You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Thaxter, John
  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Thaxter, John" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail"
Results 31-54 of 54 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 2
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Permit me to congratulate you on the safe Arrival of Mr. Adams at France. It is an event that has relieved many of his friends from pain­ ful anxieties. I could have wished for the happiness of communicating the very agreeable intelligence to you. I hope it has reached you before this date. His arrival was taken notice of in the French papers and also in a London paper, which have been...
Mr. Adams having taken a Journey to Holland for three or four Weeks, and there being nothing of consequence to do in his Absence, Mr. Storer and myself thought it an exceeding good opportunity of executing our Project of a Voyage to this place, for the sake of the Sea Bath. We arrived here on the 27th. instant, after a delightfully fatiguing Journey. We passed thro’ the Province of Normandy,...
This Afternoon I visited one of the Churches in this place; and casting my Eyes into one Corner of it I spy’d one of the Monks of the Franciscan Order, laid out in a Case, with his Robes on, his Head reclined upon a Pillar, his Hands and Fingers embracing each other, and between his Thumbs a Cross. Around the Corpse was eight Candles, four of their largest Sort and four of the common. There...
By the last Mails came the King’s Speech, the Address of the two Houses in answer, and the debates in Parliament. His most gracious Majesty is sorry, that the Americans and French have catched one of his flying Generals with an Army, because the Rectitude of his Cause entitled him to better luck. He tells his Parliament the Rebellion is still fomented, and that his Subjects continue in that...
On Monday Morning I had the Honor to go with his Excellency and Mr. D ana to breakfast with the celebrated Abbè Reynald, in Com­ pany with a large Collection of Nobility and Gentry of both Sexes. In opening upon this Company, (which was unexpected to poor me) I felt all that irksome Discomposure and painful Confusion, which so respectable an Assembly of Strangers could produce in one...
Your much esteemed favor came to hand this day, in which you inform me of the departure of your “dearest Friend.” I sincerely wish for your sake it had been convenient and safe for you to have accompanied him: But the danger you mention must, I think, have made the voyage disagreeable and had the event taken place, doubly aggravating on his part.—I can picture to myself the separation and your...
A few days since I had the honor of a letter from Mr. A., who I have the pleasure to inform You is well with his two Sons. Mr. Dana is gone also to Amsterdam—he left Paris the 12th instant. What his Object is I know not—his determination was sudden and unexpected, and occasioned by the Arrival of Mr. Searle, but this by the bye. I am left here of Course a miserable, solitary lonely Being,...
I had the honor yesterday of a most excellent letter under the signature of Portia dated 21st. July; and altho’ I wrote You largely but yesterday, yet it would be unpardonable to omit the earliest opportunity of most gratefully acknowledging the receipt of a letter, which from its Morality, its refined Sentiments and its Patriotism does infinite honour to the Writer. I have read with the...
We arrived here the 26th. last Month after a tedious Journey in a crazy Carriage, with the additional Circumstances and Douceurs of constant Rains and bad Roads. Nothing however compared to Spain. At Valenciennes, the first City of France in coming from Holland, we stopped half a day. The greatest Curiosity we saw there was in a Church, where we found the Virgin Mary encirling the City with a...
In my melancholy, unhappy Moments, (for such I sometimes have), I recur to my old Letters for Consolation, and to none with more pleasure than the sentimental ones of Portia. Letters give Wings to the Imagination; and by their Aid I can transport myself in an instant to H ingha m, or B rai n tr ee and there enjoy the Company of my Friends. In reading over again your’s of the 18th. July last, I...
Your favor of the 9th. of December last informs me of the Arrival of the Apollo, Minerva, and Juno, three of fabulous Divinity who know nothing of me You observe. I do not wish to altercate even with Gods, much less with Goddesses: but I have a Right to quarrel with the Destinies, or bad Men, and there is but little benefit, I fear, arising from Contests of this kind. What am I to do with such...
Your much esteemed favors of 23d. July and 19th. Augst. came to hand on Monday. Your Letters and the inclosed ones were very acceptable; as they contained agreeable Information. The Letter of June from you and also those from home of the same month mentioned that our Parents were under the operation of a disease, which has swept away it s thousands. Tho’ Art has check’d its malignity, yet...
