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    • Cranch, Mary Smith
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Your kind letter I receiv’d to day and am greatly rejoiced to hear you are all so well. I was very uneasy at not hearing from you, indeed my dear Sister the Winter never seem’d so tedious to me in the World. I daily count the days between this and the time I may probably see you. I could never feel so comfortable as I at present do, if I thought I should spend another Winter here. Indeed my...
I thank you my dear Sister for all your kind offers. I have not been able yet to get Miss Dolly Read. I expected her yesterday: but what has prevented I cant say. As to moving, we want to see Mr. Russel before we talk again with Mr. Cleavely. Mr. Cranch is so hurried with Work that he does not know how to spare time to see after any thing, and I am so unwell that I am not able too. I do not...
Long e’er this time I hope my dear Sister and Cousin have sat their Feet upon the British shore, and been made happy by the sight of their long absent Friends. Your mind must have been greatly agitated as you drew near the place where you expected to meet them, uncertain as you were whether the first inteligence would produce you the most exquisite pleasure, or the most Poignant distress. I...
Accept my dear Sister a thousand thanks for your charming Journal, it is just Such an one as I wish’d, so particular that while reading it, I could not help fancying my self with you. We hoped as we had Such fine weather for six weeks after you Sail’d, that you would have had a quicker Passage than I find you had. You did not feel more joy when you set your feet upon the British Coast, than I...
When I return’d from Haverhill I hurry’d over a very incorrect Scrowl, being as I thought very much in danger of not geting it on board Capt. Scott before he saild, but here is Mr. Tyler just return’d from Boston and tells me he will not Sail till Teysday. I dont Love to have Letters lay by so. They will seem such old things when you get them that half their value will be lost. Mr. Tyler has...
Mr. Tyler has this moment reciev’d a Letter from Cousin Nabby by Captn. Lyde. I hope there are some in Boston for me. I have not heard one word from you Since you left England. The time has appeard very long. The Scenes you are now ingag’d in are so very different from any of your former ones, that I fear you will not have so much time to devote to your Pen as your Friends could wish. I am all...
I yet do not know that you have receiv’d one of the many Letters I have sent you but hope you have all. I too well know the pleasure of receiving intelligance from my absent Friends, to let one vessail Sail without carring Some Token of Sisterly remembrance from me if I know of the oppertunity Soon enough. I have not an Idea that I shall inhance the value of my Letters, by withholding them. I...
Not one line from my dear Sister have I reciev’d sinc last September. What can be the reason? I hope the letters we have written to you are all come safe to your Hands and that you have had no great expence in geting them. We have done all we could to prevent it. John Cranch tells us of a large Pacquit coming from the Hague by the English Ambassador which Mr. Elworthy sent to you. I hope one...
I reciv’d your September Letters a little while after I sent off my November ones, and a Feast they were to me. Mr. Storer inform’d us of your leaving England, any thing further was all conjecture. We have not had one chance of Sending to you this winter except by the way of Amsterdam last week: but as I thought you would get a Letter sooner from England, and Capn. Lyde was to sail soon, I...
I have just heard that Scot is to sail tomorrow. I cannot let a vessel go without a few Lines when I know of it. I have a letter began at home for you, but I cannot get it Soon enough to go by this conveyence. The children have Letters for you and their Cousin but they must all wait for the next vessel. I have had so much company lately that it has been impossible to write as we would have...
I have been waiting till I am out of all patience to hear that you are returnd to England. One or two vessels have sail’d for London without taking Letters for you. I did not know they were going till it was too late to write. I sent you a hasty line by Mr. Charles Bulfinch which I hope you receiv’d and to tell you the truth I have written you two letters Since, which I thought proper to...
I have just Sent away one Letter and shall now begin another to be ready for the next ship. Cousin John is not yet arriv’d. I hear of him upon the road. He has not quite done his duty. He should have written to one of his uncles at least as soon as he came on Shore, but I will not chide him without hearing his reasons, I feel inclin’d to be very partial to him. I have just heard that cousin...
