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I have now the happiness of presenting to you another daughter, worthy as I fully believe of adding one to the number of those who already endear that relation to you.— The day before yesterday united us for life. My recommendation of her to your kindness and affection I know will be unnecessary. My sentiment of her merit, will not at this moment especially boast its impartiality , but if...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
I take my pen to make a Recuest to you in Behalf of Elisha adams as you are in high Surcomestances I was affraid to Right Butt have Ben [Prevld?] with to Dear madam the Case is this Elisha adams has Bought a Plase which he agred to give 1600 hundrede Dollers and has Paid 800 Dollers Try Be So kind as to Lend him 4 or 5 hundrede Dollers tis Not in my Power to Let him have the money I Shuld be...
I this Day Received your kind Letter and we are all Happy to hear of your Safe arivall at Quincy we are all in the Dumps the yellow fever has again found its way in to this City and threatens Great mortality the hoal City is in Confusion and mooving out of town it first Broke out in Spruce and Pen Street and thair Seems to be Confined at Present But how fare it will go God only knows if it...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
I received Your Favour of Octob r. 17. last, and have agreably to your Request consulted Deac n Pierce, respecting an Addition to your Dwelling House, He is of opinion that if an Addition be made in Front, (which He supposes to be practicable) it will be necessary to take the east Chimney down; the Floors below & in the Chambers must be taken up as well as some other Parts of the Rooms— upon...
I acknowledge the receipt of your very obliging favour of th’ 23 d of Nov br and should have done myself that pleasure before but was prevented by a severe indisposition (from which I am now pretty well recover’d) and the afflicting loss of my Father which has called my Sister from me I am extremely anxious to hear from M r. Gerry at Paris I find by my letters from him previous to his quitting...
I write my dear Sister with a hope that this letter will not find you in Philadelphia but as we have not heard that congress have risen I would not have you without a line of information that we are all well & that your chambers are ready the mason has promis’d to white wash the house & mrs Porter is waiting for orders to clean for your reception I have been fearful for your health & that of...
Pardon my thus abruptly addressing you. I plead the occasion as my apology— I am just informed that M r: Leonard Jarvis expects soon to quit his Office. The Office is considered as a decent livelihood. Were I seeking emolument for myself I might be diffident; but when soliciting for the Interest & happiness of a Parent, I am emboldened, & venture to presume upon your friendship & goodness on...
If words could express the gratitude I feel for your kindness to me, & my Children, it would be worth while to delineate it upon paper, but as I am sure the attemt would be vain, I can only beg of him to reward you a thousand fold, who alone knows your particular wants, & can amply supply either body, or mind, out of his rich treasury— I sent for Cousin Charles to spend the Sabbath with me, he...
I presume Dear Madam that I Shall receive Your pardon by Complying with the request of M r. Charles Bulfinch, to be the bearer of a Letter of Mine to You— his wish without doubt is to be Noticed in Your family, as an acquaintance of this.— his Merrits Need Not be Mention’d as they are well known— He is Now imploy’d (And his expences paid) by a Number of Gentlemen, to veiw the Banks in Your...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
Your kind attention to my last emboldens me again to interrupt your more important pursuits, & offer my warmest acknowledgement for your excellent letter and the packet accompaning it, received Jan 13 th. Yours, my aunt, afforded a fund of refined and rational pleasure. Besides containing much valuable information, it pleasingly assured me of a share of that love and friendship, which I have...
From an old friend the companion of your youthfull days you will allow the familliarity I use— I was so Struck with the intelligence m r Belcher left this morning that I am hardly capable of writing but the Spirit constraineth me the dispensations of providence are so visibly kind they have a voice of their own and need not be repeated— Peace to the Spirits of the departed they had their Dear...
I was not more fortunate in the weather on my return, than I was in going to Phila a. 3 days out 5 on the road it constantly rain’d.— before this you have seen the Speech of our New. Gov. & the answers of the Senate & House. this Election is as popular as any for some Years. the Answer from the House pass d. as reported by the Com tee. without any debate or the least alteration. the Printers...
