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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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To hear of your health and happiness my dear Madam is always pleasing to me when ever you can spare time from the many ingagements I know you have I shall esteem it a favour. I am flattered from the pleasing account you give of my Daughter White she was always a good Child and I think she will do all she can to render the Family she is in happy Mr s Bartlett is a fine Woman. Mr Dalton and I...
After your having been three months in the City of Philadelphia at this season of the year I think our good Friend the President and you must want some relaxation, and the sea air for a few weeks will be gratefull to you. as we are agreeably situated near the river I dont feel the want of it. where ever you are I wish health and happyness to attend, and hope you will return perfectly recovered...
It gives me great pleasure to know you are so near me and I should have told you so and condoled with you and our good Friend the President before this time on the loss of his good Mother had I not been much ingaged in moveing into the City. by what I have heard your loss must be much her gain I think She had lived till She could sing the song of good old Simeon I was flattered by the kind...
I acknowledge the receipt of your very obliging favour of th’ 23 d of Nov br and should have done myself that pleasure before but was prevented by a severe indisposition (from which I am now pretty well recover’d) and the afflicting loss of my Father which has called my Sister from me I am extremely anxious to hear from M r. Gerry at Paris I find by my letters from him previous to his quitting...
I am honored by your letter of the 8 th , & am much obliged to you for the kind interest you have manifested in my concerns; & for the communications contained in the letter & documents. Whatever may have been the reasons which induced some of the senators to vote against me, if they were influenced by a due regard to the publick welfare, & their opinions in this instance were even erroneous,...
I take my pen to make a Recuest to you in Behalf of Elisha adams as you are in high Surcomestances I was affraid to Right Butt have Ben [Prevld?] with to Dear madam the Case is this Elisha adams has Bought a Plase which he agred to give 1600 hundrede Dollers and has Paid 800 Dollers Try Be So kind as to Lend him 4 or 5 hundrede Dollers tis Not in my Power to Let him have the money I Shuld be...
From an old friend the companion of your youthfull days you will allow the familliarity I use— I was so Struck with the intelligence m r Belcher left this morning that I am hardly capable of writing but the Spirit constraineth me the dispensations of providence are so visibly kind they have a voice of their own and need not be repeated— Peace to the Spirits of the departed they had their Dear...
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
If words could express the gratitude I feel for your kindness to me, & my Children, it would be worth while to delineate it upon paper, but as I am sure the attemt would be vain, I can only beg of him to reward you a thousand fold, who alone knows your particular wants, & can amply supply either body, or mind, out of his rich treasury— I sent for Cousin Charles to spend the Sabbath with me, he...
I have thought day after day, that another should not pass without writing to my much loved Sister; that tomorrow I should have time , & would devote it, to the effusions of Sisterly affection, but I find each day fraught with its cares, & now more peculiarly so by my dear Betsy Quincy’s being sick with a lung fever, in consequence (I suppose) of a sudden cold. She was voilently seized with a...
Health to my Sister, under a more fervid Sun, than that to which she has hitherto been accustomed. Yes! I most ardently wish you this most needfull blessing, without which all others must be tasteless, even Friends a burden, & grandeur painful.— I hope Queen Mab has told me a falsehood. She came last thursday night in her airy Chariot, drove directly upon my heart, presenting you to me, laying...
Since my last my time has been cheifly occupied, in attending to those services, which were due to our late worthy Nephew— Though we had been in daily expectation of his dissolution, & every breath he drew seemed as if I heard a voice, saying “Sister Spirit come away” yet it was a sudden stroke at the close— As he called the watcher who set by him, Aunt, I suppose he took her for me ; & I was...
Least I should forget it, I acknowledge the receipt of ten Dollars you sent while I was at Haverhill, but in the multiplicity of my thoughts I for-got to mention it— you will please to excuse me— I have conversed with Mr Attwood about receiving pay for his expences he absolutely refuses taking anything for his trouble— The extra, charges I have seen payed, by mony Mr Attwood, & I found in his...
Some lover of your nephews happiness, last thursday added something to the fragment of life, by placing in my hands your agreeable favor of March 20 th. The pamphlet sent me, I give you my sincere thanks. Is not Mr. Pickering the author. As soon as I read it, I thought I could see in it his simple style and forcible reasoning. I had read both Scipio and Munroes view, before I received your...
Your kind attention to my last emboldens me again to interrupt your more important pursuits, & offer my warmest acknowledgement for your excellent letter and the packet accompaning it, received Jan 13 th. Yours, my aunt, afforded a fund of refined and rational pleasure. Besides containing much valuable information, it pleasingly assured me of a share of that love and friendship, which I have...
