30th. of Octob. in the Evening, after a long and painful Sickness. Amidst the various Tryalls of Life, it is sometimes a Consolation that...
I have been honoured with your two letters of Octob. 19. and 25. by Mr. Fox and Doctor Rodgers since the date of my last. I am to thank you for your state of Stanhope’s case. It has enabled me to speak of that transaction with a confidence of which I should other­ wise have been deprived by the different state of it in the public papers and the want of information from America. I have even...
How provoking it is to be told that a vessel is to sail next week with our Letters and then have it stay in the Harbour six Weeks. I thought till yesterday that Capn. Young was half way to London at least, and behold he will not leave Boston this week. The Letters will be so old, that they will lose much of their value, but tis no fault of mine. I have been waiting some time without writing...
The three Letters which Mrs. Adams honoured me with were received at Paris, and should have been answered, had an oppertunity offered. Permit me to pass an encomium on that prudence which dictates silence on painful Subjects, and to assure her while honour guides my actions and is my ruling star thro’ Life—I shall alway’s endeavour to appear as if I had taken the deepest draught from the...
I last week recieved your invaluable favour of August 27. by Mr. Storer. I wish it was in my power to return you any thing that would be any way equivelent to it, if there are any of your Letters Madam, (which I am very sure there is not) that will bear to be ranked with Whiped Sulububs Flumery &c. in what rank must mine be placed. Far very far below them. Believe me Madam your Letter to me...
Mr. Storer is arriv’d and I have got my Letter and am very sorry to hear you have been so sick. If I had receiv’d this Letter before those by Callahan I should have been very uneasey till I could have heard again. I Will hope you are by this time perfectly recover’d. You will see by mine of November 29th that our thoughts in September and October were imploy’d about the same melancholy...
Expecting Baron Polnitz to call every moment, I have only time to acknolege the receipt of your favor of Nov. 24. and to answer you on the subject of the bill for 319 livres drawn by Mr. Adams in favor of Mr. Bonfeild. I had never heard of it before, and Mr. Barclay calling on me this morning I asked of him if he knew any thing of it. He says that such a bill was presented to him, and he...
This is the fourth attempt my Dear Madam that I have made to reply to your unmerited favour of the 30th. of April last, long since reciev’d, but ill health and dejection of Spirit have hinder’d me from writing, for what cou’d I write that cou’d give you half the entertainment, that excellent Letter gave us? Nothing certainly; I will not therefore attempt it. Your recollection of the Scenes of...
I did not design to write another line till I could get my pen mendid but not a creature can I get to do it, and I am so affraid that Captain Lyde will sail without my Pacquit that I dare not venture to wait till the children come from college tomorrow. I hope to see the dear Boys, and if the ship should not go so soon as I expect I will write again. I shall certainly write by the way of New...
I am persuaded you will be pleased with this letter, if you were not ever before with one from me, because in the first place, it will inform you of my safe arrival among my friends, and at the same time may give you some information respecting yours. I write you therefore with pleasure on my part. Our arrival here be assured was attended with much satisfaction on all sides. I need not paint...
I wonder whether Mr. Shaw ever wrote you an account of the good woman who was so much offendid that you were not treated with more civillity when you went to see the King and Queen. “Why I hear they did not so much as ask them to set down, but keept them standing four hours without offering them any thing to eat or drink. I thought such great Folks knew what good manners was, better than to...
I am this day honoured with your favor of the 20th. and an opportunity offering to acknolege it immediately, I do not fail to embrace it. I thank you for the intelligence it contains. You refered me to Mr. Adams for news; but he gives me none; so that I hope you will be so good as to keep that office in your own hands. I get little from any other quarter since the derangement of the French...
It is mortifying to me, to be again obliged to offer an excuse, for not having written more frequently to you, and to my father however conscious I may be, of its having been out of my Power, yet the Idea, of your suspecting me of neglecting you, worries me very much. But it has been and still is absolutely necessary for me, to apply myself with unremitting attention to my studies. About ten...
An anxiety to preserve a consistancy of Character in the opinion of Mrs. Adams (in whose favourable sentiments I feel myself more and more interested) induces me to say, that I have some reason to believe, that the late Connection, which appeared an insurmountable Obstacle to the accomplishment of the Wish nearest my heart—exists no longer. And from the opinion I have of the Lady, I am...