I hope my dear Sister you have receiv’d the Letter You was looking for in Callahan. I think I did not send it till the next Ship Saild. I have put a very long letter aboard this Ship a month since, supposing she would sail in a few days. Last night I receiv’d your Letter of the i6th of august and am not a little surpriz’d at the contents. My dear Niece has acted with a Spirit worthy of her...
Although I have written so largly to you by the last vessels that Saild I cannot bear to let another go without a few Lines. I have not yet receiv’d your Letters by Charles Storer. He is not come to Boston. I am anxious to receive them. I want to know what it is, whether any thing in particular has happen’d to make my Neice take such a determin’d part with regard to a certain Gentleman. He is...
How provoking it is to be told that a vessel is to sail next week with our Letters and then have it stay in the Harbour six Weeks. I thought till yesterday that Capn. Young was half way to London at least, and behold he will not leave Boston this week. The Letters will be so old, that they will lose much of their value, but tis no fault of mine. I have been waiting some time without writing...
Mr. Storer is arriv’d and I have got my Letter and am very sorry to hear you have been so sick. If I had receiv’d this Letter before those by Callahan I should have been very uneasey till I could have heard again. I Will hope you are by this time perfectly recover’d. You will see by mine of November 29th that our thoughts in September and October were imploy’d about the same melancholy...
I did not design to write another line till I could get my pen mendid but not a creature can I get to do it, and I am so affraid that Captain Lyde will sail without my Pacquit that I dare not venture to wait till the children come from college tomorrow. I hope to see the dear Boys, and if the ship should not go so soon as I expect I will write again. I shall certainly write by the way of New...
I wonder whether Mr. Shaw ever wrote you an account of the good woman who was so much offendid that you were not treated with more civillity when you went to see the King and Queen. “Why I hear they did not so much as ask them to set down, but keept them standing four hours without offering them any thing to eat or drink. I thought such great Folks knew what good manners was, better than to...
The vacancy is up and our Sons are just return’d to their Studies at college. Were they Brothers they could not be fonder of each other than they now are. They have spent eight or Ten days at Haverhill, and have rov’d about visiting their Friends till they both long’d heartily for the methodical Life they left at Cambridge. I have promiss’d them a chamber and a Fire too themselves if they...
Your Son JQA is become a son of Harvard. He was admited last wednesday, and we are now prepairing him for House-keeping. He has a chamber with one of the Masters till commencment, then He and his Brother charles will live together if they can. The young Gentleman finds the Bed and Linnen. I have taken the Furniture for the Chamber from your House a few things were to be purchased at Boston....
Yes my dear Sister I have thought it very long since I have receiv’d a Letter from you and thought it very Strange that you should not write me one line by the January Pacquit when mr cranch receiv’d one from mr Adams. You say you wrote but one Letter by it, but do not tell me who it was too none of your Friends here have receiv’d any, and mr King directed a number of other pioples to mr...
Is it possible that my dear Niece should really be married and the little visiting Card upon which a peice of Ribbon was wound be the only way in which my sister has thought proper to convey the pleasseing intellegence to her Friends? It is an event which almost every one hop’d, and every one I know will approve. For my Self, I most heartily congratulate you all, not only upon your acquisition...
I have been almost frighted out of my senses this afternoon. Your Mother Hall and Polly Adams came to spend the day with me, but had like to have been kill’d before they return’d. As they were geting into the chaise to go home, the Horse took a fright and although he was fastind to the hook in the Tree, he broke the Bridle and a way he went. Mr Wibird had just help’d in miss Polly and had...
I did not receive your last Letter by the way of new york till after the vessail had Sail’d with my Letters. I was much diverted to think the few Lines coll: smith wrote in your name should have produce’d you So long a Letter from Mr Cranch. The coll really counterfitted your hand writing very well. Betsy said as soon as she saw it, that it did not look just like aunts hand. If it was hers She...
I have within this Hour receiv’d your Letters by captain Bigelow and have also heard that cushing is not sail’d. He has one Letter on board for you already but tis not so long a one as I have generally sent you. The Subject was So melancholy that I could not mix any thing with it. I expected every hour that Cushing would sail and had not time to write more. I began to write you last night but...