I was not more fortunate in the weather on my return, than I was in going to Phila a. 3 days out 5 on the road it constantly rain’d.— before this you have seen the Speech of our New. Gov. & the answers of the Senate & House. this Election is as popular as any for some Years. the Answer from the House pass d. as reported by the Com tee. without any debate or the least alteration. the Printers...
Your several favors of the 1 st & 9 th Ins. I have rec d. & am much oblig’d to you for the inclosures. the situation of the United States is indeed very critical, but in my opinion, every day strengthens the Union of the people in favor of the government. the Treason of Blount will confirm the sentiments of many, that all nations are equally friends to us so long as their interest is benefited...
I am much oblig’d by your favors of the 30 Ult. & 6 th Ins t. with the inclosures the communications from our Commiss. will, when publish’d, have the most happy effect. Many who were zealous friends to French, not long since, are now as zealous friends to their own country. I hope our Commiss. will be able to make good their retreat, before the contents of their dispatches arrive.— we have had...
It would be singular indeed, were I to permit your friendly note of March 9 th. to pass unanswered, and not to thank you for forwarding the letter from the west-ward, which accompanied it, I should not have taken the liberty of desiring my correspondents to have addressed letters to me, to the care of the Presidents secretary, had I not experienced the basest treatment thro’ the line of the...
Pardon my thus abruptly addressing you. I plead the occasion as my apology— I am just informed that M r: Leonard Jarvis expects soon to quit his Office. The Office is considered as a decent livelihood. Were I seeking emolument for myself I might be diffident; but when soliciting for the Interest & happiness of a Parent, I am emboldened, & venture to presume upon your friendship & goodness on...
I presume Dear Madam that I Shall receive Your pardon by Complying with the request of M r. Charles Bulfinch, to be the bearer of a Letter of Mine to You— his wish without doubt is to be Noticed in Your family, as an acquaintance of this.— his Merrits Need Not be Mention’d as they are well known— He is Now imploy’d (And his expences paid) by a Number of Gentlemen, to veiw the Banks in Your...
I feel as if I were My worthy friend, Compel’d to write a few lines to you in this uncommon hour of distressing events that await you. Tho’ what you wished with respect to one of the deceased has happen’d—Yet Not the less affecting I am sure— Your Mind I think Must be freed from a Charge that Seem’d to dewell heavy upon you— when I last had the Satisfaction of Seeing You — at this Moment the...
I received Your Favour of Octob r. 17. last, and have agreably to your Request consulted Deac n Pierce, respecting an Addition to your Dwelling House, He is of opinion that if an Addition be made in Front, (which He supposes to be practicable) it will be necessary to take the east Chimney down; the Floors below & in the Chambers must be taken up as well as some other Parts of the Rooms— upon...
In my last I enclosed a rough Plan of the proposed Addition to the Wood House, that Plan will exhibit to You an Idea of the lower Room; since then I have found, that it will not be much more expensive, to take the Roof off from the Wood house & Library and erect a new one over them, than to proceed in the Way that was projected. I have accordingly orderd it to be framd in this Way; upon this...
It is now past Ten o Clock Am. and a violent Snow Storm which began about 7 o Clock this Morning still continues, the Thermometer stands at. 32. and has not been much lower in any Snow Storm We have had in the Winter past— Our Winter has been severe, the Month of March cold & stormy, April hitherto has been a continuation of the Scene, but Two or Three Days of fair Weather thro the Day, since...
As you are now in a Sphere of Life that requires the Enjoyment of Health, the Exercise of Wisdom, Patience and every other Virtue, I wish you the Possession of these equal to its Exigences and that as is the Day so may be your Strength. I feel anxious for my Friends, but peculiarly so for the State of my Country, at the same Time can chearfully leave it to the Care of Providence and those on...
Have I my dear madam appeared negligent in not answering your last friendly letter jest before you left this state.— low health through the winter may be an apology— I could make several others if necessary. but it can be of no importance for you to hear often from a retired individual whose Greatest pleasure is the retrospect of past life—of departed enjoyments—of future hope from a wish to...
Your’s of the 6 th Instant I received yesterday together with the Extracts from Bache’s Paper they have not yet found their way in to the Chronicle ’tho it may be expected. with respect to the Charge against the President of Insinserity in the Interval between his Address to Congress and his Nomination I can say that I took notice of the same here two Days only before the Nomination was known...
I had the Pleasure of receiving your Letter of 23 Ult o: with the Pamphlet last Saturday 27 th: for which please to accept my Thanks. According to your Directions I requested Russell to send the Centinel to you which he has since informed me he has done; you will see the Statement made relative to the Nomination and by this Scrap from the Chronicle the pitifull Venom of Envy in the party...