That a Nation once distinguished in the Annals of Mankind, should by the Pride, Avarice, Ambition, Injustice and Oppression of its Governors, loose its distant Dependencies, is not an uncommon Event in the History of the World; but that the same Nation, from the Operation of the same Causes, together with Folly and Madness, should league one half the World against her, is not only a Phenomenon...
Your favor of the 21st. and 26th. of May came to hand yesterday. I was exceedingly shocked at the first mention of the capture of the Boston, till I had read the latter part of the paragraph, which related the circumstances. From those circumstances, Madam, I must beg leave to observe, no facts can be collected, and they leave it at least a very dubious, if not an improbable event. She sailed...
On the ninth of this Month We all happily arrived here, and with Hearts replete with Gratitude. Our Journey was long, cold, tedious and painful to an extream degree. After being fortunately delivered from a crazy and leaky Ship, We had conjectured our future Enterprises would be less irksome. Our Consolation and Triumph upon the Occasion terminated almost as soon as they existed. We had hardly...
For about three Weeks in the Time of Lent, the Play Houses are shut up, on account of its being a Season for the Care (not Cure ) of Souls. To a City so much accustomed to Amusements as Paris, this is a Time of Mourning and Sadness. Horse racing and Bull baiting have been invented to fill up a part of this Interval of Sorrow. But what is called the Fête des longs Champs, or long Fields, is the...
About three weeks agone, I forwarded a packet of Letters to Mr. Cranch, inclosing one to him—the first since I have been in Europe, that I ever transmitted to America without a line to your Ladyship. I must confess the packet seemed incomplete—a want of time rendered it so. I am persuaded that my Punishment will far surpass your disappointment. However to avoid a similar Misfortune again, I...
In receiving the Communication, that the T reaty of Amity and Commerce between the United States of America, and the seven United Provinces, was yesterday signed , You will at the same Time accept my sincere Congratulations upon this Event. It has been a long, tedious and troublesome Negotiation, and fortunately for our Country in very good Hands. Every Negotiation here takes up so much Time,...
On the 10th. of this Month I had the pleasure of recieving Letters from Hingham dated in February, which informed me of the Health of all Friends at both my dear Homes. They contain the first News I have recieved of the Kind. They gave me Relief from a Burden of Anxiety I had been under respecting the Severity of the Winter there. I have also Letters from Braintree, which inform me, that a...
I have been honoured with your favor of the 5th. February last. It would give me infinite Satisfaction to contribute in any way to your Enquiries into the Religion, Government, manners and Customs of this Country: and in some future Letter I will endeavour to give a small sketch (tho very imperfect) of them. The best History of this Country is in Dutch , and according to the Stile of the...
I was made happy this day by the Receipt of your esteemed favor of the 2d. of March. You say, that in the seperation of near Friends, You have ever thought the person left at Home the greatest Sufferer, and that anticipated Evils have often as much Power over the Mind as real ones. This Observation is the Result of that extream Sensibility of which You are possessed, and which has been but too...
Since I wrote you last, the mystery of blank Dispatches being sent by Capt. Folgier from France has been developed. One Capt. Hinson (who was honored with Dr. Franklin’s confidence) was guilty of the treachery and robbery. Hinson it seems was to have brought the Dispatches if Folgier declined. But when he found that Folgier accepted the trust, he, from his knowledge of the position and, I...
I am happy in informing you, that the Marquiss de La Fayette has safely returned to the Main Camp, after a Brush with a party of the Enemy from the City; in which he had nearly been captivated. I have not learnt all the particulars of the affair; but from the best knowledge I can obtain, I dont find that any thing material did take place, altho’ it had like to have proved a serious matter to...
I forwarded a Letter to You, Madam, yesterday by Capt. Barney, Commander of the Packet Washington, and this I expect will go by the Cicero, Capt. Hill. Have the Vessels done passing between Boston and Europe? I have received no Letters a long time from home, and I begin to grow a little impatient, especially since I have heard of my Father’s Misfortune. I have a half Story about the Matter,...