Capt Folger is slipt a way without one line from me. I did not design it should have been so, but it is vacancy, and I have been very unwell. Miss Nabby Marsh has been so sick that I could not have her but one day just to cut out work for us. I have been oblig’d to put out cousin charles’s Red coat to turn and the Blue coat you sent to make for him. He will look quite Parsonish with his Black...
In my last I told you I suppos’d your Son Thomas would enter college at the end of the vacancy. He did so, and enter’d with honour. He could not have a chamber in college this year, but he has a very good one at mr Sewalls, and boards with the Family. It is not so well as boarding in college, but it was the best thing we could do. We have furnish’d his chamber with Cousin Charles Furniture. It...
In the begining of this month I made a visit to Haverhill found them all well. Mr Duncan married to a maiden Lady about sixty years old a sister of Judge Greenliefs of Newburry port. We made the Weding Visit. It is the easiest thing in the world for Some people to Bury wives and get new ones. If you hear of any of your acquaintance losing a wife you may expect in the next letter, at least to...
I last evening receiv’d your kind Letter by the Way of new york and most heartily congratulate you upon the marriage of your only Daughter. It is a very desirable thing to see our children happily Settled in the world. Your anxietys for my dear Niece for several years have been very many and great. They are I hope now all at an end, at least of such a kind. No state is exempt from troubles,...
As I was seting quite alone this evening somebody came in from Boston with a Hankerchief full of Letters from you my dear, dear Sister. The Girls are neither of them at home, but I have ventur’d to open their Pacquits also, and a hearty laugh I have had at the extravagant Figures you have sent. Yes my sister our Ladies are foolish enough to deserve some of the ridicule. Those unnatural...
Cousin Charles and I have stay’d at home from meeting to day, he to write to his Papa and I because I was fatigue’d with runing about Boston Street for two days to pick up a number of things for our Sons. Mr JQA wanted a winter wastcoat and mr charles a Gown and a Pair of Breeches and little Tom a surtout. He had his Brother charless last winter and uses it, this to Answer the purpose of a...
Come home my Sister, that Braintree may have some of its old inhabitants residing in it. Could you look in upon it, you would sigh over some of its desirted mansions. General Palmers Family mov’d last week to charlestown. They came here in a violent Snow-Storm; they had sent away all their Provision and had nothing to eat. The next day they Set off in much better Spirits than I expected. The...
I reciev’d a few days since your Letter of Sepr. 12th and yesterday that of october the 12th and thank you most sincerly for them both. Your account of Holland entertaind me much. You must have improv’d your time well to have visited so many places and notic’d so much. The fatigue was too great for you. It was this that made you sick. I was rejoic’d to find your dissorder whatever it was for...
I have sent one Letter on Board callahan, but hope he has not yet sail’d, as I have much to say that I was oblig’d to omit then for want of time. Betsy has written to you also. By her Letter you will see the State of her mind better than by any thing I can Say, but I am Sure you will wonder how such a change in her affections took place. You may remember what I mention’d to you before you went...
There is another vessel up which will sail soon. What I may have omited by this I shall write by that. Our uncle Quincy was well a few hours since is glad to see his Friends but cannot be perswaided out. Cousin Cotton remains the same he was, Flying from spray to spray without determining Where to chuse his Partner. If his Father should marry as he will certainly do as soon as he can get time...
If you have reciev’d our Letters by Capn Callahan you will be in Some measure prepair’d for the accounts which Capn Folger will bring you of the Rebellion which exists in this state. It had arisen to such a height that it was necessary to oppose it by force of arms. We are always in this country to do things in an extraordinary many manner . The militia were call’d for, but there was not a...
Captain Cushing arriv’d last Monday after a tedious Passage It was so long since I receiv’d any Letters from you that I began to be very impatient. Cousin JQA had one in the winter but I have only heard of it. he forgot that I should want to see it & so did not bring it with him this vacancy your sons are now all of them with me. cousin JQA return’d last evening from an excurtion. I perswaided...