Your Letters of the 21. 22. 23. and 26 of April are all before me— They have inspired me with all the Melancholly in which they were written. Our Mother and our Niece are gone to rest. The first a fruit fully ripe the last but a blossom or a bud.— I have Suffered for you as much as you have Suffered— But I could give you no Aid or Amusement or Comfort.— I pray God that these dispensations may...
I have no doubt that you retain such an Interest in my happiness as to rejoice with me in the birth of another son. The boy appears strong and healthy and the mother seems very well.— The feelings of a Parent will easily account for such an Event being uppermost in my mind at this time.— When I wrote last to my friends at Quincy, it was my determination to have enter’d again into the...
Your Letter of the 31. of March made me unhappy because it convinced me that you were so. I Attribute the Cause of it all however, to the dangerous illness of Cousin Polly Smith which I am very sorry to her. The Deaths and dangerous sicknesses of your near Relations and intimate friends always affect your tender and benevolent heart with very deep and affectionate Impressions. I hope she may...
I thank you, my dear Madam, for your obliging fav r. of 5 th. instant, and for the interest you take in my happiness. Upon further deliberation, I had, before the receipt of your Letter, renounced all ideas of returning to Boston, and had determined immediately to apply for admission to the Bar in this state. I shall for this purpose go to Annapolis on Monday, and as soon after my return from...
I have this day rec d , in your favours of the 5. 6. and 7 th. of the month the first Acknowledgment of the Receipt of my Invitations to you to come to Philadelphia and share in the Burthens of your friend. I hope you may have commenced your Journey before this day: but knowing how many dispositions you have to make, and how difficult it will be to make them I cannot promise myself the...
I am much oblig’d by your favors of the 30 Ult. & 6 th Ins t. with the inclosures the communications from our Commiss. will, when publish’d, have the most happy effect. Many who were zealous friends to French, not long since, are now as zealous friends to their own country. I hope our Commiss. will be able to make good their retreat, before the contents of their dispatches arrive.— we have had...
I am So constantly engaged in Business most of which is new to me, that it Seems as if it was impossible to find time to write even to you— Yet I believe I write every Post. It proves to be a tedious Business to clear the Presidents house for me. I am now told it will not be ready this Week. You will See by the Gazette how the new Pensilvania House is disposed of. The Weather is bad— I have a...
I send you the Letters— I could not keep my hands off of Nabby’s. I beg her Pardon. They write me flattering Accounts from Phil a. M r Anthony writes most confidently. No danger. No fever—alls well.— When Brisler goes he should throw Lime into the Cellar Vault &c. I think We ought to have been together to day. But tomorrow will do. I am glad Malcom came out. We must prepare to go to Phil a....
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
I had a mantua makaker & a Tailor last week which keept me so fully imploy’d that I had not time to write I receiv’d your kind Letter by the Post a thursday & rejoice that you have got into such good order so soon. I do not rise quite so early as you but I should if I could get all my folks to Bed in season you do well to devote so much of the day to riding I hope the difficulty the bad roads...
I am doom’d my dear Sister to be the messenger of death to you. I believe for five weeks past my Letters have convey’d you an account of the death of Some Freind or acquaintence & almost all of them Suddenly taken away the death of Sucky warner whos remains I yesterday Saw depositted by the Side of our dear Parents & much belov’d aunt. there to remain till the last trumpet Shall bid them...
Your’s of the 6 th Instant I received yesterday together with the Extracts from Bache’s Paper they have not yet found their way in to the Chronicle ’tho it may be expected. with respect to the Charge against the President of Insinserity in the Interval between his Address to Congress and his Nomination I can say that I took notice of the same here two Days only before the Nomination was known...
To hear of your health and happiness my dear Madam is always pleasing to me when ever you can spare time from the many ingagements I know you have I shall esteem it a favour. I am flattered from the pleasing account you give of my Daughter White she was always a good Child and I think she will do all she can to render the Family she is in happy Mr s Bartlett is a fine Woman. Mr Dalton and I...
I write now because I know how it feels to be disappointed not because I have any thing to communicate of importance. I receiv’d your kind Letter of the 13 th of this month what related to my dear Son has given me great pain tis no more than I have fear’d. but his Father Says if he can get over these difficulties he will be as cunning as the ——— he does not speak wicked words you know. my fear...