I went to Boston yesterday & had the mortification to find my Letters did not go by Barnard or Davis although they had been on Board each of them. they got to town just as the vessels were sailing. Knox the Pilot took them as he was going on Board, & promiss’d to deliver them to the captain, but forgot it So after wearing them in His Pockit four or five days he return’d them as dirty as I...
I have sent one Letter on Board capt Cushing but it is so long since that unless I Write again you will not feel as if you had heard from me for a long time— Cousin JQA & Billy have been at home above a week. Cousin charles was here yesterday. he came to wait upon mrs Hilliard & Daughter— your Sons are all well We are busy prepairing for commencment for although we do so little by way of...
My dear sister will I am sure excuse me if I send her now but a short Letter—when she is inform’d that there is but one day between this & commencment & that I have but just hear’d that cap t. Folger will sail this week It is true we are doing but little but it makes us more work than Ten such entertainments at home. every thing is dress’d here, & to be cut cold at cambridge except Green Peas....
The Day—the mighty Day is over, & our Sons have perform’d their Parts—& receiv’d the Honour of the college in a manner which will do them credit while they Live— never did you see two Happier Faces than theirs when they return’d from meeting— I do not believe they will ever feel so happy again— If to excell where all did well—can give pleasure your Son must feel a peculiar one. He has a...
The vacancys of our Sons always produces a hurry in our business & although we endeavour to keep every thing in good order for them from week to week—yet when they come home they have many wants which we could not foresee— we have sent your two youngest Sons in good health & good repair to college & are now fixing your eldest for Newbury & our own for Boston Cousin Tom has made a visit to...
I wrote to you about three weeks since thinking clallahan would sail immediatly but he is not yet gone & I find Folger will go before him—but my Letters will be old unless I add a short one now— I was not a little dissapointed by not receiving a Line by the Last vessel which arriv’d Doctor Tufts receiv’d one from you & he got it before those you sent by the way of new york He will tell you...
I went to Boston last Monday & there found that Barnard had arriv’d & brought me Letters both from you & Mrs Smith— I carre’d all mine for you & put them on board Folger—who said he should sail immediatly, but I hear he will not till next Teusday. I thought I had said every thing & told you all you would wish to know in my large Pacquet—but your Letter has given me new subjects—& first let me...
To hear that our dear good uncle Smith is added to the number of the Friends who have departed this Life since you left america will not greatly surprize you if you have receiv’d my Letters by the last ships which sail’d: yes my sister That good Man last monday morning about Two a clock clos’d his Eyes upon this vain world never more to open them till the last joyful Trump shall Wake to life...
I last week heard from all your sons they were well. After this you may read on calmly— We are all well excepting great colds & coughs. I think in this Letter I shall not have to mention the death of any new Friend many very many of my Letters have convey’d the sorrowful tydings of some dear Friend departed, & if you should live to return to us you will find vacancys which will draw Tears from...
I have been waiting above a week hopeing to have a Letter from my dear sister informing me of her safe arrival at newyork Before I can write said I—I think I must have a Letter— you left us so unwell that I have been anxious about you ever since— I have a thousand times wish’d you back again your Letter to Mr Adams dated at Hartford has in some measure reliev’d me— I hope before this that you...
I do indeed rejoice with you all upon the happy event which took place in mr smiths Family before your arrival I hope my Neices health is perfectly restor’d that the young gentlemen are both very well—& that you may soon return accompany’d by Coll n. smith whom I wish much to see— you must not think of comeing in the stage. It would be highly improper upon every account— we receiv’d your...
I last evening receiv’d your kind Letter from Providence but shall not be able to get one to you by tomorrows Post—but shall write by the next I have not seen mr Brisler since you went away but heard that your Goods were puting on Board the vessel yesterday This day Twelves months I accompany’d my dear Brother & Sister to the House of God to offer with grateful hearts I hope our...
I promiss’d to write you by the Post when your Furniture Sail’d but Doctor Tufts Said he had done it— I hope you have it safe & that it has been more fortunate than in its last voyage— I heard you did not leave Providence till the monday after you left us. I want to hear of your arrival reception &c—how you found mr Adams mrs Smith & her little ones—whether she will continue in the House with...